Re: A good IDE for a beginner ...

Discussion in 'Java' started by BJ, Apr 15, 2005.

  1. BJ

    BJ Guest

    I can recommend TJI (www.kinabaloo.com). It's small (1.3 Mbytes, so
    fast to download), but with many features including Swing GUI builders,
    a web server for servlets and JSP, and a JDBC enabled database. Yet
    it's so easy to use that you probably won't need to look at the guide !

    What I like best about it is its 'Java Guru' - this let's you find
    information from the Java APIs incredibly quickly - and in a way that's
    much more efficient than browsing the HTML files. The main parts work
    without the HTML API documentation being installed, but to get fuller
    descriptions of classes and methods you will need to download the SDK
    documentation from Sun's Java site if you don't already have it.

    Another great feature is that it automatically saves a sequence of
    backups for each source file - you can view and revert to these backups
    if you wish. Want to get back that method you wrote several days ago
    because actually it works better than the new one (!) - with TJI you
    can.

    Then there's many other useful features - syntax checking, text
    folding, auto import, 'implement listener' (select from list), UML
    class diagrams, example projects, automatic project documentation (a
    bit like JavaDoc but nearly instant), debugging, basic refactoring ...
    But the feel of using TJI is far different from the 'heavyweight' IDEs
    - convenience without complication.

    So, any downsides? I find the editor a bit slow with very large files -
    but then again, my computer is 5 years old! And that prompts me to
    reorganise my code into a better design ;)
     
    BJ, Apr 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. My vote goes to JBuilder. Can be expensive depending on what edition
    you get, but they have a free downloadable version.

    -Ramon
     
    Ramon F Herrera, Apr 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    > My vote goes to JBuilder. Can be expensive depending on what edition
    > you get, but they have a free downloadable version.
    >
    > -Ramon
    >

    For lightweight IDEs take a look at jEdit (reviewed here:
    http://www.techbookreport.com/tbr0135.html) or for a Windows only
    environment there's always JCreator (reviewed here:
    http://www.techbookreport.com/tbr0013.html).

    And of course there's always for a big beastie there's always Eclipse
    (http://www.eclipse.org).


    ======================================================================
    TechBookReport Java http://www.techbookreport.com/JavaIndex.html
     
    TechBookReport, Apr 15, 2005
    #3
  4. BJ

    IchBin Guest

    TechBookReport wrote:
    > Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >
    >> My vote goes to JBuilder. Can be expensive depending on what edition
    >> you get, but they have a free downloadable version.
    >>
    >> -Ramon
    >>

    > For lightweight IDEs take a look at jEdit (reviewed here:
    > http://www.techbookreport.com/tbr0135.html) or for a Windows only
    > environment there's always JCreator (reviewed here:
    > http://www.techbookreport.com/tbr0013.html).
    >
    > And of course there's always for a big beastie there's always Eclipse
    > (http://www.eclipse.org).
    >
    >
    > ======================================================================
    > TechBookReport Java http://www.techbookreport.com/JavaIndex.html

    My vote, for a beginner goes to JGRASP at:

    http://www.eng.auburn.edu/department/cse/research/grasp/index.html

    jGRASP is a lightweight development environment, created specifically to
    provide automatic generation of software visualizations for the purpose
    of improving the comprehensibility of software. jGRASP is implemented in
    Java, and runs on all platforms with a Java Virtual Machine (Java
    version 1.3 or higher). jGRASP produces CSD diagrams for Java, C, C++,
    Objective-C, Ada, and VHDL; CPG diagrams for Java and Ada; UML diagrams
    for Java; and has an integrated debugger and workbench for Java.

    jGRASP 1.8.0 Beta introduces a new, cleaner interface, with a single
    menu, toolbar, and messagebar (new settings allow configuring multiple
    menus, toolbars, or messagebars). Support for J2ME projects (using WTK)
    has been added. New Java object viewers for arrays and Java collections
    classes have been added.

