Re: Name of IDLE on Linux

Discussion in 'Python' started by Jim Benson, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. Jim Benson

    Jim Benson Guest

    On Sat, 2 Apr 2005, Edward Diener wrote:

    > What is the name of the IDLE program on Linux and where is it installed
    > in a normal Linux distribution ? I have installed all the Python 2.3.5
    > RPMs on my Fedora 3 system but I have no idea where they are installed
    > or what IDLE is called. I lloked in the Python web pages to try to find
    > a list of the files in the various installations, but was unable to find
    > the information.
    >


    Try idle (all lower case).
    On my RH-9 system it is in /usr/local/bin

    HTH.

    Jim
    Jim Benson, Apr 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jim Benson wrote:
    > On Sat, 2 Apr 2005, Edward Diener wrote:
    >
    >
    >>What is the name of the IDLE program on Linux and where is it installed
    >>in a normal Linux distribution ? I have installed all the Python 2.3.5
    >>RPMs on my Fedora 3 system but I have no idea where they are installed
    >>or what IDLE is called. I lloked in the Python web pages to try to find
    >>a list of the files in the various installations, but was unable to find
    >>the information.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Try idle (all lower case).
    > On my RH-9 system it is in /usr/local/bin


    Thanks. The system came with Python and the development libraries but
    not with the latest installation and tools. Once I was able to install
    all the latest Python RPM for Fedora 3, 'idle' showed up. Now all I have
    to do is find everything else, including the latest documentation files.
    It is a pity the Python Linux binary installations do not create folders
    on the desktop or in the Gnome menu system with links to the Python to
    the documentation and a readme telling me what executables were installed.
    Edward Diener, Apr 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jim Benson

    Thomas Rast Guest

    Edward Diener <> writes:

    > It is a pity the Python Linux binary installations do not
    > create folders on the desktop or in the Gnome menu system with links
    > to the Python to the documentation and a readme telling me what
    > executables were installed.


    Imagine they did, and the other 1392 packages (on my system) too :)

    Documentation usually resides in /usr/share/doc/<package>,
    /usr/share/doc/packages/<package> or similiar. You're on an RPM-based
    system, so

    $ rpm -ql <package>

    lists all files belonging to that package. You should have little
    trouble spotting the documentation files there.

    - Thomas

    --
    If you want to reply by mail, substitute my first and last name for
    'foo' and 'bar', respectively, and remove '.invalid'.
    Thomas Rast, Apr 2, 2005
    #3
  4. Thomas Rast wrote:
    > Edward Diener <> writes:
    >
    >> It is a pity the Python Linux binary installations do not
    >> create folders on the desktop or in the Gnome menu system with links
    >> to the Python to the documentation and a readme telling me what
    >> executables were installed.

    >
    > Imagine they did, and the other 1392 packages (on my system) too :)


    I can understand that <g>. But I would rather have links somewhere than not
    know what it was a particular package does and how to use it. As a relative
    Linux newbie, I have found it disconcerting to have things installed on my
    system when I first booted the system or when I install new packages or
    upgrade existing ones, and not know what these packages are used for. One
    can always delete links, and they are cheap, so I would rather have too much
    to begin with than too little.

    >
    > Documentation usually resides in /usr/share/doc/<package>,
    > /usr/share/doc/packages/<package> or similiar. You're on an RPM-based
    > system, so
    >
    > $ rpm -ql <package>
    >
    > lists all files belonging to that package. You should have little
    > trouble spotting the documentation files there.


    Thanks. That does help.
    Edward Diener, Apr 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Jim Benson

    Joal Heagney Guest

    Edward Diener wrote:
    > Thomas Rast wrote:
    >
    >>Edward Diener <> writes:
    >>
    >>
    >>>It is a pity the Python Linux binary installations do not
    >>>create folders on the desktop or in the Gnome menu system with links
    >>>to the Python to the documentation and a readme telling me what
    >>>executables were installed.

    >>
    >>Imagine they did, and the other 1392 packages (on my system) too :)

    >
    >
    > I can understand that <g>. But I would rather have links somewhere than not
    > know what it was a particular package does and how to use it. As a relative
    > Linux newbie, I have found it disconcerting to have things installed on my
    > system when I first booted the system or when I install new packages or
    > upgrade existing ones, and not know what these packages are used for. One
    > can always delete links, and they are cheap, so I would rather have too much
    > to begin with than too little.
    >
    >
    >>Documentation usually resides in /usr/share/doc/<package>,
    >>/usr/share/doc/packages/<package> or similiar. You're on an RPM-based
    >>system, so
    >>
    >>$ rpm -ql <package>
    >>
    >>lists all files belonging to that package. You should have little
    >>trouble spotting the documentation files there.

    >
    >
    > Thanks. That does help.
    >
    >

    As a "relative linux newbie" (Aren't we all? I've been using linux for 7
    years now, and the only thing that has happened is that my definition of
    "newbie" has stretched.), you might find the following useful.

    If you're using KDE, you can set a bookmark in konqueror to the
    documentation and it'll bring it up in the bookmark toolbar. Only hassle
    is when you update python and the docs, you have to edit the bookmark.

    Another approach is to type in /usr/share/doc/py into the konqueror URL
    and it'll pop up a list of folders containing python documentation.

    Joal

    PS: DON'T add a general bookmark to /usr/share/doc
    I did that when I was beginning, and every time I went document hunting,
    I'd have to wait a good minute and a half for konqueror to display all
    the folders in this directory.
    Joal Heagney, Apr 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Jim Benson

    Peter Otten Guest

    Joal Heagney wrote:

    > If you're using KDE, you can set a bookmark in konqueror to the
    > documentation and it'll bring it up in the bookmark toolbar. Only hassle
    > is when you update python and the docs, you have to edit the bookmark.


    Or you can bookmark a symlink to the documentation and bookmark that.
    Another goodie are Konqueror's web shortcuts. I added one with the
    URI file:/path_to_python_docs/lib/module-\{@}.html
    and the shortcut pym, and now typing e. g.

    pym os.path

    in the address bar immediately brings up that module's documentation.

    Peter
    Peter Otten, Apr 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Jim Benson

    Guest

    Peter Otten wrote:
    and now typing e. g.
    > pym os.path
    > in the address bar immediately brings up that module's documentation.
    >
    > Peter



    Nice one! Thanks.

    S
    , Apr 4, 2005
    #7
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