Re: MPG link - QuickTime problem

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Sean, Oct 21, 2004.

  1. Sean

    Sean Guest

    Look. I'm not trying to do anything evil on the user's computer.
    Thanks for your help, but I think you missed the point. It's quite
    simple, really.

    I have a webpage on a CD that I will be distributing. The page has
    links to mpg files on the CD. I want the user to be able to click the
    link and it plays the mpg, in a different window (browser or
    application) so that when it finished, the CD contents page is still
    showing and he can click on another one.

    The link behaves differently on different computers, obviously. I've
    only tried it on two, mine and another computer. That's how
    development works, Spartanicus - you do something, and then you test
    it. What kind of stupid snide comment were you trying to make by
    saying "Who is it for, you or others?"?? By that logic, am I supposed
    to test the software on EVERY user's computer that is ever going to
    use it?

    Apologies for the offence, but I didn't appreciate the 'high-horse'
    tone of either of your replies. I do appreciate the help, though.

    Because the file is so big, it takes ages to load into QuickTime
    (where it is embedded in a browser window), whereas Win Media Player
    plays it immediately. Waiting 5 minutes is not creating a good "user
    experience". I appreciate user's have their own settings for a reason;
    I was just wondering if there was anything I could do to make the damn
    thing work better.

    I take it the answer is an emphatic "No"?!




    Spartanicus <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > (Sean) wrote:
    >
    > >I've written an HTML page that has a link to an MPG file, to be burned
    > >onto a "Demo CD". The MPG file is quite big - 500MB.

    >
    > Why? If it is to be retrieved via the Internet then surely you can
    > compress it using a more appropriate format. Broadband users will
    > appreciate it since it makes retrieval much faster, and it costs them
    > less or consumes less of their download allowance, and it may become
    > usable for non broadband clients also, unlike currently.
    >
    > >On my computer, it works fine

    >
    > Who is it for, you or others? If it's for others then what it does when
    > you access it from your local file system is irrelevant.
    >
    > > - clicking the link opens up Windows Media Player, which
    > >starts showing the video. But on another computer, the link opens up a
    > >new browser page, and shows the video as an embedded QuickTime video.

    >
    > It's up to each client how it want's to handle content, don't interfere
    > with that choice. Mpeg videos can be played with pretty much all media
    > players, leave the user to decide which he likes best.
    >
    > >The problem is (I think this might be QuickTime's fault) that it takes
    > >about 5 minutes before it starts showing the video. I think QuickTime
    > >must load or buffer the whole file. This is not good - I need the
    > >video to start playing immediately.

    >
    > First compress the content appropriately, secondly linking directly to
    > the video content *should* result in a full download before playback
    > commences. Some formats other than MPEG video have associated redirector
    > formats that can initiate streaming:
    > http://www.spartanicus.utvinternet.ie/streaming.htm
    >
    > >Is there anything wrong with the HTML link? Is there any way I can
    > >force the system to a) not use QuickTime or b)

    >
    > None of your business.
    >
    > >not embed the image

    >
    > Unlikely to happen, but again none of your business.
    >
    > >or c) prompt the user as to what to do??

    >
    > Same again.
    Sean, Oct 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Sean

    Philip Ronan Guest

    Sean wrote:

    > Because the file is so big, it takes ages to load into QuickTime
    > (where it is embedded in a browser window), whereas Win Media Player
    > plays it immediately.


    That's a bit odd. I'm sure there are things you can do to fix the problem.
    take a look at this, for example:
    <http://www.apple.com/quicktime/tools_tips/tutorials/faststart.html>

    Alternatively, split the video content up into separate chapters with a
    separate HTML page for each one. That way you can add useful features like a
    navigation menu. (I assume your 500 MB video is rather L-O-N-G.).

    What the heck, why not do both?

    --
    Philip Ronan

    (Please remove the "z"s if replying by email)
    Philip Ronan, Oct 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Sean" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Look. I'm not trying to do anything evil on the user's computer.
    > Thanks for your help, but I think you missed the point. It's quite
    > simple, really.
    >
    > I have a webpage on a CD that I will be distributing. The page has
    > links to mpg files on the CD. I want the user to be able to click the
    > link and it plays the mpg, in a different window (browser or
    > application) so that when it finished, the CD contents page is still
    > showing and he can click on another one.
    >
    > The link behaves differently on different computers, obviously. I've
    > only tried it on two, mine and another computer. That's how
    > development works, Spartanicus - you do something, and then you test
    > it. What kind of stupid snide comment were you trying to make by
    > saying "Who is it for, you or others?"?? By that logic, am I supposed
    > to test the software on EVERY user's computer that is ever going to
    > use it?
    >
    > Apologies for the offence, but I didn't appreciate the 'high-horse'
    > tone of either of your replies. I do appreciate the help, though.
    >
    > Because the file is so big, it takes ages to load into QuickTime
    > (where it is embedded in a browser window), whereas Win Media Player
    > plays it immediately. Waiting 5 minutes is not creating a good "user
    > experience".


    And yet, the user has configured his system so that MPG files are played
    using QuickTime. Obviously *he's* satisfied with it. Maybe there's a reason
    for it: maybe he tries to avoid using Microsoft applications whenever
    possible. Maybe he doesn't like Media Player's spyware aspect. Maybe he
    doesn't even have it.

    The question boils down to which is more important: that your users see the
    presentation at all, or that they see it the way you think they should see
    it?

    >I appreciate user's have their own settings for a reason;
    > I was just wondering if there was anything I could do to make the damn
    > thing work better.
    >
    > I take it the answer is an emphatic "No"?!


    More or less.
    Harlan Messinger, Oct 21, 2004
    #3
  4. Sean

    brucie Guest

    In comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html,alt.html Sean said:

    > Look. I'm not trying to do anything evil on the user's computer.


    why the hell not?


    --


    v o i c e s
    brucie, Oct 21, 2004
    #4
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