Re: Looking for a good memory and CPU profiler

Discussion in 'C++' started by Ian Collins, Nov 27, 2009.

  1. Ian Collins

    Ian Collins Guest

    Johnson wrote:
    > I am at a stage to test the footprint of my projects, such as the CPU
    > usage and memory usage during its running. My project is written in
    > standard c++.
    > Could anybody please recommend a memory and CPU profiler, easy to learn,
    > better open-source and free?


    Such tool are invariably tool-chain or platform specific, so you should
    try asking in a more relevant forum.

    --
    Ian Collins
    Ian Collins, Nov 27, 2009
    #1
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  2. Johnson schrieb:
    > Andy Champ wrote:
    > Thank you, Andy, I am using Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition. Does it
    > have the tools you mentioned?


    No, only Visual Studio Team System has it.
    André Schreiter, Nov 30, 2009
    #2
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  3. Johnson wrote:
    > Thank you all very much for sharing. It seems that I have at least the
    > following 4 choices.
    > 1. AMD CodeAnalyst
    > 2. Valgrind
    > 3. Intel vTune Performance Analyze
    > 4. Visual Studio Profiler
    >
    > I got a few more questions though and looking for help.
    >
    > 1) Is AMD CodeAnalyst able to be integrated into Visual Studio C++
    > Express Edition instead of Visual C++ 2008 Edition? Same question for
    > Valgrind.


    Ask in a Visual Studio newsgroup. I don't think there is Valgrind for
    Windows.

    > 2) From AMD's website, it doesn't say that this profiler can be used for
    > CPUs/Processors other than AMD's. Do you think that I can use this
    > profiler for x86-based processors and ARM processors?


    I think AMD tech support knows the answer.

    > 3) My friend told me two other profilers, Visual Studio Profiler
    > (integrated in the team edition), and Intel vTune Performance Analyze.
    > Have you ever tried them and do you like them?


    Yes. And, sort of. VTune is a fine tool, and it takes some time to get
    proficient with it (as I recall, it may have changed). The built-in
    profiler is, well, not as capable. Usable, still.

    > 4 Which one is better in terms of both performance and learning curve,
    > of the above?


    The built-in one is the easiest, I think.

    > I want to find a tools that is easy to learn and use, and
    > support both x-86 processors and ARM processor.


    Try AutomatedQA's AQtime. (www.automatedqa.com)

    There are two more I've looked at, LTProf and GlowCode. The former is
    light and inexpensive. The latter got me through some code that VTune
    choked on. I since switched to AQtime and never looked back.

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
    Victor Bazarov, Nov 30, 2009
    #3
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