Re: Can anyone write this recursion for simple regexp morebeautifully and clearly than the braggarts

Discussion in 'C++' started by gavino, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. gavino

    gavino Guest

    On Sep 1, 7:20 pm, spinoza1111 <> wrote:
    > On Sep 1, 11:25 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > In <>,

    >
    > > spinoza1111wrote:
    > > > On Aug 30, 2:30 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:

    > > <snip>

    >
    > > >> In the current case, bolega (unknown name, to me at least) is
    > > >> slagging off Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike (both names known to me)
    > > >> and their book (which I've read). He starts with the word
    > > >> "braggart", and the rest is similar ranting. It's just perfectly
    > > >> normal bilgewater of the

    >
    > > > Don't make mock of my patronym

    >
    > > From Chambers: "*bilge* noun 1a the broadest part of a ship's bottom;
    > > b (usually bilges) the lowermost parts on the inside of a ship's
    > > hull, below the floorboards. 2 (also bilge-water) the dirty water
    > > that collects in a ship's bilge. 3 /rather dated colloq/ rubbish,
    > > nonsense, drivel."

    >
    > > I can see why you might object to the use of the neologism
    > > "nilgewater", but I see no sensible reason for objecting to the
    > > perfectly normal word "bilgewater". One might reasonably object to a
    > > particular application thereof in a given context, but the word
    > > itself is surely unobjectionable.

    >
    > Well, Dickon,
    >
    > What think'st thou Norfolke.
    > Nor. A good direction warlike Soueraigne,
    > This found I on my Tent this Morning.
    > Iockey of Norfolke, be not so bold,
    > For Dickon thy maister is bought and sold.
    >
    > I still object to "bilge", etc., because you are like a child making
    > fun of my patronym.
    >
    > You are a dull Fellowe
    > With a streak of bright Yellowe
    > Who when he loses an argument
    > Says 'tis not what I meant,
    > And who makes a child's game
    > Out of a person's father's name
    > Because unlike myself
    > Thou hast no Pelf
    > In the wealthe that lieth in words
    > Your posties they are for the birds.
    > A Yank can yank your chaine
    > And cause you paine, knowing he
    > More than you about your paternitie,
    > The English language you have lost.
    >
    > Jockey of Heathfield, be not so bold
    > We're tired of you, and you're gettin' old.
    >
    >
    >
    > > <snip>

    >
    > > --
    > > Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    > > Email: -http://www. +rjh@
    > > "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    > > Sig line vacant - apply within

    >
    >


    wow you brits crack me, no wonder been at war for 300 years
     
    gavino, Sep 2, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. gavino

    spinoza1111 Guest

    On Sep 2, 3:28 pm, gavino <> wrote:
    > On Sep 1, 7:20 pm,spinoza1111<> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sep 1, 11:25 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:

    >
    > > > In <>,

    >
    > > > spinoza1111wrote:
    > > > > On Aug 30, 2:30 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:
    > > > <snip>

    >
    > > > >> In the current case, bolega (unknown name, to me at least) is
    > > > >> slagging off Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike (both names known to me)
    > > > >> and their book (which I've read). He starts with the word
    > > > >> "braggart", and the rest is similar ranting. It's just perfectly
    > > > >> normal bilgewater of the

    >
    > > > > Don't make mock of my patronym

    >
    > > > From Chambers: "*bilge* noun 1a the broadest part of a ship's bottom;
    > > > b (usually bilges) the lowermost parts on the inside of a ship's
    > > > hull, below the floorboards. 2 (also bilge-water) the dirty water
    > > > that collects in a ship's bilge. 3 /rather dated colloq/ rubbish,
    > > > nonsense, drivel."

    >
    > > > I can see why you might object to the use of the neologism
    > > > "nilgewater", but I see no sensible reason for objecting to the
    > > > perfectly normal word "bilgewater". One might reasonably object to a
    > > > particular application thereof in a given context, but the word
    > > > itself is surely unobjectionable.

