python docs search for 'print'

Discussion in 'Python' started by David Hoese, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. David Hoese

    David Hoese Guest

    A friend made me aware of this:
    When a python beginner (2.x) quick searches for "print" on
    docs.python.org, the print function doesn't even come up in the top 20
    results. The print statement isn't even listed as far as I can tell.
    Is there something that can be done about this to make it easier for
    beginners?

    I understand that this is a very basic search and "print" is a very
    common word and a very basic python statement, but it's pretty difficult
    for a beginner to learn when the first 5 results are about the
    disassembler and the next 5 are C functions.

    -Dave
     
    David Hoese, Sep 4, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. David Hoese wrote:

    > A friend made me aware of this:
    > When a python beginner (2.x) quick searches for "print" on
    > docs.python.org, the print function doesn't even come up in the top 20
    > results. The print statement isn't even listed as far as I can tell.
    > Is there something that can be done about this to make it easier for
    > beginners?
    >
    > I understand that this is a very basic search and "print" is a very
    > common word and a very basic python statement, but it's pretty difficult
    > for a beginner to learn when the first 5 results are about the
    > disassembler and the next 5 are C functions.


    If they scroll down they will find, among other entries, "1. Introduction"
    (to the "Python library"), which they should have read in the first place.

    The main problem, as I see it, is that the first search results are Unicode-
    sorted by document title, where uppercase letters come first.

    However, I do not think that posting to this newsgroup will change anything
    there. You should take it to the python.org people instead who are, I am
    sorry to say so, responsible for this mess as well¹ (I have seldom, if
    ever, found anything useful using that search; usually I go by TOC and
    index). There is a "Found a bug?" link at the bottom that appears to be of
    use.

    _____
    ¹ The other mess they created (or allowed to be created) is this mashup of
    newsgroup and mailing list, neither of which works properly, because the
    underlying protocols are not compatible. Add to that the abomination
    that Google Groups has become.
    --
    PointedEars

    Twitter: @PointedEars2
    Please do not Cc: me. / Bitte keine Kopien per E-Mail.
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Sep 4, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 13:58:43 -0400, David Hoese wrote:

    > A friend made me aware of this:
    > When a python beginner (2.x) quick searches for "print" on
    > docs.python.org, the print function doesn't even come up in the top 20
    > results. The print statement isn't even listed as far as I can tell. Is
    > there something that can be done about this to make it easier for
    > beginners?
    >
    > I understand that this is a very basic search and "print" is a very
    > common word and a very basic python statement, but it's pretty difficult
    > for a beginner to learn when the first 5 results are about the
    > disassembler and the next 5 are C functions.


    I sympathise. The search functionality on docs.python.org is frankly
    crap, and the best thing for your friend to do is to learn to use google,
    duckduckgo or some other search engine:

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=python print
    http://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=python print

    In this case, google hits the right Python documentation on the first
    link. Duckduckgo doesn't do nearly so well, but it comes up with a bunch
    of useful third-party links. It does better for searches with fewer

    The second best thing for your friend to do is to learn to read the index
    to the docs, where the print statement is listed:

    http://docs.python.org/reference/index.html

    You can use your browser's Find command to search the page for "print".


    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Sep 4, 2012
    #3
  4. On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 20:27:38 +0200, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:

    > ¹ The other mess they created (or allowed to be created) is this mashup
    > of newsgroup and mailing list, neither of which works properly,



    In what way do they not work properly?


    > because
    > the underlying protocols are not compatible.


    What?

    That is rather like saying that you can't read email via a web interface
    because the http protocol is not compatible with the smtp protocol.


    > Add to that the abomination that Google Groups has become.


    It's always been an abomination, although I understand it is much, much
    worse now. Blame Google for that.


