Python source code easy to hack?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Jayden, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. Jayden

    Jayden Guest

    Dear All,

    I have a concern in developing commercial code with Python. Someone told me that its program can be easily hacked to get its source code. Is it really the case? Any way to protect your source code?

    Thanks a lot!

    Jayden
    Jayden, Sep 28, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 28/09/2012 12:57, Jayden wrote:
    > Dear All,
    >
    > I have a concern in developing commercial code with Python. Someone told me that its program can be easily hacked to get its source code. Is it really the case? Any way to protect your source code?
    >
    > Thanks a lot!
    >
    > Jayden
    >


    This question has been asked on numerous occasions so if you search the
    archives you're sure to get loads of answers.

    --
    Cheers.

    Mark Lawrence.
    Mark Lawrence, Sep 28, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jayden

    zig-zag Guest

    On 09/28/2012 02:17 PM, Mark Lawrence wrote:
    > On 28/09/2012 12:57, Jayden wrote:
    >> Dear All,
    >>
    >> I have a concern in developing commercial code with Python. Someone
    >> told me that its program can be easily hacked to get its source code.
    >> Is it really the case? Any way to protect your source code?
    >>
    >> Thanks a lot!
    >>
    >> Jayden
    >>

    >
    > This question has been asked on numerous occasions so if you search the
    > archives you're sure to get loads of answers.
    >


    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/261638/how-do-i-protect-python-code
    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/164137/how-do-i-deploy-a-python-desktop-application
    zig-zag, Sep 28, 2012
    #3
  4. Jayden

    Jerry Hill Guest

    On Fri, Sep 28, 2012 at 10:18 AM, <> wrote:
    > Python bytecode is not easier to hack than Java or .NET bytecodes.


    This is true, but both java and .net are also relatively easy to decompile.

    In general though, why does it matter? What are you trying to protect
    yourself against? If you're including secrets in your code like
    encryption keys or bank account numbers, there's no way to keep them
    out of the hands of a determined attacker that has access to your
    file, no matter what language it may be written in.

    If you must keep anyone from ever seeing how your code works, the only
    way to do that is to keep all the sensitive bits running on a machine
    that you control. Typically, you would do that by distributing a
    client portion of your application, and also running a web service.
    Then you can have your client connect to the web service, request that
    the sensitive calculations, or money transfer, or whatever, be done on
    the server, and just pass back the results.

    --
    Jerry
    Jerry Hill, Sep 28, 2012
    #4
  5. On 9/28/2012 9:19 AM, wrote:
    > kl. 16:38:10 UTC+2 fredag 28. september 2012 skrev Jerry Hill følgende:
    >
    >> This is true, but both java and .net are also relatively easy to decompile.

    > Neither of them are very "obfuscated".
    >
    >
    >> In general though, why does it matter?

    > Paranoia among managers?
    >
    >
    >> What are you trying to protect yourself against?


    Embarassment?

    Patent trolls?

    Unauthorized access to priviledged features?

    Industrial espionage?

    Sounds like a web solution is the best way. Use a thin client and run your NSA-level code on a server. It's worth pointing out though that even c/c++ isn't free. If someone wants to decompile or disassemble your code bad enough, it's going to happen.


    >> If you must keep anyone from ever seeing how your code works, the only way to do that is to keep all the sensitive bits running on a machine that you control.

    > Indeed :)
    >
    >
    >
    > Sturla



    --
    Take care,
    Ty
    http://tds-solutions.net
    The aspen project: a barebones light-weight mud engine:
    http://code.google.com/p/aspenmud
    He that will not reason is a bigot; he that cannot reason is a fool; he that dares not reason is a slave.
    Littlefield, Tyler, Sep 28, 2012
    #5
  6. Jaydenæ–¼ 2012å¹´9月28日星期五UTC+8下åˆ7時57分14秒寫é“:
    > Dear All,
    >
    >
    >
    > I have a concern in developing commercial code with Python. Someone told me that its program can be easily hacked to get its source code. Is it really the case? Any way to protect your source code?
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks a lot!
    >
    >
    >
    > Jayden


    Nowadays high priced commercial IDE software products shipped with a
    built in interpreter with some GUI to let users customize their own
    needs in designs. This also means examples in source codes to
    be provided, too.

    Anyway even compiled instructions can be iced and reverse engineered
    for all the flows of the software.
    88888 Dihedral, Sep 28, 2012
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Hazzard
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    636
    Hazzard
    Apr 6, 2004
  2. Robert Buck
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    448
    Robert Buck
    Feb 24, 2004
  3. Bruno Desthuilliers
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    383
    Bruno Desthuilliers
    Aug 29, 2007
  4. Roy Smith

    Clever hack or code abomination?

    Roy Smith, Dec 1, 2011, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    388
    John Ladasky
    Dec 6, 2011
  5. Tim Chase
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    68
    Tim Chase
    Mar 27, 2014
Loading...

Share This Page