Python Book

Discussion in 'Python' started by David Rasmussen, Nov 13, 2005.

  1. What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    languages)?

    /David
     
    David Rasmussen, Nov 13, 2005
    #1
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  2. David Rasmussen a écrit :
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?


    I don't know if it's the "best", but a DiveIntoPython/PythonCookbook
    combo may be a good choice.
     
    Bruno Desthuilliers, Nov 13, 2005
    #2
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  3. David Beasley's Essential Python (New Riders). It's a little dated
    now (covers only up to version 2.2) but lucid, consise, well organized.
    It restricts itself to Python's syntax and semantics and does not waste
    time explaining basic programming concepts.

    I made several attempts to learn Python but found the Python docs
    pretty poor, and the tutorial books I looked at were incredibly ponderous
    and slow. It wasn't until I got Beasley's book that I could actual find
    info effectively enough to start actually writing Python code. I still most
    often refer to it in preference to the Python docs.

    "David Rasmussen" <> wrote in message news:43779016$0$2111$...
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?
    >
    > /David
     
    Stuart McGraw, Nov 13, 2005
    #3
  4. "Stuart McGraw" <> wrote in message news:...
    > David Beasley's Essential Python (New Riders). It's a little dated
    > now (covers only up to version 2.2) [...]


    Oops, that should be "Beazley", "Python Essential Reference", and
    version 2.1.
     
    Stuart McGraw, Nov 13, 2005
    #4
  5. David Rasmussen

    Guest

    Have you tried the tutorial on python.org? It's pretty good, even for
    seasoned programmers.

    Calad Sigilon

    David Rasmussen wrote:
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?
    >
    > /David
     
    , Nov 13, 2005
    #5
  6. David Rasmussen

    Kent Johnson Guest

    David Rasmussen wrote:
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?


    I like Learning Python. Python in a Nutshell is good if you want something brief.

    Kent
     
    Kent Johnson, Nov 14, 2005
    #6
  7. David Rasmussen

    Larry Bates Guest

    The ones that were best for me:

    -Python 2.1 Bible (Dave Brueck and Stephen Tanner)
    (dated but good to learn)

    -Python Cookbook (Alex Martelli, Anna Martelli
    Ravenscroft & David Ascher)

    If you write for Windows:
    Python Programming on Win32 (Mark Hammond & Andy
    Robinson)

    Larry Bates

    David Rasmussen wrote:
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?
    >
    > /David
     
    Larry Bates, Nov 14, 2005
    #7
  8. David Rasmussen

    Guest

    David Rasmussen wrote:
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?
    >
    > /David


    A couple of years ago I was in the same boat you're in now. I learned
    from _Python in a Nutshell_ by Alex Martelli and still use it as my
    main reference. (It only covers up to version 2.2 so a new edition
    would be most welcome.) I also use the on-line Python docs and I
    second Larry Bates' comments re. the cookbook and the Windows book,
    both of which I also use occasionally.

    -- Steve
     
    , Nov 14, 2005
    #8
  9. David Rasmussen

    Magnus Lycka Guest

    David Rasmussen wrote:
    > What is the best book for Python newbies (seasoned programmer in other
    > languages)?


    I think most of the best books have been mentioned, but I thought
    that I'd add some comments. After all, different people have different
    ways of learning, and like different book styles.

    Both Martelli's "Python in a Nutshell" and Beazley's "Python Essential
    Reference" are mainly reference books. In a way, the standard library
    manual contains the same information, but Martelli's and Beazley's
    books explain things much better, and at least Martelli goes into a
    number of things outside the standard library. They have brief Python
    tutorials, but don't go into things like writing any larger programs
    involving things from several libraries etc. They are excellent if you
    want a high information density.

    The Python Cookbook mainly contains stuff from the Python Cookbook web
    site, but it's carefully selected, well edited (although a redundant
    line of code in my recipe remains) and in each chapter there is an
    initial discussion which is interesting. It's a great source of good
    Python code examples with explanations.

    If you prefer books that are more in Tutorial style, you might want
    to look at Dive Into Python (try it out in the web version first) or
    Magnus Hetland's new book (which is basically an update of his previous
    book with a different title.) I think the Python 2.1 Bible was good
    too, but it's a bit old by now.

    Then there are a lot of other books that are more narrow in scope, like
    Holden's Web Programming book, Ascher & Robinson's Windows book etc,
    but most of them are a few years old, and things change rapidly when
    it comes to libraries and tools in various niches. Many of these books
    are still very good and useful, but it takes some familarity with the
    Python world to know what to use in these books, and what to find more
    current information for.

    I hope you'll have a great time with Python!
     
    Magnus Lycka, Nov 14, 2005
    #9
  10. On Mon, 14 Nov 2005 17:41:58 +0100, Magnus Lycka <>
    declaimed the following in comp.lang.python:


    > If you prefer books that are more in Tutorial style, you might want
    > to look at Dive Into Python (try it out in the web version first) or


    I think it's even included in the help system for ActiveState's
    PythonWin release...
    --
    > ============================================================== <
    > | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <
    > | Bestiaria Support Staff <
    > ============================================================== <
    > Home Page: <http://www.dm.net/~wulfraed/> <
    > Overflow Page: <http://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/> <
     
    Dennis Lee Bieber, Nov 14, 2005
    #10
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