Re: Is Python a commercial proposition ?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Rodrick Brown, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. On Jul 29, 2012, at 8:54 PM, Andrew Berg <> wrote:

    > On 7/29/2012 7:12 PM, Rodrick Brown wrote:
    >> Python is a glue language much like Perl was 10 years ago. Until the
    >> GIL is fixed I doubt anyone will seriously look at Python as an option
    >> for large enterprise standalone application development.

    > The GIL is neither a bug to be fixed nor an inherent part of the
    > language. It is a design choice for CPython. There are reasons the
    > CPython devs have no intention of removing the GIL (at least in the near
    > future). A recent outline of these reasons (written by one of the
    > CPython devs) is here:
    >
    > http://python-notes.boredomandlazin...the-gil-is-more-important-than-fixing-unicode


    Hence the reason why no one will seriously look at Python for none
    glue work or simple web apps. When it comes to designing complex
    applications that need to exploit large multicore systems Python just
    isn't an option.

    Its still not possible to be a pure Python developer and find gainful
    employment today.

    > --
    > CPython 3.3.0b1 | Windows NT 6.1.7601.17803
    > --
    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    Rodrick Brown, Jul 30, 2012
    #1
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  2. Rodrick Brown

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Rodrick Brown <> writes:
    > Hence the reason why no one will seriously look at Python for none
    > glue work or simple web apps. When it comes to designing complex
    > applications that need to exploit large multicore systems Python just
    > isn't an option.


    That's wrong, I've run multicore apps in Python, by just using separate
    processes. There was no GIL issue, just separate processes for each
    core. The cpython interpreter is so slow that the GIL is usually not
    the bottleneck anyway. For lots of applications this just doesn't
    matter since the app is either not cpu-intensive or (in my case) all the
    work is done in native libraries.

    > Its still not possible to be a pure Python developer and find gainful
    > employment today.


    Certainly any serious programmer should be good in multiple languages,
    and in fact I got to write a little bit of C code at work a few months
    ago, but it wasn't really needed. The program is all Python.
    Paul Rubin, Jul 30, 2012
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  3. Rodrick Brown

    alex23 Guest

    On Jul 30, 12:31 pm, Rodrick Brown <> wrote:
    > Its still not possible to be a pure Python developer and find gainful
    > employment today.


    I have been working as a "pure" Python developer for six+ years now
    (in that the bulk of my coding is done in Python, with some interface
    behaviour in JS). On average, every two months I'm contacted by a
    recruiter or an employer wanting me for my Python experience. I've
    worked for government, education and private industry, and the only
    time I didn't get paid was my last week working for a start-up.

    So I'm pretty confident that I'm "gainfully" employed.
    alex23, Jul 31, 2012
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