RE: Fastest web framework

Discussion in 'Python' started by Andriy Kornatskyy, Oct 16, 2012.

  1. Demian,

    Thank you, see below.

    > I think that my first batch of questions were slightly out of context,
    > mostly due to a lack of caffeine first thing in the morning. My
    > understanding at the time was that your "an answer to effectivity" was,
    > in fact, a list of highlights for wheezy.web (which is why I asked the
    > questions I did). Having said that..
    >
    > > The initial decisions taken while building a project might be wrong.

    > Due to continues backward compatibility, you can not change them even
    > you wish.
    >
    > You can always deprecate old functionality in favor of new solutions.
    > I'd be hard pressed to find a reason to find a reason why something
    > *can't* be deprecated. It may not be easy at times, but it should always
    > be doable.


    And that is the problem. Some can not deprecate and die (see pylons, now pyramid). Some can not die nor deprecate (see django).

    > > That glue is usability case: recommendation how to use it with one or

    > the other.
    >
    > As long as your framework doesn't require you to fight with it in order
    > to use another solution. One of my early gripes with Django for example
    > (ages ago) was that it felt like I had to fight the framework in order
    > to introduce functionality that wasn't natively supported.
    >
    > > For you, personally, let me point this again. N.P.
    > >
    > > Here is how: use content caching with cache dependency. Read more:
    > > http://packages.python.org/wheezy.http/userguide.html#content-cache

    >
    > It doesn't matter if you're using cached content or not. It will *not*
    > be as fast as a hard-coded, simple response (not that a static,
    > hard-coded response is the way to go obviously). I don't think I have to
    > get into the details about I/O. My point is simply that the statement
    > that a database driven site (cached content or not), *can not* be as
    > fast as a "hello world" app. My comment may be construed as being
    > nit-picky, but I thought it was worth calling out due to the
    > matter-of-fact wording that you used.


    It does. There is certain level after which performance of `hello world` will not differ from real world application. The hardware I used got that limit at 22-24K per second. That is why I made isolated benchmarks. See difference between wsgi sample and others.

    http://mindref.blogspot.com/2012/09/python-fastest-web-framework.html

    > On a somewhat unrelated note, I caught a minor typo in the content-cache
    > docs:
    >
    > "Since there is no heavy processing and just simple operation to get an
    > item from cache it should be supper fast"
    >
    > I don't know about you, but my supper generally isn't fast ;)


    You will see. Thanks. supper => super ;-)

    Somewhat later in a week there will be another benchmark for... caching.

    Take care.

    Andriy
    Andriy Kornatskyy, Oct 16, 2012
    #1
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