    The jGRASP 1.7.1 release added more support for Java 1.5 features. CSD
    generation now fully supports Java 1.5 syntax. The UML diagram shows
    enums and generic signatures for classes, fields, and methods. The Java
    debugger and workbench show full generic signatures with replacements
    whenever possible, and allow the user to specify generic type arguments
    when creating a class instance.

    --


    Thanks in Advance...
    IchBin
    __________________________________________________________________________

    'The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical
    substances:
    if there is any reaction, both are transformed.'
    - Carl Gustav Jung, (1875-1961), psychiatrist and psychologist
     
    IchBin, Apr 15, 2005
    #4
  5. BJ

    anon Guest

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 13:59:00 -0400, IchBin wrote:

    > TechBookReport wrote:
    >> Ramon F Herrera wrote:
    >>
    >>> My vote goes to JBuilder. Can be expensive depending on what edition
    >>> you get, but they have a free downloadable version.
    >>>
    >>> -Ramon
    >>>


    I have been using Oracle's jdevelop. It seems to resemble jbuilder and
    there is also a free downloadable version. Worth looking at if you have
    trouble installing your first choice as I had.

    Regards J.
     
    anon, Apr 16, 2005
    #5
  6. BJ

    Guest

    , Apr 22, 2005
    #6
  7. BJ

    Guest

    , Apr 22, 2005
    #7
  8. BJ

    Gaz Guest

    wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Try NitroX JSP IDE, NitroX Struts IDE or the free NitroX JSP Editor.
    >>NitroX is based on eclipse - which is quite popular.
    >>
    >>Both include a great JSP Editor which has received great reviews
    >>(google review m7 nitrox) and blog entries:
    >>http://dev2dev.bea.com/blog/gnyberg/archive/2005/04/choosing_a_jsps_1.html
    >>
    >>The JSP Editor is FREE (at this time)

    >
    >
    > BlueJ! BlueJ!
    >
    > http://www.bluej.org/
    >
    > It's free.
    >
    >


    I like netbeans (not too sure about 4.0 loved 3.6) www.netbeans.org
     
    Gaz, Apr 22, 2005
    #8
  9. BJ

    BJ Guest

    The latest version of TJI (22.3) now runs on Mac OS X, as well as the
    usual suspects! A new feature is the 'AppletRunner' - a faster, cooler
    replacement for AppletViewer.

    http://www.kinabaloo.com/ide.jar


    BJ wrote:
    > I can recommend TJI (www.kinabaloo.com). It's small (1.3 Mbytes, so
    > fast to download), but with many features including Swing GUI

    builders,
    > a web server for servlets and JSP, and a JDBC enabled database. Yet
    > it's so easy to use that you probably won't need to look at the guide

    !
     
    BJ, Apr 29, 2005
    #9
  10. BJ

    BJ Guest

    The latest version of TJI (22.4) has run-time tracing - logs the
    entries and exits of all constructors and methods, the time spent in
    each, and the creation and assignment of every variable (objects and
    primitives) in all scopes. Great for debugging.

    BJ wrote:
    > The latest version of TJI (22.3) now runs on Mac OS X, as well as the
    > usual suspects! A new feature is the 'AppletRunner' - a faster,

    cooler
    > replacement for AppletViewer.
    >
    > http://www.kinabaloo.com/ide.jar
    >
     
    BJ, May 2, 2005
    #10
  11. BJ

    SilenType Guest

    On 2005-05-02 00:18:27 -0400, "BJ" <> said:

    > The latest version of TJI (22.4) has run-time tracing - logs the
    > entries and exits of all constructors and methods, the time spent in
    > each, and the creation and assignment of every variable (objects and
    > primitives) in all scopes. Great for debugging.
    >
    > BJ wrote:
    >> The latest version of TJI (22.3) now runs on Mac OS X, as well as the
    >> usual suspects! A new feature is the 'AppletRunner' - a faster,

    > cooler
    >> replacement for AppletViewer.
    >>
    >> http://www.kinabaloo.com/ide.jar


    check sourceforge.net for opensource IDE's like Judo for beginners and
    Jipeand others
     
    SilenType, Aug 12, 2005
    #11
  12. SilenType wrote:

    > check sourceforge.net for opensource IDE's like Judo for beginners and
    > Jipeand others


    Or look at Netbeans. It is free and high quality.

