Re: O'Reilly Python Certification

Discussion in 'Python' started by Steve Holden, Dec 16, 2010.

  1. Steve Holden

    Steve Holden Guest

    Each lesson required you to complete a practical assignment. You submit
    these assignments for evaluation, and do not proceed to the next lesson
    until your assignment reaches a satisfactory standard. Thus, less
    experienced students will tend to have more interaction with their tutors.

    A class will typically have between twelve and sixteen lessons. There
    are also quizzes and a final practical project.

    regards
    Steve

    On 12/16/2010 12:12 PM, Matty Sarro wrote:
    > So how exactly does the class work? Is it like an elementary CS class
    > where you have a teacher, assignments, etc. Or is it more like a
    > guided tour through the O'Reilly Python book/cookbook?
    >
    > On Thu, Dec 16, 2010 at 10:40 AM, Ethan Furman <> wrote:
    >> Please don't top-post. :)
    >>
    >> Nitin Pawar wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Can someone provide any links or any starting points on how to apply and
    >>> what are the prerequisites

    >>
    >> http://www.oreillyschool.com/certificates/python-programming.php
    >>
    >> No prerequisites that I could see, and currently they are running a 25%
    >> discount promotional.
    >>
    >> ~Ethan~
    >> --
    >> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >>



    --
    Steve Holden +1 571 484 6266 +1 800 494 3119
    PyCon 2011 Atlanta March 9-17 http://us.pycon.org/
    See Python Video! http://python.mirocommunity.org/
    Holden Web LLC http://www.holdenweb.com/
     
    Steve Holden, Dec 16, 2010
    #1
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  2. Steve Holden

    J. Altman Guest

    On 2010-12-16, Steve Holden <> wrote:
    > Each lesson required you to complete a practical assignment. You submit
    > these assignments for evaluation, and do not proceed to the next lesson
    > until your assignment reaches a satisfactory standard. Thus, less
    > experienced students will tend to have more interaction with their tutors.
    >
    > A class will typically have between twelve and sixteen lessons. There
    > are also quizzes and a final practical project.
    >
    > regards
    > Steve


    I have a general question.

    Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
    language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
    Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
    publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
    runs some version of Windows by MS?

    Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
    OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
    certificate's courses.

    Not that I particularly want to bash MS, but I am running FreeBSD, and
    have Python 2.x and 3.x installed; I can call either IDE; and I am
    competent at the shell, I think sufficiently, to manage coding at the
    shell.

    Is it normal for people in CS courses at the University and/or
    certificate level to learn a given language under Windows?

    Or is it just me who thinks it odd that an OS like FreeBSD won't
    (apparently, I stress) work with the O'Reilly Sandbox?
     
    J. Altman, Dec 28, 2010
    #2
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  3. Steve Holden

    Stephen Bunn Guest

    At Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:07:29 +0000 (UTC),
    J. Altman wrote:
    >
    > I have a general question.
    >
    > Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
    > language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
    > Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
    > publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
    > runs some version of Windows by MS?
    >
    > Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
    > OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
    > certificate's courses.

    This is not true. You can take the course on any operating system that supports a RDP client. I am enrolled with in the python course and I use GNU/Linux. They even have instructions on their website on how to configure it. I would have preferred them to use a UNIX shell. I'm still waiting for somebody to come up with a course that teaches me a programming language, while teaching me a VCS and allows me to write code and submit to a repo with other students contributing. You want to bring people into F/OSS -- That is how you do it!

    The complaint that I do have with OST (at least the Python course) and the reason I have not completed (or even worked on the course in almost a year) it, is that its just plain boring. It's almost 2011! Give me some interactive flash, a video, something. Reading some pages of dry text just doesn't cut it for me. I can do that on my own. If I'm going to pay for a course I want a teacher that is going to teach me something. I can buy plenty of books and read them. The entire course is just plain dry text. I don't even remeber seeing an image diagram. On top of that the text is horribly ugly to look at.
     
    Stephen Bunn, Dec 29, 2010
    #3
  4. Steve Holden

    Stephen Bunn Guest

    At Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:07:29 +0000 (UTC),
    J. Altman wrote:
    >
    > I have a general question.
    >
    > Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
    > language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
    > Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
    > publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
    > runs some version of Windows by MS?
    >
    > Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
    > OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
    > certificate's courses.

    This is not true. You can take the course on any operating system that supports a RDP client. I am enrolled with in the python course and I use GNU/Linux. They even have instructions on their website on how to configure it. I would have preferred them to use a UNIX shell. I'm still waiting for somebody to come up with a course that teaches me a programming language, while teaching me a VCS and allows me to write code and submit to a repo with other students contributing. You want to bring people into F/OSS -- That is how you do it!

    The complaint that I do have with OST (at least the Python course) and the reason I have not completed (or even worked on the course in almost a year) it, is that its just plain boring. It's almost 2011! Give me some interactive flash, a video, something. Reading some pages of dry text just doesn't cut it for me. I can do that on my own. If I'm going to pay for a course I want a teacher that is going to teach me something. I can buy plenty of books and read them. The entire course is just plain dry text. I don't even remeber seeing an image diagram. On top of that the text is horribly ugly to look at.
     
    Stephen Bunn, Dec 29, 2010
    #4
  5. Steve Holden

    Stephen Bunn Guest

    At Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:07:29 +0000 (UTC),
    J. Altman wrote:
    >
    > I have a general question.
    >
    > Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
    > language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
    > Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
    > publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
    > runs some version of Windows by MS?
    >
    > Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
    > OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
    > certificate's courses.

    This is not true. You can take the course on any operating system that supports a RDP client. I am enrolled with in the python course and I use GNU/Linux. They even have instructions on their website on how to configure it. I would have preferred them to use a UNIX shell. I'm still waiting for somebody to come up with a course that teaches me a programming language, while teaching me a VCS and allows me to write code and submit to a repo with other students contributing. You want to bring people into F/OSS -- That is how you do it!

    The complaint that I do have with OST (at least the Python course) and the reason I have not completed (or even worked on the course in almost a year) it, is that its just plain boring. It's almost 2011! Give me some interactive flash, a video, something. Reading some pages of dry text just doesn't cut it for me. I can do that on my own. If I'm going to pay for a course I want a teacher that is going to teach me something. I can buy plenty of books and read them. The entire course is just plain dry text. I don't even remeber seeing an image diagram. On top of that the text is horribly ugly to look at.
     
    Stephen Bunn, Dec 29, 2010
    #5
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