Re-taking VHDL class and need help.

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by mugz, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. mugz

    mugz Guest

    I am re-taking my VHDL class because I ended up with a "D". Mostly my
    fault but also Professor was not very good at explaining. She pretty
    much gave us a sheet of paper and told us the first project was due
    within 2 weeks. The projects I do not think were that hard if you knew
    what you are doing except the final project works up to building a
    CPU.

    Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book I could
    get? I googled my computer to death last semester. I got some info but
    nothing that really explained, just examples and I did not know why
    they did stuff.

    Any help would be great, not to mention it is my last semester so I
    got to get this class up to at least a "C" or I might spending an
    extra semester here at school.
     
    mugz, Aug 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. (mugz) wrote in message news:<>...
    > I am re-taking my VHDL class because I ended up with a "D". Mostly my
    > fault but also Professor was not very good at explaining. She pretty
    > much gave us a sheet of paper and told us the first project was due
    > within 2 weeks. The projects I do not think were that hard if you knew
    > what you are doing except the final project works up to building a
    > CPU.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book I could
    > get? I googled my computer to death last semester. I got some info but
    > nothing that really explained, just examples and I did not know why
    > they did stuff.
    >
    > Any help would be great, not to mention it is my last semester so I
    > got to get this class up to at least a "C" or I might spending an
    > extra semester here at school.


    You are sure to get diverse opinions on this, but my favorite VHDL
    book is "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" by Peter Ashenden. He does
    have some chapters on the design of a CPU. I have both the first and
    second editions of this book as well as a number of other VHDL books,
    and I think "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" is excellent. I wish you
    the best of luck in your second try at the VHDL course.

    Best Regards,

    Charles
     
    Charles M. Elias, Aug 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. mugz

    Jim Lewis Guest

    For a beginner book that you can read cover to cover,
    I like:
    J. Bhasker's VHDL Primer

    Cheers,
    Jim

    > I am re-taking my VHDL class because I ended up with a "D". Mostly my
    > fault but also Professor was not very good at explaining. She pretty
    > much gave us a sheet of paper and told us the first project was due
    > within 2 weeks. The projects I do not think were that hard if you knew
    > what you are doing except the final project works up to building a
    > CPU.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book I could
    > get? I googled my computer to death last semester. I got some info but
    > nothing that really explained, just examples and I did not know why
    > they did stuff.
    >
    > Any help would be great, not to mention it is my last semester so I
    > got to get this class up to at least a "C" or I might spending an
    > extra semester here at school.



    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Jim Lewis
    Director of Training mailto:
    SynthWorks Design Inc. http://www.SynthWorks.com
    1-503-590-4787

    Expert VHDL Training for Hardware Design and Verification
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Jim Lewis, Aug 2, 2004
    #3
  4. mugz

    Duane Clark Guest

    Charles M. Elias wrote:
    >
    > You are sure to get diverse opinions on this, but my favorite VHDL
    > book is "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" by Peter Ashenden. He does
    > have some chapters on the design of a CPU. I have both the first and
    > second editions of this book as well as a number of other VHDL books,
    > and I think "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" is excellent. I wish you
    > the best of luck in your second try at the VHDL course.
    >


    Yep, I completely agree. Not only was it very readable and useful to me
    when starting out, but even after several years of using VHDL, I still
    refer to it.

    --
    My real email is akamail.com@dclark (or something like that).
     
    Duane Clark, Aug 2, 2004
    #4
  5. mugz

    mugz Guest

    Thanks guys for all the info. I will look into all of them.
     
    mugz, Aug 3, 2004
    #5
  6. mugz

    fabbl Guest

    Third vote - very comprehensive, complete and covers the whole language.

    "Duane Clark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Charles M. Elias wrote:
    > >
    > > You are sure to get diverse opinions on this, but my favorite VHDL
    > > book is "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" by Peter Ashenden. He does
    > > have some chapters on the design of a CPU. I have both the first and
    > > second editions of this book as well as a number of other VHDL books,
    > > and I think "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" is excellent. I wish you
    > > the best of luck in your second try at the VHDL course.
    > >

    >
    > Yep, I completely agree. Not only was it very readable and useful to me
    > when starting out, but even after several years of using VHDL, I still
    > refer to it.
    >
    > --
    > My real email is akamail.com@dclark (or something like that).
     
    fabbl, Aug 3, 2004
    #6
  7. mugz

    Jim Lewis Guest

    Peter's book is great. It has 30 pages on everything.
    I consider it a selected topics book. For beginners,
    there is too much information. So I recommend that a
    beginner read Bhasker's book or take a good training
    class first.

    For intermediate/advanced VHDL coders, Peter's book is
    my number one recommended book.

    Cheers,
    Jim
    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Jim Lewis
    Director of Training mailto:
    SynthWorks Design Inc. http://www.SynthWorks.com
    1-503-590-4787

    Expert VHDL Training for Hardware Design and Verification
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    > Third vote - very comprehensive, complete and covers the whole language.
    >
    > "Duane Clark" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Charles M. Elias wrote:
    >>
    >>>You are sure to get diverse opinions on this, but my favorite VHDL
    >>>book is "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" by Peter Ashenden. He does
    >>>have some chapters on the design of a CPU. I have both the first and
    >>>second editions of this book as well as a number of other VHDL books,
    >>>and I think "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" is excellent. I wish you
    >>>the best of luck in your second try at the VHDL course.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Yep, I completely agree. Not only was it very readable and useful to me
    >>when starting out, but even after several years of using VHDL, I still
    >>refer to it.
    >>
    >>--
    >>My real email is akamail.com@dclark (or something like that).