    >
    > > Well, Dickon,

    >
    > > What think'st thou Norfolke.
    > > Nor. A good direction warlike Soueraigne,
    > > This found I on my Tent this Morning.
    > > Iockey of Norfolke, be not so bold,
    > > For Dickon thy maister is bought and sold.

    >
    > > I still object to "bilge", etc., because you are like a child making
    > > fun of my patronym.

    >
    > > You are a dull Fellowe
    > > With a streak of bright Yellowe
    > > Who when he loses an argument
    > > Says 'tis not what I meant,
    > > And who makes a child's game
    > > Out of a person's father's name
    > > Because unlike myself
    > > Thou hast no Pelf
    > > In the wealthe that lieth in words
    > > Your posties they are for the birds.
    > > A Yank can yank your chaine
    > > And cause you paine, knowing he
    > > More than you about your paternitie,
    > > The English language you have lost.

    >
    > > Jockey of Heathfield, be not so bold
    > > We're tired of you, and you're gettin' old.

    >
    > > > <snip>

    >
    > > > --
    > > > Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    > > > Email: -http://www. +rjh@
    > > > "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    > > > Sig line vacant - apply within

    >
    > wow you brits crack me, no wonder been at war for 300 years- Hide quoted text -


    Hey, Reading Rainbow, I'm a Yank, and it says so in the post. I am
    carrying the battle to the enemy as did John Paul Jones when he
    invaded Britain during the Revolutionary war.


    >
    > - Show quoted text -
     
    spinoza1111, Sep 2, 2009
    #2
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  3. gavino

    luserXtrog Guest

    On Sep 2, 5:09 am, spinoza1111 <> wrote:
    > On Sep 2, 3:28 pm, gavino <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sep 1, 7:20 pm,spinoza1111<> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Sep 1, 11:25 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:

    >
    > > > > In <>,

    >
    > > > > spinoza1111wrote:
    > > > > > On Aug 30, 2:30 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:
    > > > > <snip>

    >
    > > > > >> In the current case, bolega (unknown name, to me at least) is
    > > > > >> slagging off Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike (both names known to me)
    > > > > >> and their book (which I've read). He starts with the word
    > > > > >> "braggart", and the rest is similar ranting. It's just perfectly
    > > > > >> normal bilgewater of the

    >
    > > > > > Don't make mock of my patronym

    >
    > > > > From Chambers: "*bilge* noun 1a the broadest part of a ship's bottom;
    > > > > b (usually bilges) the lowermost parts on the inside of a ship's
    > > > > hull, below the floorboards. 2 (also bilge-water) the dirty water
    > > > > that collects in a ship's bilge. 3 /rather dated colloq/ rubbish,
    > > > > nonsense, drivel."

    >
    > > > > I can see why you might object to the use of the neologism
    > > > > "nilgewater", but I see no sensible reason for objecting to the
    > > > > perfectly normal word "bilgewater". One might reasonably object to a
    > > > > particular application thereof in a given context, but the word
    > > > > itself is surely unobjectionable.

    >
    > > > Well, Dickon,

    >
    > > > What think'st thou Norfolke.
    > > > Nor. A good direction warlike Soueraigne,
    > > > This found I on my Tent this Morning.
    > > > Iockey of Norfolke, be not so bold,
    > > > For Dickon thy maister is bought and sold.

    >
    > > > I still object to "bilge", etc., because you are like a child making
    > > > fun of my patronym.

    >
    > > > You are a dull Fellowe
    > > > With a streak of bright Yellowe
    > > > Who when he loses an argument
    > > > Says 'tis not what I meant,
    > > > And who makes a child's game
    > > > Out of a person's father's name
    > > > Because unlike myself
    > > > Thou hast no Pelf
    > > > In the wealthe that lieth in words
    > > > Your posties they are for the birds.
    > > > A Yank can yank your chaine
    > > > And cause you paine, knowing he
    > > > More than you about your paternitie,
    > > > The English language you have lost.

    >
    > > > Jockey of Heathfield, be not so bold
    > > > We're tired of you, and you're gettin' old.

