Question re ASP vs PHP

Discussion in 'HTML' started by M, Aug 3, 2007.

  1. M

    M Guest

    Further to my recent inquiries about server-side scripting, it seems that
    the web host for my friend's business site doesn't have PHP installed but
    does have ASP (which I understand to be the Microsoft equivalent).

    My impression is that I can't install PHP myself -- it's something the web
    host has to do, correct?

    Second question: How much does ASP differ from PHP?

    These questions may sound naive as I'm pretty murky about server-side stuff.
    .. .

    M
    M, Aug 3, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. ..oO(M)

    >Further to my recent inquiries about server-side scripting, it seems that
    >the web host for my friend's business site doesn't have PHP installed but
    >does have ASP (which I understand to be the Microsoft equivalent).
    >
    >My impression is that I can't install PHP myself -- it's something the web
    >host has to do, correct?


    Correct.

    >Second question: How much does ASP differ from PHP?


    66.6% ...

    A != P
    S != H
    P == P

    SCNR

    In fact, they are two entirely different languages, but of course both
    can be useful if you know how to deal with them. If you can do something
    in one language, you can do it in the other as well. It all depends on
    what's available on the server and your personal preferences.

    Micha
    Michael Fesser, Aug 3, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. M

    J.O. Aho Guest

    M wrote:

    > My impression is that I can't install PHP myself -- it's something the web
    > host has to do, correct?


    Thats right, the server side scripting language has to be enabled on the
    webserver, or else the scripts are forwarded in plain text.


    > Second question: How much does ASP differ from PHP?


    As much as basic from a modula2 like language.
    One of the major things is that PHP you cfan run on the majority of operating
    system, while asp you are limited to microsft servers (with some exceptions),
    so the day you think of switching to another host, you may have to start all
    over again. I do suggest you take and select another host.


    --

    //Aho
    J.O. Aho, Aug 3, 2007
    #3
  4. Michael Fesser wrote:

    > In fact, they are two entirely different languages, but of course both
    > can be useful if you know how to deal with them.


    Technically ASP is not a language: it is a framework within which
    languages operate. The two most commonly used languages within ASP are
    VBScript and JScript. Perl is also popular. PHP is, IIRC, a possibility,
    though quite experimental.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    [Geek of HTML/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python/Apache/Linux]
    [OS: Linux 2.6.12-12mdksmp, up 44 days, 52 min.]

    Command Line Interfaces, Again
    http://tobyinkster.co.uk/blog/2007/08/02/command-line-again/
    Toby A Inkster, Aug 3, 2007
    #4
  5. M wrote:

    > My impression is that I can't install PHP myself


    If your host supports CGI, then it may be possible, but probably more
    effort than it's worth. Get them to change hosts.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    [Geek of HTML/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python/Apache/Linux]
    [OS: Linux 2.6.12-12mdksmp, up 44 days, 54 min.]

    Command Line Interfaces, Again
    http://tobyinkster.co.uk/blog/2007/08/02/command-line-again/
    Toby A Inkster, Aug 3, 2007
    #5
  6. "M" <> writes:

    > My impression is that I can't install PHP myself -- it's something the web
    > host has to do, correct?


    Correct?

    > Second question: How much does ASP differ from PHP?


    How much does English differ from Swahili? :)

    sherm--

    --
    Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
    Sherm Pendley, Aug 3, 2007
    #6
  7. M

    Brian Cryer Guest

    "M" <> wrote in message
    news:QoJsi.25946$_d2.7711@pd7urf3no...
    > Further to my recent inquiries about server-side scripting, it seems that
    > the web host for my friend's business site doesn't have PHP installed but
    > does have ASP (which I understand to be the Microsoft equivalent).


    Yes, ASP came from Microsoft. I believe ports are available for Unix
    platforms which means there is no reason why ASP can't be available for both
    Unix and Windows hosts.

    > My impression is that I can't install PHP myself -- it's something the web
    > host has to do, correct?
    >
    > Second question: How much does ASP differ from PHP?
    >
    > These questions may sound naive as I'm pretty murky about server-side
    > stuff.


    I think others have covered most aspects of this. Just a couple of points:

    1. PHP is available for both Unix and Windows hosts. Since its free for the
    hosting company to install, there shouldn't be any reason why its not
    available for all hosts. Might be worth asking them whether they could
    supply PHP.

    2. ASP has been superseeded by ASP.NET. This means in practise that ASP is
    obsolete and (in my opinion) not worth learning.

    If you are new to this then don't go the ASP route. (ASP.NET yes, but then
    that limits you to Windows hosting which is more expensive.)
    --
    Brian Cryer
    www.cryer.co.uk/brian
    Brian Cryer, Aug 5, 2007
    #7
  8. M

    Tarscher Guest

    On 5 aug, 18:58, "Brian Cryer" <brian.cr...@127.0.0.1.ntlworld.com>
    wrote:
    > "M" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:QoJsi.25946$_d2.7711@pd7urf3no...
    >
    > > Further to my recent inquiries about server-side scripting, it seems that
    > > the web host for my friend's business site doesn't have PHP installed but
    > > does have ASP (which I understand to be the Microsoft equivalent).

    >
    > Yes, ASP came from Microsoft. I believe ports are available for Unix
    > platforms which means there is no reason why ASP can't be available for both
    > Unix and Windows hosts.
    >
    > > My impression is that I can't install PHP myself -- it's something the web
    > > host has to do, correct?

    >
    > > Second question: How much does ASP differ from PHP?

    >
    > > These questions may sound naive as I'm pretty murky about server-side
    > > stuff.

    >
    > I think others have covered most aspects of this. Just a couple of points:
    >
    > 1. PHP is available for both Unix and Windows hosts. Since its free for the
    > hosting company to install, there shouldn't be any reason why its not
    > available for all hosts. Might be worth asking them whether they could
    > supply PHP.
    >
    > 2. ASP has been superseeded by ASP.NET. This means in practise that ASP is
    > obsolete and (in my opinion) not worth learning.
    >
    > If you are new to this then don't go the ASP route. (ASP.NET yes, but then
    > that limits you to Windows hosting which is more expensive.)
    > --
    > Brian Cryerwww.cryer.co.uk/brian


    I assume you want to compare ASP.NET and PHP? They are actually
    incomparable because ASP.NET is a framework and PHP is a programming
    language. You should compare ASP.NET to a framework that uses PHP
    (CakePhp for example).

    I both used ASP.NET and PHP (not a framework though) extensively and I
    both don't like them:
    - PHP has no consistency and is insecure. The object oriented model of
    PHP4 is really, very, very, very bad. Although they improved it since
    version 5 I think. On the other hand PHP has a very low learning curve
    and a very big community. It's also open source.
    - ASP.NET is overly complex and you need a heavy, bloated IDE for it
    (Visual Studio). ASP.NET also uses strongly typed languages which need
    a lot of compile time before you want to see changes you made. This
    makes development cumbersome although Microsoft is working on
    scripting language support for .NET and thus ASP (Python and Ruby).
    Another drawback is that the learning curve is quite hard but this is
    actually the case with most frameworks (vs languages). positive note:
    ASP.NET is driven by the .NET framework which, in my opinion, is
    great.
    Tarscher, Aug 6, 2007
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Ted Zeng
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    474
    Tim Arnold
    Oct 3, 2006
  2. Ted Zeng
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    602
    Ted Zeng
    Oct 13, 2006
  3. torque63
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    587
    torque63
    Jan 1, 2009
  4. raviraj joshi
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    295
    raviraj joshi
    Jul 4, 2009
  5. Rajive Narain
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,538
    Rajive Narain
    Sep 18, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page