    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Sep 4, 2012
    #4
  5. On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 18:28:31 +0000, Steven D'Aprano wrote:

    > https://www.google.com.au/search?q=python print
    > http://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=python print
    >
    > In this case, google hits the right Python documentation on the first
    > link. Duckduckgo doesn't do nearly so well, but it comes up with a bunch
    > of useful third-party links. It does better for searches with fewer



    Gah! Brain meltdown! DDG does better on searches for Python terms with
    fewer extraneous meanings, e.g. "python print" finds many links about
    fashion, but https://duckduckgo.com/html/?q=python tuple is all about
    Python tuples :)



    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Sep 5, 2012
    #5
  6. On Tuesday, 4 September 2012 23:29:26 UTC+5:30, David Hoese wrote:
    > A friend made me aware of this:
    >
    > When a python beginner (2.x) quick searches for "print" on
    >
    > docs.python.org, the print function doesn't even come up in the top 20
    >
    > results. The print statement isn't even listed as far as I can tell.
    >
    > Is there something that can be done about this to make it easier for
    >
    > beginners?
    >
    >
    >
    > I understand that this is a very basic search and "print" is a very
    >
    > common word and a very basic python statement, but it's pretty difficult
    >
    > for a beginner to learn when the first 5 results are about the
    >
    > disassembler and the next 5 are C functions.
    >
    >
    >
    > -Dave


    I was actually planning to write a bug on this.
    ----------------
    my project which you will *never* *never* contribute to http://code.google.com/p/py2c
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 5, 2012
    #6
  7. On Tuesday, 4 September 2012 23:29:26 UTC+5:30, David Hoese wrote:
    > A friend made me aware of this:
    >
    > When a python beginner (2.x) quick searches for "print" on
    >
    > docs.python.org, the print function doesn't even come up in the top 20
    >
    > results. The print statement isn't even listed as far as I can tell.
    >
    > Is there something that can be done about this to make it easier for
    >
    > beginners?
    >
    >
    >
    > I understand that this is a very basic search and "print" is a very
    >
    > common word and a very basic python statement, but it's pretty difficult
    >
    > for a beginner to learn when the first 5 results are about the
    >
    > disassembler and the next 5 are C functions.
    >
    >
    >
    > -Dave


    I was actually planning to write a bug on this.
    ----------------
    my project which you will *never* *never* contribute to http://code.google.com/p/py2c
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 5, 2012
    #7
  8. David Hoese

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 9/4/2012 11:22 PM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:

    > I was actually planning to write a bug on this.


    If you do, find the right place to submit it.
    bugs.python.org is for issues relating to the cpython repository.'
    I fairly sure that the website search code is not there.

    If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an
    improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere
    complaints are useless.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
     
    Terry Reedy, Sep 5, 2012
    #8
  9. On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 09:35:43 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:
    > On 9/4/2012 11:22 PM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > I was actually planning to write a bug on this.

    >
    >
    >
    > If you do, find the right place to submit it.
    >
    > bugs.python.org is for issues relating to the cpython repository.'
    >
    > I fairly sure that the website search code is not there.
    >
    >
    >
    > If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an
    >
    > improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere
    >
    > complaints are useless.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry Jan Reedy


    I was thinking we could just use Google Site search (it's fast easy to setup and gives good results)
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 5, 2012
    #9
  10. On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 09:35:43 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:
    > On 9/4/2012 11:22 PM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > I was actually planning to write a bug on this.

    >
    >
    >
    > If you do, find the right place to submit it.
    >
    > bugs.python.org is for issues relating to the cpython repository.'
    >
    > I fairly sure that the website search code is not there.
    >
    >
    >
    > If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an
    >
    > improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere
    >
    > complaints are useless.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry Jan Reedy


    I was thinking we could just use Google Site search (it's fast easy to setup and gives good results)
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 5, 2012
    #10
  11. David Hoese

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 9/5/2012 1:22 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    > On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 09:35:43 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:


    >> If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an
    >> improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere
    >> complaints are useless.


