RE: Case sensitive and ludicrous statements

Discussion in 'Python' started by Robert Brewer, Dec 8, 2003.

  1. Douglas Alan wrote:
    > IfCamelCaseWereAGoodIdeaEvenInACaseSensitiveLanguage,thenPeopl
    > eWouldWriteLike
    > ThisAllTheTime.


    The Greeks did that quite often. Some ideas take time.


    FuManChu
    Robert Brewer, Dec 8, 2003
    #1
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  2. Robert Brewer

    Douglas Alan Guest

    "Robert Brewer" <> writes:

    > Douglas Alan wrote:


    >> IfCamelCaseWereAGoodIdeaEvenInACaseSensitiveLanguage,thenPeopl
    >> eWouldWriteLike
    >> ThisAllTheTime.


    > The Greeks did that quite often. Some ideas take time.


    Yeah, well they couldn't even tell the difference between a "U" and a
    "V".

    Oops, that was the Romans. My bad.

    |>oug
    Douglas Alan, Dec 8, 2003
    #2
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  3. Robert Brewer

    Mark Jackson Guest

    "Robert Brewer" <> writes:
    > Douglas Alan wrote:
    > > IfCamelCaseWereAGoodIdeaEvenInACaseSensitiveLanguage,thenPeopl
    > > eWouldWriteLike
    > > ThisAllTheTime.

    >
    > The Greeks did that quite often. Some ideas take time.


    [.sig from February 1993]

    Re. CamelCase and SmallTalk: ISTR that the Alto keyboard lacked an
    underscore character (I believe the character code was used for
    left-arrow, which I vaguely recall was used for assignment in BCPL
    and/or Mesa). As constructions like foo_bar are the obvious
    alternative to FooBar, could this lack have been a factor at PARC?

    --
    Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
    Consistently separating words by spaces became a general custom about the tenth
    century A.D., and lasted until about 1957, when FORTRAN abandoned the practice.
    - Sun FORTRAN Reference Manual
    Mark Jackson, Dec 8, 2003
    #3
  4. Robert Brewer

    Douglas Alan Guest

    (Mark Jackson) writes:

    > Re. CamelCase and SmallTalk: ISTR that the Alto keyboard lacked an
    > underscore character (I believe the character code was used for
    > left-arrow, which I vaguely recall was used for assignment in BCPL
    > and/or Mesa). As constructions like foo_bar are the obvious
    > alternative to FooBar, could this lack have been a factor at PARC?


    That sounds plausible. I think I also remember using a computer at
    some point that didn't have an underscore character. It's hard to
    come up with another explanation -- the Smalltalk folk where way too
    smart to have done something that on the face of things is quite
    silly.

    |>oug
    Douglas Alan, Dec 8, 2003
    #4
  5. Robert Brewer

    Cy Edmunds Guest

    "Mark Jackson" <> wrote in message
    news:br0m9h$qn2$...
    > "Robert Brewer" <> writes:
    > > Douglas Alan wrote:
    > > > IfCamelCaseWereAGoodIdeaEvenInACaseSensitiveLanguage,thenPeopl
    > > > eWouldWriteLike
    > > > ThisAllTheTime.

    > >
    > > The Greeks did that quite often. Some ideas take time.

    >
    > [.sig from February 1993]
    >
    > Re. CamelCase and SmallTalk: ISTR that the Alto keyboard lacked an
    > underscore character (I believe the character code was used for
    > left-arrow, which I vaguely recall was used for assignment in BCPL
    > and/or Mesa). As constructions like foo_bar are the obvious
    > alternative to FooBar, could this lack have been a factor at PARC?
    >
    > --
    > Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
    > Consistently separating words by spaces became a general custom about

    the tenth
    > century A.D., and lasted until about 1957, when FORTRAN abandoned the

    practice.
    > - Sun FORTRAN Reference Manual
    >
    >


    You're right Mark. Mesa mapped the underscore to left arrow, which was used
    for assignment. I suppose this was an improvement over Pascal's := except
    that ItMadeYouWriteLikeThis.

    --
    Cy
    http://home.rochester.rr.com/cyhome/
    Cy Edmunds, Dec 9, 2003
    #5
  6. Robert Brewer

    Mark Jackson Guest

    "Cy Edmunds" <> writes:
    > "Mark Jackson" <> wrote in message
    > news:br0m9h$qn2$...


    > > Re. CamelCase and SmallTalk: ISTR that the Alto keyboard lacked an
    > > underscore character (I believe the character code was used for
    > > left-arrow, which I vaguely recall was used for assignment in BCPL
    > > and/or Mesa). As constructions like foo_bar are the obvious
    > > alternative to FooBar, could this lack have been a factor at PARC?


    > You're right Mark. Mesa mapped the underscore to left arrow, which was used
    > for assignment. I suppose this was an improvement over Pascal's := except
    > that ItMadeYouWriteLikeThis.


    [Good morning, Cy. Bridge?]

    And I see by the Smalltalk-80 book I have here that Smalltalk makes use
    of the left arrow as well.

    This all suggests that the "standard PARC character set" lacked the
    underscore. (As far as I can tell the only other variation from
    standard ASCII was the replacement of the carat "^" with an up-arrow.)
    I wonder how far back that goes - the Nova-based POLOS system? MAXC?

    --
    Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
    Logic doesn't apply to the real world. - Marvin Minsky
    Mark Jackson, Dec 9, 2003
    #6
  7. Robert Brewer

    Mark Jackson Guest

    Bruno Desthuilliers <> writes:
    > Mark Jackson wrote:


    > > Re. CamelCase and SmallTalk: ISTR that the Alto keyboard lacked an
    > > underscore character (I believe the character code was used for
    > > left-arrow, which I vaguely recall was used for assignment in BCPL
    > > and/or Mesa). As constructions like foo_bar are the obvious
    > > alternative to FooBar, could this lack have been a factor at PARC?
    > >

    >
    > I don't know about the Alto keyboard (I've heard of alto saxophone, but
    > I guess this is OT ?-)


    From the tenor of your remarks I gather you may not be not familiar with

    http://www.computerhistory.org/exhibits/highlights/alto.page

    > but on a french keyboard, I have to type ctl +
    > alt + 8 for the underscore. Camel case notation only implies using the
    > shift key. GuessWhichOneHasMyPreference ?


    I feel your pain, once having been faced with programming on an Intel
    system on whose one terminal "backspace" was a shifted function. Since
    I don't type entirely without error. . . .

    (To bring this full circle: my solution was to use the Alto serial
    interface and hook one up as a second terminal!)

    --
    Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
    Logic doesn't apply to the real world. - Marvin Minsky
    Mark Jackson, Dec 11, 2003
    #7
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