Re: Polish characters

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Ben Bacarisse, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Paul Magnussen <> writes:

    > Is there an HTML character entity reference for the Polish letter that
    > looks like a lower-case "l" crossed through, please?
    >
    > I can't seem to find it.


    There isn't one, in so far as "character entity reference" refers to the
    limited set of "named" characters. Instead, you can use a numeric
    character reference like ł or (if you can have your document
    served with an encoding that includes it) you can just enter the
    character into the page like any other.

    The real problem is often not how to enter the character into a document,
    but whether it will be shown by a browser. In this case the character
    is not particularly obscure, so I think you will be fine.

    --
    Ben.
     
    Ben Bacarisse, Jan 15, 2012
    #1
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  2. 2012-01-15 3:21, Ben Bacarisse wrote:
    > Paul Magnussen<> writes:
    >
    >> Is there an HTML character entity reference for the Polish letter that
    >> looks like a lower-case "l" crossed through, please?
    >>
    >> I can't seem to find it.

    >
    > There isn't one, in so far as "character entity reference" refers to the
    > limited set of "named" characters.


    Unfortunately, there is now, if it suffices for existence to be present
    in HTML5 drafts and implemented in a major browser. I mention this only
    to warn about them - they add no expressive power, they are confusingly
    something between half-mnemonic and completely cryptic, and they
    introduce browser dependency for no good reason. (And they call them
    “named character references†to declare their formal independence of
    SGML and XML.)

    I’m afraid the idea looks sufficiently high-tech and cool to lure
    authors into writing, say, “Wa&lstrok;&eogon;sa†and getting high at
    seeing a name appearing properly (Wałęsa) on their up-to-date Firefox,
    without realizing that most users will see literally “Wa&lstrok;&eogon;saâ€.

    > Instead, you can use a numeric
    > character reference like ł or (if you can have your document
    > served with an encoding that includes it) you can just enter the
    > character into the page like any other.


    Right. And either way, http://www.alanwood.net/unicode/#links is of
    great help in identifying the Unicode number of the character. The
    number is useful both for determining the character reference to be used
    and for entering the character itself e.g. via Character Map in Windows
    or via some key combination.

    In this case, the character is in the Latin Extended-A block, which
    covers most of Latin letters used in European languages beyond the very
    basic A to Z (which are in Basic Latin) and the extensions needed for
    Northern and Western European languages (Latin-1 Supplement). That is,
    Latin Extended-A was designed to cover the additional letters used in
    Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Maltese etc. etc.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Jan 15, 2012
    #2
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