    > I was thinking we could just use Google Site search (it's fast easy to
    > setup and gives good results)


    I have the impression that that is what we once did, but maybe not. Or
    maybe that is or was for python.org but not docs.python.org, etc. Ease
    version of the docs needs the search restricted to that version. If you
    can give the way to do the easy setup, with that constraint, that would
    be a positive suggestion, accepted or not.


    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
     
    Terry Reedy, Sep 5, 2012
    #11
  12. On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 15:03:56 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:
    > On 9/5/2012 1:22 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >
    > > On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 09:35:43 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    > >> If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an

    >
    > >> improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere

    >
    > >> complaints are useless.

    >
    >
    >
    > > I was thinking we could just use Google Site search (it's fast easy to

    >
    > > setup and gives good results)

    >
    >
    >
    > I have the impression that that is what we once did, but maybe not. Or
    >
    > maybe that is or was for python.org but not docs.python.org, etc. Ease
    >
    > version of the docs needs the search restricted to that version. If you
    >
    > can give the way to do the easy setup, with that constraint, that would
    >
    > be a positive suggestion, accepted or not.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry Jan Reedy


    Google site search costs 2000$ for 500,000 searches per year and 750$ for 150,000 searches so its quite expensive.
    Also the print function only comes in the third result (python 3.2)
    if you search for "site:docs.python.org/release/3.2 print" the print function is not found at all.
    I think a specialized algorithm would work better.
    I'm going to code an program for this.
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 5, 2012
    #12
  13. On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 15:03:56 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:
    > On 9/5/2012 1:22 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >
    > > On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 09:35:43 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    > >> If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an

    >
    > >> improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere

    >
    > >> complaints are useless.

    >
    >
    >
    > > I was thinking we could just use Google Site search (it's fast easy to

    >
    > > setup and gives good results)

    >
    >
    >
    > I have the impression that that is what we once did, but maybe not. Or
    >
    > maybe that is or was for python.org but not docs.python.org, etc. Ease
    >
    > version of the docs needs the search restricted to that version. If you
    >
    > can give the way to do the easy setup, with that constraint, that would
    >
    > be a positive suggestion, accepted or not.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry Jan Reedy


    Google site search costs 2000$ for 500,000 searches per year and 750$ for 150,000 searches so its quite expensive.
    Also the print function only comes in the third result (python 3.2)
    if you search for "site:docs.python.org/release/3.2 print" the print function is not found at all.
    I think a specialized algorithm would work better.
    I'm going to code an program for this.
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 5, 2012
    #13
  14. On 2012-09-05, Terry Reedy <> wrote:
    > On 9/4/2012 11:22 PM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >
    >> I was actually planning to write a bug on this.

    >
    > If you do, find the right place to submit it.
    > bugs.python.org is for issues relating to the cpython repository.'
    > I fairly sure that the website search code is not there.
    >
    > If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an
    > improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere
    > complaints are useless.


    Making the site's "search" box use Google or somesuch is probably the
    simplest solution. I'm not enough of a web guy to know how to do
    that, but I do know that some sites do handle site search that way.

    --
    Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! I like the way ONLY
    at their mouths move ... They
    gmail.com look like DYING OYSTERS
     
    Grant Edwards, Sep 5, 2012
    #14
  15. David Hoese

    Dave Angel Guest

    On 09/05/2012 01:47 PM, Grant Edwards wrote:
    > On 2012-09-05, Terry Reedy <> wrote:
    >> On 9/4/2012 11:22 PM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >>
    >>> I was actually planning to write a bug on this.

    >> If you do, find the right place to submit it.
    >> bugs.python.org is for issues relating to the cpython repository.'
    >> I fairly sure that the website search code is not there.
    >>
    >> If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an
    >> improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere
    >> complaints are useless.

    > Making the site's "search" box use Google or somesuch is probably the
    > simplest solution. I'm not enough of a web guy to know how to do
    > that, but I do know that some sites do handle site search that way.
    >

    And google has some API's to make it relatively painless. And a license
    form to fill in and send, along with your check.