    Then there is Eclipse, also free and high quality.

    --
    Kenneth P. Turvey <>
     
    Kenneth P. Turvey, Aug 12, 2005
    #12
  13. BJ

    IchBin Guest

    Kenneth P. Turvey wrote:
    > SilenType wrote:
    >
    >> check sourceforge.net for opensource IDE's like Judo for beginners and
    >> Jipeand others

    >
    > Or look at Netbeans. It is free and high quality.
    >
    > Then there is Eclipse, also free and high quality.
    >


    Or, for a beginner, try either of these academic developed IDE's..

    JGRASP - http://www.jgrasp.org/

    BlueJ - http://www.bluej.org/

    --


    Thanks in Advance...
    IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.servebeer.com
    __________________________________________________________________________

    'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
    -William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
     
    IchBin, Aug 12, 2005
    #13
  14. On 2005-08-12, Kenneth P. Turvey penned:
    >
    > Then there is Eclipse, also free and high quality.


    I adore Eclipse, but for a beginner, the whole issue of projects and
    workspaces is rather daunting. For a "Hello, world" app, I'd think
    the beginner's favorite text editor would be best.


    --
    monique

    Ask smart questions, get good answers:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
     
    Monique Y. Mudama, Aug 12, 2005
    #14
  15. "IchBin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Kenneth P. Turvey wrote:
    >> SilenType wrote:
    >>
    >>> check sourceforge.net for opensource IDE's like Judo for beginners and
    >>> Jipeand others

    >>
    >> Or look at Netbeans. It is free and high quality. Then there is Eclipse,
    >> also free and high quality.
    >>

    >
    > Or, for a beginner, try either of these academic developed IDE's..
    >
    > JGRASP - http://www.jgrasp.org/
    >
    > BlueJ - http://www.bluej.org/


    I used BlueJ in a course I recently taught. Both I
    and the students liked it very much. Easy to learn.
    Easy to get started.
     
    George Cherry, Aug 13, 2005
    #15
  16. BJ

    IchBin Guest

    George Cherry wrote:
    > "IchBin" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Kenneth P. Turvey wrote:
    >>> SilenType wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> check sourceforge.net for opensource IDE's like Judo for beginners and
    >>>> Jipeand others
    >>> Or look at Netbeans. It is free and high quality. Then there is Eclipse,
    >>> also free and high quality.
    >>>

    >> Or, for a beginner, try either of these academic developed IDE's..
    >>
    >> JGRASP - http://www.jgrasp.org/
    >>
    >> BlueJ - http://www.bluej.org/

    >
    > I used BlueJ in a course I recently taught. Both I
    > and the students liked it very much. Easy to learn.
    > Easy to get started.
    >
    >


    Since this thread was started back in 04/14/205. May be the OP could
    respond and close this thread by his selection of an IDE for his
    beginner development in Java.

    --


    Thanks in Advance...
    IchBin, Pocono Lake, Pa, USA http://weconsultants.servebeer.com
    __________________________________________________________________________

    'If there is one, Knowledge is the "Fountain of Youth"'
    -William E. Taylor, Regular Guy (1952-)
     
    IchBin, Aug 13, 2005
    #16
  17. "Monique Y. Mudama" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2005-08-12, Kenneth P. Turvey penned:
    >>
    >> Then there is Eclipse, also free and high quality.

    >
    > I adore Eclipse, but for a beginner, the whole issue of projects and
    > workspaces is rather daunting. For a "Hello, world" app, I'd think
    > the beginner's favorite text editor would be best.


    This is only an issue for IDEs that require a project and
    workspace. jGRASP, for example, can work "projectless"
    and a default workspace is initially active. You can just
    load up a Java file, hit the compile button, and hit the run
    button.
     
    Larry Barowski, Aug 13, 2005
    #17
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