Re: General question about Python design goals

Discussion in 'Python' started by Jean-Paul Calderone, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. On 27 Nov 2005 19:49:26 -0800, Paul Rubin <"http://phr.cx"@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    >Robert Kern <> writes:
    >> Use cases are the primary tool for communicating those practical
    >> needs. If you can't think of a single use case, what's the point of
    >> implementing something? Or rather, why should someone else implement
    >> it if you don't know how you would use it?

    >
    >I can't think of a single use case for the addition (+) operator
    >working where either of the operands happens to be the number
    >0x15f1ef02d9f0c2297e37d44236d8e8ddde4a34c96a8200561de00492cb94b82 (a
    >random number I just got out of /dev/urandom). I've never heard of
    >any application using that number, and the chances of it happening by
    >coincidence are impossibly low. But if Python were coded in a way
    >that made the interpreter crash on seeing that number, I'd call that
    >a bug needing fixing.


    If you seriously believe what you just wrote, you have failed to
    understand the phrase "use case" (and possibly a lot of other
    things related to programming ;)

    However (fortunately for you) I suspect you don't. If you really
    did, you may want to pick up one of those platitude-filled XP books
    and give it a careful read. You may find there's more there than
    you were previously aware.

    Jean-Paul
     
    Jean-Paul Calderone, Nov 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jean-Paul Calderone

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Jean-Paul Calderone <> writes:
    > >I can't think of a single use case for the addition (+) operator
    > >working where either of the operands happens to be the number
    > >0x15f1ef02d9f0c2297e37d44236d8e8ddde4a34c96a8200561de00492cb94b82 (a
    > >random number I just got out of /dev/urandom).

    >
    > If you seriously believe what you just wrote, you have failed to
    > understand the phrase "use case" (and possibly a lot of other
    > things related to programming ;)


    Heh, you must not remember the famous Pentium FDIV bug, where the
    Pentium gave incorrect results for floating point division with
    certain rare combinations of operands. Intel at first refused to
    acknowledge that the bug was a real problem (although it had already
    been found and quietly fixed in later steppings), then refused to
    replace people CPU's unless they could explain their use case where
    the error could cause them a practical problem. My school's biology
    lab got its Pentiums exchanged by claiming it was using them to model
    some kind of experimental drug treatment (I don't know whether the
    claim was true) but other people just got told: sorry, but what you're
    doing doesn't need correct FDIV results. Intel of course eventually
    had to back down and exchange everyone's cpu's after a huge public
    outcry.

    > However (fortunately for you) I suspect you don't. If you really
    > did, you may want to pick up one of those platitude-filled XP books
    > and give it a careful read. You may find there's more there than
    > you were previously aware.


    I've read some of the XP stuff. I see it mostly as a way of
    explaining normal programmers' instincts to PHB's. If the books did
    some good in reducing PHB interference in some projects, that's nice;
    however, while I felt that the general approach to programming running
    through them was good, the specific practices and the type of
    following they got bordered on cultish.
     
    Paul Rubin, Nov 28, 2005
    #2
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