    --

    DaveA
     
    Dave Angel, Sep 5, 2012
    #15
  16. On 2012-09-05, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    > On 09/05/2012 01:47 PM, Grant Edwards wrote:
    >
    >> Making the site's "search" box use Google or somesuch is probably the
    >> simplest solution. I'm not enough of a web guy to know how to do
    >> that, but I do know that some sites do handle site search that way.
    >>

    > And google has some API's to make it relatively painless. And a
    > license form to fill in and send, along with your check.


    I just saw the posting mentioning the pricing. So it is a simple
    simple solution, but it's probably not cheap enough...

    --
    Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! Yes, but will I
    at see the EASTER BUNNY in
    gmail.com skintight leather at an
    IRON MAIDEN concert?
     
    Grant Edwards, Sep 5, 2012
    #16
  17. Mailergate (was: python docs search for 'print')

    Stephen D'Aprano wrote:

    > On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 20:27:38 +0200, Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    >> ¹ The other mess they created (or allowed to be created) is this mashup
    >> of newsgroup and mailing list, neither of which works properly,

    >
    > In what way do they not work properly?


    Most prominently, threads are completely and utterly borken.

    >> because the underlying protocols are not compatible.

    >
    > What?
    >
    > That is rather like saying that you can't read email via a web interface
    > because the http protocol is not compatible with the smtp protocol.


    Apples and oranges. The problem is gating messages from a mail server to a
    news server and vice-versa without regard to the differences between the
    underlying protocols.

    Netnews User Agents (NUAs, newsreaders), are currently based on [RFC3977]
    and [RFC5536].

    In a Netnews article, a References header field is mandatory for a posting
    that is a follow-up. (Threading by Subject and Date works poorly, if at
    all, so the Specification does not suggest that.) The last element of the
    References header field value has to be a Message-ID specifiying the
    article's precursor. That Message-ID has to match the Message-ID header
    field value of an existing posting, unless it has expired on the target
    newsserver or was canceled (with Supersedes being a special case). The
    In-Reply-To header field (see below) is not allowed there, but it is set by
    some hybrid MUA/NUAs like Mozilla Thunderbird anyway¹.

    Mail User Agents (MUAs, mailreaders), on the other hand, are currently based
    on [RFC5321], [RFC1939], IMAP4 (various RFCs, starting with [RFC1730]), and
    last but not least [RFC5322].

    There are two possible header fields to build a thread of e-mail messages:
    In-Reply-To, and References. Whereas the first header field's value is
    supposed to be a Message-ID and the second one's as described in [RFC5536].
    Few MUAs set both, some set the first one, and many set none of them at all,
    because there is no absolute requirement to set any of them (see [RFC5322],
    section 3.6.4.)

    And then there is utterly borken software – or shall we say utterly borken
    approaches? Consider for example the recent thread with Subject "simple
    client data base" started by Mark R Rivet. The original posting has:

    | User-Agent: ForteAgent/7.00.32.1200

    (posted using a newsreader)

    | […]
    | Message-ID: <>

    Chris Angelico's follow-up to that has

    | In-Reply-To: <>
    | References: <>
    | […]
    | Message-ID: <>
    | […]
    | X-Mailman-Version: 2.1.15

    (apparently posted using a mailreader, gated by python.org's mail software)

    So far, so good. But Peter Otten's follow-up to Chris Angelico's posting
    has

    | References: <>
    | <CAPTjJmpHPE=>
    | […]
    | User-Agent: KNode/4.7.3

    (posted using a newsreader)

    | […]
    | Message-ID: <>

    As you can see, the Message-ID of Chris' posting does not occur in the
    References header field value of Peter's posting, which is caused by
    python.org's SMTP-to-NNTP gating program to set its own Message-ID, ignoring
    the Message-ID of the server where the message was injected. Therefore,
    although it is a followup to Chris' posting, Peter's posting has no
    *technical* (metadata) relation to Chris' posting.

