Re: RELEASED Python 2.5 (alpha 1)

Discussion in 'Python' started by Michael Ekstrand, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. After reading AMK's survey of what's new in Python 2.5, I am suitably
    impressed. As usual, I can't wait to start using the cool new
    features... extended generators? (mind is currently swimming with the
    question of "can I implement Scheme's call-with-current-continuation
    using extended generators".)

    Anyway, the more important question that came to mind: I see that 2.5
    will include the excellent ElementTree. Will cElementTree be included
    where available? or is it only the pure-Python version that will be in
    the standard library?

    - Michael

    --
    mouse, n: a device for pointing at the xterm in which you want to type.
    -- Fortune
    Visit me on the Web: http://www.elehack.net
     
    Michael Ekstrand, Apr 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. Michael Ekstrand wrote:
    > After reading AMK's survey of what's new in Python 2.5, I am suitably
    > impressed. As usual, I can't wait to start using the cool new
    > features... extended generators? (mind is currently swimming with the
    > question of "can I implement Scheme's call-with-current-continuation
    > using extended generators".)


    No.
     
    Michele Simionato, Apr 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. Michele Simionato wrote:
    > Michael Ekstrand wrote:
    >> After reading AMK's survey of what's new in Python 2.5, I am suitably
    >> impressed. As usual, I can't wait to start using the cool new
    >> features... extended generators? (mind is currently swimming with the
    >> question of "can I implement Scheme's call-with-current-continuation
    >> using extended generators".)

    >
    > No.


    Oh well. I'll try not to think too hard about it then.

    The day Python (without using Stackless) has true continuations will be
    a happy day.

    - Michael

    --
    mouse, n: a device for pointing at the xterm in which you want to type.
    -- Fortune
    Visit me on the Web: http://www.elehack.net
     
    Michael Ekstrand, Apr 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Michael Ekstrand wrote:
    > Michele Simionato wrote:
    > > Michael Ekstrand wrote:
    > >> After reading AMK's survey of what's new in Python 2.5, I am suitably
    > >> impressed. As usual, I can't wait to start using the cool new
    > >> features... extended generators? (mind is currently swimming with the
    > >> question of "can I implement Scheme's call-with-current-continuation
    > >> using extended generators".)

    > >
    > > No.

    >
    > Oh well. I'll try not to think too hard about it then.
    >
    > The day Python (without using Stackless) has true continuations will be
    > a happy day.


    It is interesting that the support for full continuations was removed
    in recent
    versions of Stackless (I think there was support in version 1, not in
    versions
    2 and 3, but I am not a Stackless user so please correct me if I am
    wrong).

    Coroutines give you more control on your program flow, but not as much
    as
    full continuations. With full continuations you can store the current
    state
    of your program (with some restrictions, the program should not have
    side effects or interact with an external environment) and at a later
    time
    go back to to that state. In a sense you can go back in time (but only
    in
    points that your program has already travelled) whereas with coroutine
    you can go just in one direction in the time. A nice thing you can do
    with full continuations is a modal Web server
    (seehttp://www.double.co.nz/scheme/modal-web-server.html).
    But this is definitely OT for this thread, so let me stop here ;)


    Michele Simionato
     
    Michele Simionato, Apr 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Michael Ekstrand

    Terry Reedy Guest

    "Michele Simionato" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Michael Ekstrand wrote:
    >> The day Python (without using Stackless) has true continuations will be
    >> a happy day.


    Don't hold your breath. Guido regards 'true continuations' as complexity
    overload for the typical programmer and has declared (on one his Artima
    blog posts, for instance, recently) that he will never add them to core
    Python.

    tjr
     
    Terry Reedy, Apr 6, 2006
    #5
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