Re: Supported Platforms for Python

Discussion in 'Python' started by Kiran N Mallekoppa, Nov 14, 2012.

  1. Hi there!

    Our team at IBM are exploring the possibility of implementing one of our
    products using Python. I had a query in this regard.

    As per IBM's policy, we list details of platforms that our product works on
    - including the flavors of OS, the versions supported (and sometimes, even
    the service packs, if it matters) so that it is un-ambiguous to our
    customers. As an example, you can have a look at this page.

    Suppose we are riding on Python (i.e., implementing using Python), we need
    to tell our customers in similar detail as to what platforms we support our
    products on. I tried to find information about the platforms on which
    Python is supported from your page. But, it does not detail the versions of
    OS supported.

    In this regard, I have the following questions. Thanks for taking your time
    to respond.
    1. Is this information available somewhere?
    2. I was pointed to PEP-11, which documents the platforms that are not
    supported. So, can we take that all active versions of Python (2.7.3 and
    3.3, i believe) are supported on all the OS flavors that Python claims to
    run on -- unless mentioned otherwise in the PEP-11?
    3. Also, regarding the following entries listed in the PEP-11. So, any idea
    which OSes implement these?
    Name: Linux 1 (Am guessing its the Linux kernel version
    1.0?)
    Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    Code removed in: Python 2.4
    Name: Systems defining __d6_pthread_create (configure.in)
    Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    Code removed in: Python 2.4
    Name: Systems defining PY_PTHREAD_D4, PY_PTHREAD_D6, or PY_PTHREAD_D7
    in thread_pthread.h
    Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    Code removed in: Python 2.4
    Name: Systems using --with-dl-dld
    Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    Code removed in: Python 2.4
    Name: Systems using --without-universal-newlines,
    Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    Code removed in: Python 2.4
    Name: Systems using --with-wctype-functions
    Unsupported in: Python 2.6
    Code removed in: Python 2.6
    Name: Systems using Mach C Threads
    Unsupported in: Python 3.2
    Code removed in: Python 3.3
    Name: Systems using --with-pth (GNU pth threads)
    Unsupported in: Python 3.2
    Code removed in: Python 3.3
    Name: Systems using Irix threads
    Unsupported in: Python 3.2
    Code removed in: Python 3.3


    Warm Regards,
    Kiran M N | Software Development (Rational Team Concert for Visual
    Studio.NET) | IBM Rational | India Software Labs | Email:




    From: Michael Foord <>
    To:
    Cc: Kiran N Mallekoppa/India/IBM@IBMIN
    Date: 08-11-12 08:10 PM
    Subject: Re: Supported Platforms for Python




    On 8 Nov 2012, at 14:36, wrote:

    > On Thu, Nov 08, 2012, Kiran N Mallekoppa wrote:
    >>
    >> Suppose we are riding on Python (i.e., implementing using Python), we

    need
    >> to tell our customers in similar detail as to what platforms we support

    our
    >> products on. I tried to find information about the platforms on which
    >> Python is supported from your page. But, it does not detail the versions

    of
    >> OS supported.
    >>
    >> Is this information available somewhere? If not, can this be published

    on
    >> your site?

    >
    > Not really. ;-) You'll find some on
    > http://www.python.org/download/other/
    >
    > However, Python is (mostly) plain C and Open Source, which essentially
    > means that support is available for any platform where people are willing
    > to invest resources. AIX in particular has always been one of the
    > problem platforms.
    >
    > What this means for you is that if IBM wants to allocate resources to get
    > Python running on any particular platform, it almost certainly can be
    > done, and we certainly would appreciate getting any such work contributed
    > back to the community.
    >
    > If you want more information, you're probably best off using one of the
    > discussion forums listed in your auto-reply.



    As an addendum note that there is a list of explicitly unsupported
    platforms (platforms that used to be supported and in which versions of
    Python support was removed):

    http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0011/

    You can see which platforms we test Python, and the test systems are
    considered stable, from our buildbots. The Python 2.7 ones are here:

    http://buildbot.python.org/all/waterfall?category=2.7.stable

    Another tangible way to support a platform is to provide and maintain a
    buildbot for running the Python tests on.

    All the best,

    Michael Foord

    > --
    > Aahz () <*>

    http://www.pythoncraft.com/
    >
    > "....Normal is what cuts off your sixth finger and your tail..."

    --Siobhan
    >



    --
    http://www.voidspace.org.uk/


    May you do good and not evil
    May you find forgiveness for yourself and forgive others
    May you share freely, never taking more than you give.
    -- the sqlite blessing
    http://www.sqlite.org/different.html
    Kiran N Mallekoppa, Nov 14, 2012
    #1
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  2. Am 14.11.2012 10:51, schrieb Kiran N Mallekoppa:
    > 1. Is this information available somewhere?
    > 2. I was pointed to PEP-11, which documents the platforms that are not
    > supported. So, can we take that all active versions of Python (2.7.3 and
    > 3.3, i believe) are supported on all the OS flavors that Python claims to
    > run on -- unless mentioned otherwise in the PEP-11?


    There is intent to support these platforms, but as with every software
    that relies on volunteers, the actual extent varies. If you want to be
    sure that a platform is actively supported, check that the platform has
    an available and active build bot, because only this detects bitrot to a
    certain extent. If you want to be sure, create build and test systems
    for the systems you target yourself, you will then see if it works.


    > 3. Also, regarding the following entries listed in the PEP-11. So, any idea
    > which OSes implement these?
    > Name: Linux 1 (Am guessing its the Linux kernel version
    > 1.0?)
    > Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    > Code removed in: Python 2.4


    Yes, Linux 1 is obsolete and has been for > 10 years.


    > Name: Systems defining __d6_pthread_create (configure.in)
    > Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    > Code removed in: Python 2.4
    > Name: Systems defining PY_PTHREAD_D4, PY_PTHREAD_D6, or PY_PTHREAD_D7
    > in thread_pthread.h
    > Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    > Code removed in: Python 2.4
    > Name: Systems using --with-dl-dld
    > Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    > Code removed in: Python 2.4
    > Name: Systems using --without-universal-newlines,
    > Unsupported in: Python 2.3
    > Code removed in: Python 2.4
    > Name: Systems using --with-wctype-functions
    > Unsupported in: Python 2.6
    > Code removed in: Python 2.6


    I'm not sure where these are used.


    > Name: Systems using Mach C Threads
    > Unsupported in: Python 3.2
    > Code removed in: Python 3.3


    Mach is a microkernel. I'm not sure if the Mach C Threads interface is
    obsolete on Mach or if Mach overall isn't supported. Probably irrelevant
    for the desktop.


    > Name: Systems using --with-pth (GNU pth threads)
    > Unsupported in: Python 3.2
    > Code removed in: Python 3.3


    I think this is targetted at early Linux threads that used fork() while
    sharing most of the memory space. Obsolete.


    > Name: Systems using Irix threads
    > Unsupported in: Python 3.2
    > Code removed in: Python 3.3


    Irix was a Unix variant shipped with SGI workstations. I don't kknow to
    what extent this is relevant for you. I think that the main use cases
    for these machines is 3D rendering/modelling, unless they have been
    superseeded by common desktop machines.


    > Kiran M N | Software Development (Rational Team Concert for Visual Studio.NET)


    Just out of curiosity by one of your RTC users: What nice gimmics are
    you planning?


    Cheers!


    Uli
    Ulrich Eckhardt, Nov 14, 2012
    #2
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