    Instead, it should have

    | References: <>
    | <>
    | […]

    or, better: Chris' posting should have had the original

    | […]
    | Message-ID:
    | <CAPTjJmpHPE=>
    | […]

    (no word-wrap), then the header fields of Peter's posting can stay as they
    are.

    My newsreader (KNode/4.4.11) tries its best to resolve this (short of
    threading by Subject and Date, which does not work; see above) which causes
    Peter's posting to end up as a follow-up to *Mark's* posting instead
    (specified by the only valid Message-ID in the References header). Only
    when you read Peter's posting you realize that it is not a follow-up to
    Mark's at all. Confusion ensues.

    There are a lot of similar examples here. As a result of the Message-ID
    rewriting, in several cases a follow-up even appears as if it was an
    original posting, without any technical (and therefore without any obvious
    visual) relation to the thread it actually belongs to at all, even though
    the precursor has not expired. For example,

    | […]
    | X-Original-To:
    | Delivered-To:
    | […]
    | In-Reply-To: <>
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    | References: <>
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    | Date: Tue, 4 Sep 2012 14:27:35 -0400
    | Subject: Re: python docs search for 'print'
    | From: Joel Goldstick <>
    | To: David Hoese <>
    | Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
    | Cc:
    | […]
    | Newsgroups: comp.lang.python
    | Message-ID: <>
    | […]
    |
    | On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 1:58 PM, David Hoese <> wrote:
    | > […]

    There is no message with Message-ID <> (at least
    not on the newsserver that I use), because that header field value was
    overwritten by the borken gating software that python.org uses. The actual
    message posted by that software is:

    | […]
    | X-Original-To:
    | Delivered-To:
    | […]
    | Date: Tue, 04 Sep 2012 13:58:43 -0400
    | From: David Hoese <>
    | User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10.7;
    | rv:15.0) Gecko/20120824 Thunderbird/15.0
    | […]
    | To:
    | Subject: python docs search for 'print'
    | […]
    | Newsgroups: comp.lang.python
    | Message-ID: <>
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    To further show that this is not a coincidence, and that I am not imagining
    things here, the same problems started to occur when some people of the
    German-speaking Python mailing list at python.org thought it would be a good
    idea to merge that mailing list and the German-speaking newsgroup
    de.comp.lang.python not so long ago, using the same software. As a result,
    that Python newsgroup is a complete mess now, too.

    >> Add to that the abomination that Google Groups has become.

    >
    > It's always been an abomination,


    After they took over the Dejanews archive it was rather OK. You could use
    it with the keyboard, lines were at least automatically wrapped at 80
    columns (but unfortunately, only when sending and there was no preview
    [AFAIK it still isn't]), they removed postings reported as spam, and so
    forth.

    > although I understand it is much, much worse now.


    Now you cannot even use it with the keyboard, the postings are not properly
    word-wrapped when typing or submitting (resulting in lines of 200 characters
    and more). The spam is not removed at all, but only hidden from *Google*
    *Groups* users, which causes it to be distributed on Usenet unchecked unless
    the closest peers of the Google Groups servers happen to employ a suitable
    spam filter, or have at least one dedicated user who runs a killbot.

    > Blame Google for that.


    I do, and I have UDP'd Google Groups since April for that (except follow-ups
    to my postings). However, I am also blaming the people still using it
    without complaining sufficiently, because if they would not use it or would
    complain more often and louder, Google would have to fix it. Unfortunately,
    most people do not even know where they are posting to when they access
    Usenet via Google Groups, so there is little hope for improvement of the
    situation.

    But that is another can of worms entirely.

