Re: Rendering very large images with JAI

Discussion in 'Java' started by meta.person@gmail.com, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. Guest

    On 2 ÆÅ×, 22:08, "John B. Matthews" <> wrote:

    > At least one company uses JAI in this context:
    >
    > <http://java.sun.com/products/java-media/jai/success/lmco.html>
    >
    > I'm sure there are others. GIYF
    >
    > --
    > John B. Matthews
    > trashgod at gmail dot com
    > <http://sites.google.com/site/drjohnbmatthews>


    Yes, has done some investigations in this field and found very nice
    geoserver (http://geoserver.org), but it requires prerendered maps
    already on disk. Moreover, in my case (I use Openlayers [TMS layer
    with custom getURL function] as web client) map server could be
    replaced with any web server (actually the same web container) and
    proper directory structure for the tiles. The problem is in efficient
    tiling and handling very large images.
    I didn't found any efficient way to create large image with predefined
    tile size in memory and have sense that JAI was created for processing
    already stored images. But I'm new to JAI and will be glad to any
    useful information.
    , Feb 2, 2009
    #1
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  2. In article
    <>,
    wrote:

    > On 2 ÙÂ’, 22:08, "John B. Matthews" <> wrote:
    >
    > > At least one company uses JAI in this context:
    > >
    > > <http://java.sun.com/products/java-media/jai/success/lmco.html>
    > >
    > > I'm sure there are others. GIYF

    [...]
    > Yes, has done some investigations in this field and found very nice
    > geoserver (http://geoserver.org), but it requires prerendered maps
    > already on disk.


    I have never seen a system that did not require this.

    > Moreover, in my case (I use Openlayers [TMS layer with custom getURL
    > function] as web client) map server could be replaced with any web
    > server (actually the same web container) and proper directory
    > structure for the tiles.


    A typical modern hierarchical directory structure lends itself well to
    this, although Oracle Spatial is an alternative.

    > The problem is in efficient tiling and handling very large images.


    I see no choice but to pre-render several resolutions using off-line
    processing.

    > I didn't found any efficient way to create large image with
    > predefined tile size in memory


    It seems easier to render suitably sized tiles of source imagery at the
    highest supported resolution and scaling to lower resolutions as
    required. Typically, any destination tile may be constructed from, at
    most, four such source tiles. In the alternative, I have found large,
    random access files impractical.

    > and have sense that JAI was created for processing already stored
    > images. But I'm new to JAI and will be glad to any useful
    > information.


    I'd be interested to hear if this is practical.

    [Please trim signatures when replying.]
    --
    John B. Matthews
    trashgod at gmail dot com
    <http://sites.google.com/site/drjohnbmatthews>
    John B. Matthews, Feb 2, 2009
    #2
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