Re: CLI Java Glitch

Discussion in 'Java' started by Roedy Green, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. Roedy Green

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 14:24:53 -0700, Gene Wirchenko <>
    wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

    >C:\cbs2dev\test>java helloworld
    >Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: helloworld
    >(wrong nam


    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/helloworld.html

    Java is case sensitive. Case matters.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    http://mindprod.com
    One of the great annoyances in programming derives from the irregularity
    of English spelling especially when you have international teams.
    I want to find a method or variable, but I don't know precisely
    how its is spelled or worded. English is only approximately phonetic.
    Letters are randomly doubled. The dictionary often lists variant spellings.
    British, Canadian and American spellings differ.I would like to see an
    experiment where variable names were spelled in a simplified English, where
    there were no double letters.I also think you could add a number of rules
    about composing variable names so that a variable name for something would
    be highly predictable. You would also need automated enforcement of the
    rules as well as possible.
     
    Roedy Green, Jun 21, 2011
    #1
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  2. Roedy Green

    Eric Sosman Guest

    On 6/20/2011 7:55 PM, Roedy Green wrote:
    > On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 14:24:53 -0700, Gene Wirchenko<>
    > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
    >
    >> C:\cbs2dev\test>java helloworld
    >> Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: helloworld
    >> (wrong nam

    >
    > see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/helloworld.html
    >
    > Java is case sensitive. Case matters.


    Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?

    (Actually, I've already seen one, in a very weak sense. It was a
    C compiler that completely ignored reverse-video characters in its
    input -- and that emitted reverse-video error messages directly into
    the source it was compiling. Convenient for one particular use case,
    but not what you'd call "scalable" ...)

    --
    Eric Sosman
    d
     
    Eric Sosman, Jun 21, 2011
    #2
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  3. On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 20:44:04 -0400, Eric Sosman
    <> wrote:

    >On 6/20/2011 7:55 PM, Roedy Green wrote:
    >> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 14:24:53 -0700, Gene Wirchenko<>
    >> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
    >>
    >>> C:\cbs2dev\test>java helloworld
    >>> Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: helloworld
    >>> (wrong nam

    >>
    >> see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/helloworld.html
    >>
    >> Java is case sensitive. Case matters.

    >
    > Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?
    >
    > (Actually, I've already seen one, in a very weak sense. It was a
    >C compiler that completely ignored reverse-video characters in its
    >input -- and that emitted reverse-video error messages directly into
    >the source it was compiling. Convenient for one particular use case,
    >but not what you'd call "scalable" ...)


    I can see why. I took a couple of courses of COBOL. When
    viewing compilation listings, it was very tempting to start
    correcting.

    I ended up writing a program that converted a compilation listing
    back to source. A few people did doubletakes when they saw me editing
    the compilation listing. And I did help one fellow student recover
    his source when he had accidentally deleted that instead of the
    listing.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
     
    Gene Wirchenko, Jun 21, 2011
    #3
  4. Roedy Green

    Paul Cager Guest

    On Jun 21, 1:44 am, Eric Sosman <> wrote:
    >      Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?


    Wasn't Algol-68 font-sensitive? I seem to remember that reserved words
    were required by the language spec to be *bold*. Of course you
    couldn't do bold on punched cards so compilers had conventions such as
    using single quotes in place of boldened text.
     
    Paul Cager, Jun 21, 2011
    #4
  5. Roedy Green

    Silvio Guest

    On 06/21/2011 11:34 AM, Paul Cager wrote:
    > On Jun 21, 1:44 am, Eric Sosman<> wrote:
    >> Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?

    >
    > Wasn't Algol-68 font-sensitive? I seem to remember that reserved words
    > were required by the language spec to be *bold*. Of course you
    > couldn't do bold on punched cards so compilers had conventions such as
    > using single quotes in place of boldened text.


    Yes, the language spec used bold for keywords. The implementation we
    used on an IBM370 used upper-case instead.
     
    Silvio, Jun 21, 2011
    #5
  6. Roedy Green

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 20:44:04 -0400, Eric Sosman
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
    someone who said :

    > Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?


    Regexes would be a heck of a lot simpler if the expressions were font
    or colour sensitive. You would use one colour for data and one for
    commands. Instead of \n you would type that see echoed some sort of
    single-width newline glyph.
    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    http://mindprod.com
    One of the great annoyances in programming derives from the irregularity
    of English spelling especially when you have international teams.
    I want to find a method or variable, but I don't know precisely
    how its is spelled or worded. English is only approximately phonetic.
    Letters are randomly doubled. The dictionary often lists variant spellings.
    British, Canadian and American spellings differ.I would like to see an
    experiment where variable names were spelled in a simplified English, where
    there were no double letters.I also think you could add a number of rules
    about composing variable names so that a variable name for something would
    be highly predictable. You would also need automated enforcement of the
    rules as well as possible.
     
    Roedy Green, Jun 21, 2011
    #6
  7. Roedy Green

    Gavino Guest

    "Paul Cager" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >Wasn't Algol-68 font-sensitive? I seem to remember that reserved words
    >were required by the language spec to be *bold*. Of course you
    >couldn't do bold on punched cards so compilers had conventions such as
    >using single quotes in place of boldened text.


    That's right. In the Algol 68 jargon, the different conventions were known
    as "stropping regimes".
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algol68#Program_representation
     
    Gavino, Jun 21, 2011
    #7
  8. On Tue, 21 Jun 2011 11:59:11 -0700, Roedy Green
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 20:44:04 -0400, Eric Sosman
    ><> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
    >someone who said :
    >
    >> Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?

    >
    >Regexes would be a heck of a lot simpler if the expressions were font
    >or colour sensitive. You would use one colour for data and one for
    >commands. Instead of \n you would type that see echoed some sort of
    >single-width newline glyph.


    Huh? Which is the data, and which is the commands? It is all
    characters to be parsed.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
     
    Gene Wirchenko, Jun 21, 2011
    #8
  9. Roedy Green

    BGB Guest

    On 6/21/2011 1:03 PM, Gene Wirchenko wrote:
    > On Tue, 21 Jun 2011 11:59:11 -0700, Roedy Green
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 20:44:04 -0400, Eric Sosman
    >> <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted
    >> someone who said :
    >>
    >>> Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?

    >>
    >> Regexes would be a heck of a lot simpler if the expressions were font
    >> or colour sensitive. You would use one colour for data and one for
    >> commands. Instead of \n you would type that see echoed some sort of
    >> single-width newline glyph.

    >
    > Huh? Which is the data, and which is the commands? It is all
    > characters to be parsed.
    >


    presumably, the editor would insert some sort of markup or annotations,
    and the compiler would parse these.

    the issue though would be to avoid being overly slowed down by the types
    of user-interface design issues which plague traditional HTML WYSIWYG
    editors...

    hmm... source code as HTML, and using Mozilla/SeaMonkey Composer as the
    text editor...

    imagine the fun...
     
    BGB, Jun 21, 2011
    #9
  10. Roedy Green

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 6/20/2011 8:44 PM, Eric Sosman wrote:
    > On 6/20/2011 7:55 PM, Roedy Green wrote:
    >> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 14:24:53 -0700, Gene Wirchenko<>
    >> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
    >>
    >>> C:\cbs2dev\test>java helloworld
    >>> Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: helloworld
    >>> (wrong nam

    >>
    >> see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/helloworld.html
    >>
    >> Java is case sensitive. Case matters.

    >
    > Any bets on when we'll see a font-sensitive programming language?


    It will not happen as long as source code is expected to be
    Unicode or earlier text.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Jul 22, 2011
    #10
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