    __________
    ¹ Recent example: <news:k23c3l$ldn$>

    References:

    [RFC1730] Crispin, M. "INTERNET MESSAGE ACCESS PROTOCOL - VERSION 4"
    (IMAP4). December 1994. <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1730>
    [RFC1939] Myers, J. and Rose, M. "Post Office Protocol - Version 3".
    May 1996. <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1939>
    [RFC3977] Feather, C. "Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)".
    October 2006. <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3977>
    [RFC5321] Klensin, J. "Simple Mail Transfer Protocol" (SMTP).
    October 2008. <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5321>
    [RFC5322] Resnick, P. (ed.) "Internet Message Format".
    October 2008. <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5322>
    [RFC5536] Murchison, K., Lindsey, C., and Kohn, D.
    "Netnews Article Format". November 2009.
    <http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5536>
    --
    PointedEars

    Twitter: @PointedEars2
    Please do not Cc: me. / Bitte keine Kopien per E-Mail.
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Sep 5, 2012
    #17
  18. David Hoese

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 9/5/2012 8:45 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    > On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 15:03:56 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:
    >> On 9/5/2012 1:22 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wednesday, 5 September 2012 09:35:43 UTC+5:30, Terry Reedy wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>> If you do find the right place, you should contribute something to an

    >>
    >>>> improvement. The current search performance is not a secret, so mere

    >>
    >>>> complaints are useless.


    These ever increasing extra blank lines with each quote are obnoxious.
    Consider using a news reader with news.gmane.org instead of google crap.
    Or snip heavily.

    > Google site search costs 2000$ for 500,000 searches per year and 750$ for 150,000 searches so its quite expensive.
    > Also the print function only comes in the third result (python 3.2)
    > if you search for "site:docs.python.org/release/3.2 print" the print function is not found at all.
    > I think a specialized algorithm would work better.
    > I'm going to code an program for this.


    A simple algorithm would be to present index search results first, if
    there are any, and then page search results.

    Then searching print would return
    "Index entries for print:"
    Builtin-functions page
    a couple of others...

    Pages containing print:
    <list of about 150 pages>

    I would not worry about duplication.

    Labeling index results as such would clue people in to the fact that
    they could have looked for the object name in the index. People names
    like 'Lundh' that are not indexed but which appear on several pages
    would give the same result as before.

    Looking at the web page (which I do not normally use), I see that the
    problem is deeper. The left margin of every page have an inviting "Quick
    search" box with text "Enter search terms or a module, class or function
    name." But it does not currently work very well for such object names.
    The index is only available from the main contents page.

    This contrasts with the Windows docs which has an index tab, making the
    index directly available from *anywhere*. (There is also a separate text
    search tab.) I think an index search box should be added above the text
    search box. I will ask on pydev where the suggestion should go.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
     
    Terry Reedy, Sep 5, 2012
    #18
  19. David Hoese

    Walter Hurry Guest

    On Wed, 05 Sep 2012 15:03:16 -0400, Terry Reedy wrote:

    > On 9/5/2012 8:45 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:

    <snip>

    > These ever increasing extra blank lines with each quote are obnoxious.
    > Consider using a news reader with news.gmane.org instead of google crap.
    > Or snip heavily.


    +1. And the duplicated posts. Enough of him. Bozo bin it is.
     
    Walter Hurry, Sep 5, 2012
    #19
  20. On Thursday, 6 September 2012 01:54:45 UTC+5:30, Walter Hurry wrote:
    > On Wed, 05 Sep 2012 15:03:16 -0400, Terry Reedy wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 9/5/2012 8:45 AM, Ramchandra Apte wrote:

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >
    >
    > > These ever increasing extra blank lines with each quote are obnoxious.

    >
    > > Consider using a news reader with news.gmane.org instead of google crap.

    >
    > > Or snip heavily.

    >
    >
    >
    > +1. And the duplicated posts. Enough of him. Bozo bin it is.


    I really don't know why Google Groups is double-posting.
     
    Ramchandra Apte, Sep 6, 2012
    #20
    1. Advertising

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