Re: new in town

Discussion in 'Python' started by David McNab, Jul 13, 2003.

  1. David McNab

    David McNab Guest

    On Sat, 12 Jul 2003 21:07:48 +0000, Elaine Jackson paused, took a deep
    breath, then came out with:

    > Thank you.


    Elaine,

    Firstly, the McMillan Installer suggested to you is indeed very good, and
    in nearly all cases creates fully standalone packaged apps for windows. If
    ever it fails (rare cases), you can also try py2exe. Getting it to create
    independent runtime packages on Linux could be problematic, but this is
    less of an issue since any decent Linux system has Python installed or
    available on tap.

    Secondly, I can't see why some people accused you of being vague and
    flippant. Your original enquiry was clear enough to me - you want to take
    your python code and turn it into a form where it can be deployed on any
    target system without bothering or confusing users by making them install
    a python environment. A very clear and reasonable ask.

    Do please persist with python, and don't let any pedantry on this group
    get to you. The Python community on the whole is very friendly and
    supportive. Add to this the marvel of a pain-saving language that Python
    is, and you'll be feeling totally at home in a short time.

    You can also get very fast answers to your questions in the IRC channel
    #python on irc.freenode.net. Most people there are very welcoming of newer
    python converts.

    One caveat - please be warned that if you spend more than a little time
    with Python, you'll develop a discomfort and dislike of other languages to
    the point where you won't want to program in anything else. For instance,
    I switched from PHP to Python 6 months ago. I used to like PHP, but I
    can't stand it now. But maybe that's a *good* thing.

    Have fun in your travels.

    Cheers
    David

    >
    > Wayne Pierce <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > | "Elaine Jackson" <> wrote in message
    > news:<AeVPa.445271$>...
    > | > Can Python be compiled? If so, how? (I have the 2.2 version of the
    > interpreter.)
    > | > TIA for any and all helps
    > |
    > | If you want to be able to distribute your Python apps without the end
    > | user needing a Python interpreter take a look at the following:
    > |
    > | http://www.mcmillan-inc.com/install1.html
    > |
    > | Wayne
    David McNab, Jul 13, 2003
    #1
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  2. David McNab

    David McNab Guest

    One more thing Elaine - I may offend others on this list in saying this,
    but if you're doing GUI applications, I strongly suggest that you dive in
    and familiarise yourself with Tkinter. It could well be the only GUI you
    ever need in Python.

    Don't be intimidated if the Tkinter docs you come across urge you to
    approach it from a Tk viewpoint- there's an excellent guide at:
    http://www.astro.washington.edu/owen/TkinterSummary.html

    I argue for Tkinter over another popular Python-accessible GUI, wxWindows,
    because Tkinter is smaller, faster and far less buggy, and has a really
    nice 'feel' within the Python environment.

    David
    David McNab, Jul 13, 2003
    #2
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  3. David McNab

    Cliff Wells Guest

    On Sat, 2003-07-12 at 20:27, David McNab wrote:
    > One more thing Elaine - I may offend others on this list in saying this,
    > but if you're doing GUI applications, I strongly suggest that you dive in
    > and familiarise yourself with Tkinter. It could well be the only GUI you
    > ever need in Python.
    >
    > Don't be intimidated if the Tkinter docs you come across urge you to
    > approach it from a Tk viewpoint- there's an excellent guide at:
    > http://www.astro.washington.edu/owen/TkinterSummary.html
    >
    > I argue for Tkinter over another popular Python-accessible GUI, wxWindows,
    > because Tkinter is smaller, faster and far less buggy, and has a really
    > nice 'feel' within the Python environment.


    Everyone is welcome to prefer whatever toolkit they like. However,
    please don't use false reasons to justify your preference. Smaller?
    Probably. Faster? I suspect the reverse is true, but I'd love to see
    your benchmarking methodology. Less buggy? Very arguable, but I'd be
    willing to concede that point if you concede that the reason for that
    state is because wxWindows more actively developed than Tk <wink>.

    Some *valid* reasons for choosing Tkinter over wxPython would be:

    1. de facto standard for Python (and several other languages)
    2. More widely ported
    3. Somewhat simpler to learn

    Reasons to choose wxPython over Tkinter:
    1. More diverse widget set (hence the size difference)
    2. More flexible framework (hence the higher learning curve)


    Regards,
    Cliff

    --
    Now as the petals are no more, a corroded shrinking stalk remains
    -Bauhaus
    Cliff Wells, Jul 13, 2003
    #3
  4. David McNab <postmaster@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:pan.2003.07.13.03.27.44.711790@127.0.0.1...
    <snip>
    | Don't be intimidated if the Tkinter docs you come across urge you to
    | approach it from a Tk viewpoint- there's an excellent guide at:
    | http://www.astro.washington.edu/owen/TkinterSummary.html
    <snip>
    | David


    Thanks for the tip.
    Elaine Jackson, Jul 13, 2003
    #4
  5. Good luck, Elaine! Fwiw, I have been using wxWindows/wxPython and have
    found it fairly easy to pick up - and I ain't the brightest bulb, if
    you know what I mean. :)

    And what David said about Python becoming the one and only language you
    ever want to use is true. :)

    Mike J.

    In article <bz6Qa.420654$>, Elaine
    Jackson <> wrote:

    > David McNab <postmaster@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    > news:pan.2003.07.13.03.27.44.711790@127.0.0.1...
    > <snip>
    > | Don't be intimidated if the Tkinter docs you come across urge you to
    > | approach it from a Tk viewpoint- there's an excellent guide at:
    > | http://www.astro.washington.edu/owen/TkinterSummary.html
    > <snip>
    > | David
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the tip.
    >
    >
    Michael S. Jessop, Jul 14, 2003
    #5
  6. David McNab

    Peter Hansen Guest

    David McNab wrote:
    >
    > One more thing Elaine - I may offend others on this list in saying this,
    > but if you're doing GUI applications, I strongly suggest that you dive in
    > and familiarise yourself with Tkinter. It could well be the only GUI you
    > ever need in Python.
    >
    > Don't be intimidated if the Tkinter docs you come across urge you to
    > approach it from a Tk viewpoint- there's an excellent guide at:
    > http://www.astro.washington.edu/owen/TkinterSummary.html
    >
    > I argue for Tkinter over another popular Python-accessible GUI, wxWindows,
    > because Tkinter is smaller, faster and far less buggy, and has a really
    > nice 'feel' within the Python environment.


    And there are those of us who have tried that route already, found
    it lacking, and are much happier with wxPython (not wxWindows)
    because we find it faster, more cosmetically pleasing and usable,
    and easier to work with.

    To each his own. Thankfully we all have a choice here.

    -Peter
    Peter Hansen, Jul 14, 2003
    #6
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