    >
    >
    >
     
    Jim Lewis, Aug 3, 2004
    #7
  8. mugz

    e7 Guest

    mugz wrote:

    > I am re-taking my VHDL class because I ended up with a "D". Mostly my
    > fault but also Professor was not very good at explaining. She pretty
    > much gave us a sheet of paper and told us the first project was due
    > within 2 weeks. The projects I do not think were that hard if you knew
    > what you are doing except the final project works up to building a
    > CPU.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book I could
    > get? I googled my computer to death last semester. I got some info but
    > nothing that really explained, just examples and I did not know why
    > they did stuff.
    >
    > Any help would be great, not to mention it is my last semester so I
    > got to get this class up to at least a "C" or I might spending an
    > extra semester here at school.


    Hi,

    I'm new and trying to learn also. What systems do they teach you to use
    to program up a chip? Does the software run on PC - may be Linux?
    Which chips are easy to learn and use?
     
    e7, Aug 3, 2004
    #8
  9. mugz

    Joe Guest

    mugz wrote:

    > I am re-taking my VHDL class because I ended up with a "D". Mostly my
    > fault but also Professor was not very good at explaining. She pretty
    > much gave us a sheet of paper and told us the first project was due
    > within 2 weeks. The projects I do not think were that hard if you knew
    > what you are doing except the final project works up to building a
    > CPU.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book I could
    > get? I googled my computer to death last semester. I got some info but
    > nothing that really explained, just examples and I did not know why
    > they did stuff.
    >
    > Any help would be great, not to mention it is my last semester so I
    > got to get this class up to at least a "C" or I might spending an
    > extra semester here at school.


    On VHDL FAQ part 2:
    http://www.vhdl.org/comp.lang.vhdl/FAQ2.html
    At the bottom of the page, you can found some free stuffs
    e.g. the VHDL manual is short but it is easy to carry around.

    In addition, there is Actel Coding guide
    http://www.actel.com/documents/hdlcode.pdf
    It covers basic design coding for both VHDL and Verilog.

    For practice, goto www.xilinx.com and download the Modelsim for
    XIlinx edition. It is free and is good enough for testing your
    VHDL designs. (Unfortunately it is windows only).

    Joe
     
    Joe, Aug 3, 2004
    #9
  10. mugz

    srivaths Guest

    i guess u can try out VHDL book by "douglas perry" i guess i got the
    spelling right....thats a neat book which covers everything u need...


    "Jim Lewis" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Peter's book is great. It has 30 pages on everything.
    > I consider it a selected topics book. For beginners,
    > there is too much information. So I recommend that a
    > beginner read Bhasker's book or take a good training
    > class first.
    >
    > For intermediate/advanced VHDL coders, Peter's book is
    > my number one recommended book.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Jim
    > --
    > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    > Jim Lewis
    > Director of Training mailto:
    > SynthWorks Design Inc. http://www.SynthWorks.com
    > 1-503-590-4787
    >
    > Expert VHDL Training for Hardware Design and Verification
    > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    >
    >
    > > Third vote - very comprehensive, complete and covers the whole language.
    > >
    > > "Duane Clark" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >
    > >>Charles M. Elias wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>You are sure to get diverse opinions on this, but my favorite VHDL
    > >>>book is "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" by Peter Ashenden. He does
    > >>>have some chapters on the design of a CPU. I have both the first and
    > >>>second editions of this book as well as a number of other VHDL books,
    > >>>and I think "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" is excellent. I wish you
    > >>>the best of luck in your second try at the VHDL course.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Yep, I completely agree. Not only was it very readable and useful to me
    > >>when starting out, but even after several years of using VHDL, I still
    > >>refer to it.
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>My real email is akamail.com@dclark (or something like that).

    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    srivaths, Aug 5, 2004
    #10
  11. On 2 Aug 2004 04:46:32 -0700, (Charles M.
    Elias) wrote:

    > (mugz) wrote in message news:<>...
    >> I am re-taking my VHDL class because I ended up with a "D".
    >> Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book


    >You are sure to get diverse opinions on this, but my favorite VHDL
    >book is "The Designer's Guide to VHDL" by Peter Ashenden.


    Another vote for Ashenden here. But I suggest also googling for
    Ashenden's "VHDL Cookbook". It is (was?) a free download covering the
    basics (including a very simple CPU) clearly and concisely.

    - Brian
     
    Brian Drummond, Aug 6, 2004
    #11
  12. We strongly recommend Ben Cohen's book, "VHDL Coding Styles &
    Methodologies", as it's a great reference and Ben is considered one of
    the top VHDL Gurus. However, we're a bit biased because we sell it.
    $69 on Amazon.

    HDL Book Sellers

    > Does anyone know of a good EASY to read and UNDERSTAND book I could
    > get? I googled my computer to death last semester. I got some info but
    > nothing that really explained, just examples and I did not know why
    > they did stuff.
     
    HDL Book Seller, Aug 6, 2004
    #12
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