    >
    > > > > <snip>

    >
    > > > > --
    > > > > Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    > > > > Email: -http://www. +rjh@
    > > > > "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    > > > > Sig line vacant - apply within

    >
    > > wow you brits crack me, no wonder been at war for 300 years- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > Hey, Reading Rainbow, I'm a Yank, and it says so in the post. I am
    > carrying the battle to the enemy as did John Paul Jones when he
    > invaded Britain during the Revolutionary war.
    >


    The dude from Zeppelin?!

    --
    appendix
     
    luserXtrog, Sep 2, 2009
    #3
  4. gavino

    spinoza1111 Guest

    On Sep 2, 8:10 pm, luserXtrog <> wrote:
    > On Sep 2, 5:09 am,spinoza1111<> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sep 2, 3:28 pm, gavino <> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Sep 1, 7:20 pm,spinoza1111<> wrote:

    >
    > > > > On Sep 1, 11:25 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:

    >
    > > > > > In <>,

    >
    > > > > > spinoza1111wrote:
    > > > > > > On Aug 30, 2:30 pm, Richard Heathfield <> wrote:
    > > > > > <snip>

    >
    > > > > > >> In the current case, bolega (unknown name, to me at least) is
    > > > > > >> slagging off Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike (both names known to me)
    > > > > > >> and their book (which I've read). He starts with the word
    > > > > > >> "braggart", and the rest is similar ranting. It's just perfectly
    > > > > > >> normal bilgewater of the

    >
    > > > > > > Don't make mock of my patronym

    >
    > > > > > From Chambers: "*bilge* noun 1a the broadest part of a ship's bottom;
    > > > > > b (usually bilges) the lowermost parts on the inside of a ship's
    > > > > > hull, below the floorboards. 2 (also bilge-water) the dirty water
    > > > > > that collects in a ship's bilge. 3 /rather dated colloq/ rubbish,
    > > > > > nonsense, drivel."

    >
    > > > > > I can see why you might object to the use of the neologism
    > > > > > "nilgewater", but I see no sensible reason for objecting to the
    > > > > > perfectly normal word "bilgewater". One might reasonably object to a
    > > > > > particular application thereof in a given context, but the word
    > > > > > itself is surely unobjectionable.

    >
    > > > > Well, Dickon,

    >
    > > > > What think'st thou Norfolke.
    > > > > Nor. A good direction warlike Soueraigne,
    > > > > This found I on my Tent this Morning.
    > > > > Iockey of Norfolke, be not so bold,
    > > > > For Dickon thy maister is bought and sold.

    >
    > > > > I still object to "bilge", etc., because you are like a child making
    > > > > fun of my patronym.

    >
    > > > > You are a dull Fellowe
    > > > > With a streak of bright Yellowe
    > > > > Who when he loses an argument
    > > > > Says 'tis not what I meant,
    > > > > And who makes a child's game
    > > > > Out of a person's father's name
    > > > > Because unlike myself
    > > > > Thou hast no Pelf
    > > > > In the wealthe that lieth in words
    > > > > Your posties they are for the birds.
    > > > > A Yank can yank your chaine
    > > > > And cause you paine, knowing he
    > > > > More than you about your paternitie,
    > > > > The English language you have lost.

    >
    > > > > Jockey of Heathfield, be not so bold
    > > > > We're tired of you, and you're gettin' old.

    >
    > > > > > <snip>

    >
    > > > > > --
    > > > > > Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk>
    > > > > > Email: -http://www. +rjh@
    > > > > > "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
    > > > > > Sig line vacant - apply within

    >
    > > > wow you brits crack me, no wonder been at war for 300 years- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > Hey, Reading Rainbow, I'm a Yank, and it says so in the post. I am
    > > carrying the battle to the enemy as did John Paul Jones when he
    > > invaded Britain during the Revolutionary war.

    >
    > The dude from Zeppelin?!


    Oh never mind...eye roll...deep, deep sigh...crotch grab...
    >
    > --
    > appendix- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
     
    spinoza1111, Sep 2, 2009
    #4
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