RDBMS selection

Discussion in 'Java' started by Martin Gregorie, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. I'm about to write a database app using Java/JDBC The DB requirements
    are pretty straight: transactions, foreign keys, RI, soft DBK
    generation, cursors but no need for stored procedures or triggers.

    The app will consist of a scheduled update that runs every day for
    minutes rather than hours and an ad-hoc query that will be used rather
    less often with little or no overlap with the update task. IOW, the
    database will be idle much longer than it will be busy.

    I'm intending to use either Postgresql or Derby and I'm interested in
    the resource consumption of these two when they are idle:
    - Postgresql runs as a permanent daemon, so does it absorb RAM or cycles
    when its idle or does it swap out entirely?
    - Derby can run as a permanent daemon but it can also be used as part of
    the app, which would not use any resource when idle but startup and
    shutdown time becomes an issue

    Any feedback of experience round this area would be helpful.

    BTW, this is posted to both c.l.j.p and u.c.o.l because both NGs have
    knowledgeable members on this topic but, I suspect, little overlap
    amongst their regulars.


    --
    martin@ | Martin Gregorie
    gregorie. | Essex, UK
    org |
    Martin Gregorie, Apr 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. Martin Gregorie

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <>, Martin Gregorie
    ('') wrote:

    > I'm about to write a database app using Java/JDBC The DB requirements
    > are pretty straight: transactions, foreign keys, RI, soft DBK
    > generation, cursors but no need for stored procedures or triggers.
    >
    > The app will consist of a scheduled update that runs every day for
    > minutes rather than hours and an ad-hoc query that will be used rather
    > less often with little or no overlap with the update task. IOW, the
    > database will be idle much longer than it will be busy.


    The answer is write your application for as near as possible ANSI 92 SQL,
    and use JDBC. Then you can try both Postgres and Derby solutions and
    choose which one seems better to you.

    My preference is Postgres (and has been for twelve years now) - but I write
    all my SQL source files using a set of text macros which cover all the
    main areas where databases typically diverge from ANSI 92, so that it's
    exceedingly easy to switch to a different backend.

    http://pres.cvs.sourceforge.net/pres/pres/src/sql/babelql.pp?revision=1.5&view=markup

    Doing anything which hardwires your dependence on a particular database
    engine is a bad idea, in my opinion.

    --
    (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; I can't work yanks out......
    ;; Why do they frown upon sex yet relish violence?
    ;; Deep Fried Lettuce
    Simon Brooke, Apr 24, 2007
    #2
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  3. Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    > Doing anything which hardwires your dependence on a particular database
    > engine is a bad idea, in my opinion.
    >

    Thanks for your comments. I know ODBC tolerably well, but this will be
    my first JDBC project.

    I've been intending to do the typical ODBC trick of using a common SQL
    subset from within the Java programs and accepting that DBMS management
    scripts and the schema definition would probably not be particularly
    portable.

    I'll start off using Postgres (it was installed when I installed FC6).
    I've been reading its manuals and I'm impressed with what I've seen so far.


    --
    martin@ | Martin Gregorie
    gregorie. | Essex, UK
    org |
    Martin Gregorie, Apr 25, 2007
    #3
  4. Martin Gregorie wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    > >
    >> Doing anything which hardwires your dependence on a particular database
    >> engine is a bad idea, in my opinion.
    >>

    > Thanks for your comments. I know ODBC tolerably well, but this will be
    > my first JDBC project.
    >
    > I've been intending to do the typical ODBC trick of using a common SQL
    > subset from within the Java programs and accepting that DBMS management
    > scripts and the schema definition would probably not be particularly
    > portable.
    >
    > I'll start off using Postgres (it was installed when I installed FC6).
    > I've been reading its manuals and I'm impressed with what I've seen so
    > far.
    >
    >


    Postgres over JDBC seems to work reliably IME so it's a fairly safe bet.

    Read up on pg_dump so you can get your database back when you trask it :)

    Cheers

    Tim
    Tim Southerwood, Apr 25, 2007
    #4
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