Re: Please provide a better explanation of tuples and dictionaries

Discussion in 'Python' started by Chris Angelico, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 1:55 PM, Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
    <> wrote:
    > I am currently using "Learning Python" by Mark Lutz and David Ascher,
    > published by O'Reilly (ISBN 1-56592-464-9)--but I find the explanations
    > insufficient and the number of examples to be sparse. I do understand some
    > ANSI C programming in addition to Python (and the book often wanders off
    > into a comparison of C and Python in its numerous footnotes), but I need a
    > better real-world example of how tuples and dictionaries are being used in
    > actual Python code.


    Have you checked out the online documentation at
    http://docs.python.org/ ? That might have what you're looking for.

    By the way, you may want to consider learning and using Python 3.3
    instead of the older branch 2.7; new features are only being added to
    the 3.x branch now, with 2.7 getting bugfixes and such for a couple of
    years, but ultimately it's not going anywhere. Obviously if you're
    supporting existing code, you'll need to learn the language that it
    was written in, but if this is all new code, go with the recent
    version.

    ChrisA
     
    Chris Angelico, Jan 30, 2013
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 2:42 PM, Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
    <> wrote:
    > "Chris Angelico" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Have you checked out the online documentation at
    >> http://docs.python.org/ ? That might have what you're looking for.
    >>

    > I'll check the online documentation but I was really seeking a book
    > recommendation or other offline resource. I am not always online, and often
    > times when I code I prefer local machine documentation or a book. I do also
    > have the .chm format help file in the Windows version of Python.


    Ah. I think the tutorial's in the chm file, but I'm not certain. But
    for actual books, I can't point to any; I learned from online info
    only, never actually sought a book (in fact, the last time I used
    dead-tree reference books was for C and C++). Sorry!

    >> By the way, you may want to consider learning and using Python 3.3
    >> instead of the older branch 2.7...
    >>

    > Honestly, I don't know what code is being supported. I've just seen enough
    > test automation requirements calling for Python (in addition to C# and perl)
    > in some of the latest job listings that I figured I better get some working
    > knowledge of Python to avoid becoming obsolete should I ever need to find
    > another job.


    A fair point. In that case, it's probably worth learning both; they're
    very similar. Learn either one first, then master the differences.

    ChrisA
     
    Chris Angelico, Jan 30, 2013
    #2
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mitya Sirenef
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    114
    Mitya Sirenef
    Jan 30, 2013
  2. John Gordon
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    117
    John Gordon
    Jan 30, 2013
  3. rusi
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    122
  4. Rick Johnson
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    130
    Chris Angelico
    Feb 3, 2013
  5. Jon Reyes
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    271
    Mitya Sirenef
    Feb 19, 2013
Loading...

Share This Page