Re: offsetof macro and non-POD structures. Solution.

Discussion in 'C++' started by Christopher Benson-Manica, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. Default User <> wrote:

    (crossposted to comp.lang.c++, f'ups set)

    > While the C-headers such as <stdio.h> are deprecated in C++, they are
    > standard. In fact, I suspect that they will persist through many more
    > revisions of the C++ standard.


    I gather that the rest of the headers held over from C (<string.h>,
    <stdlib.h>, etc.) are also standard?

    --
    C. Benson Manica | I *should* know what I'm talking about - if I
    cbmanica(at)gmail.com | don't, I need to know. Flames welcome.
    Christopher Benson-Manica, Oct 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. Christopher Benson-Manica

    Phlip Guest

    Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:

    > Default User wrote:
    >
    > (crossposted to comp.lang.c++, f'ups set)
    >
    >> While the C-headers such as <stdio.h> are deprecated in C++, they are
    >> standard. In fact, I suspect that they will persist through many more
    >> revisions of the C++ standard.

    >
    > I gather that the rest of the headers held over from C (<string.h>,
    > <stdlib.h>, etc.) are also standard?


    The apricated versions are <cstring> and <cstdlib>.

    The <*.h> headers occupy a legal deadspot of necessity. C++ was designed to
    adapt to legacy C code, so because we will always have a legacy corpus of C
    to compile, sometimes as C++, they will always need the *.h headers.

    --
    Phlip
    http://www.greencheese.us/ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!
    Phlip, Oct 18, 2006
    #2
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  3. Christopher Benson-Manica

    Default User Guest

    Christopher Benson-Manica wrote:

    > Default User <> wrote:
    >
    > (crossposted to comp.lang.c++, f'ups set)
    >
    > > While the C-headers such as <stdio.h> are deprecated in C++, they
    > > are standard. In fact, I suspect that they will persist through
    > > many more revisions of the C++ standard.

    >
    > I gather that the rest of the headers held over from C (<string.h>,
    > <stdlib.h>, etc.) are also standard?


    The C standard library, is included in C++. In keeping with the way
    standard C++ developed, new headers were created for the library. An
    example would <cstring> or <cstdlib>. The result is some namespace
    difference that doesn't mean anything here. However, the original ones
    are still available, although deprecated.



    Brian
    Default User, Oct 18, 2006
    #3
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