Re: /usr/bin/CC

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Keith Thompson, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. China Blue Meanies <> writes:
    > Is /usr/bin/CC documented somewhere?


    I've seen "CC" used as the name of a C++ compiler (assuming that "CC"
    and "cc" are distinct file names on your system).

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    Nokia
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Apr 1, 2011
    #1
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  2. Keith Thompson

    Tim Prince Guest

    On 4/1/2011 8:42 AM, Keith Thompson wrote:
    > China Blue Meanies<> writes:
    >> Is /usr/bin/CC documented somewhere?

    >
    > I've seen "CC" used as the name of a C++ compiler (assuming that "CC"
    > and "cc" are distinct file names on your system).
    >

    We were supposed to know it was a system without the uppercase/lowercase
    distinction between C and C++ compilers.

    --
    Tim Prince
     
    Tim Prince, Apr 1, 2011
    #2
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  3. Tim Prince <> writes:
    > On 4/1/2011 8:42 AM, Keith Thompson wrote:
    >> China Blue Meanies<> writes:
    >>> Is /usr/bin/CC documented somewhere?

    >>
    >> I've seen "CC" used as the name of a C++ compiler (assuming that "CC"
    >> and "cc" are distinct file names on your system).
    >>

    > We were supposed to know it was a system without the uppercase/lowercase
    > distinction between C and C++ compilers.


    How? (Please note the cross-post.)

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    Nokia
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Apr 1, 2011
    #3
  4. Keith Thompson

    Tom Stiller Guest

    In article <>,
    Tim Prince <> wrote:

    > On 4/1/2011 8:42 AM, Keith Thompson wrote:
    > > China Blue Meanies<> writes:
    > >> Is /usr/bin/CC documented somewhere?

    > >
    > > I've seen "CC" used as the name of a C++ compiler (assuming that "CC"
    > > and "cc" are distinct file names on your system).
    > >

    > We were supposed to know it was a system without the uppercase/lowercase
    > distinction between C and C++ compilers.


    Within a makefile CC is usually a make variable which is assigned the
    path name to the compiler to be used.

    --
    Tom Stiller

    PGP fingerprint = 5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3 7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
     
    Tom Stiller, Apr 1, 2011
    #4
  5. On 11-04-01 5:14 PM, Tom Stiller wrote:

    > Within a makefile CC is usually a make variable which is assigned the
    > path name to the compiler to be used.


    Exactly. Usually used as $(CC)

    So maybe this is the source of confusion.

    Cheers,

    -j


    --
    Jeffrey Goldberg http://goldmark.org/jeff/
    I rarely read HTML or poorly quoting posts
    Reply-To address is valid
     
    Jeffrey Goldberg, Apr 1, 2011
    #5
  6. Keith Thompson

    Paul Sture Guest

    On Fri, 01 Apr 2011 18:14:31 -0400
    Tom Stiller <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Tim Prince <> wrote:
    >
    > > On 4/1/2011 8:42 AM, Keith Thompson wrote:
    > > > China Blue Meanies<> writes:
    > > >> Is /usr/bin/CC documented somewhere?
    > > >
    > > > I've seen "CC" used as the name of a C++ compiler (assuming that
    > > > "CC" and "cc" are distinct file names on your system).
    > > >

    > > We were supposed to know it was a system without the
    > > uppercase/lowercase distinction between C and C++ compilers.

    >
    > Within a makefile CC is usually a make variable which is assigned the
    > path name to the compiler to be used.
    >


    I have seen that technique used in script files to ensure that the
    correct versions of utilities are used by the scripts..
     
    Paul Sture, Apr 3, 2011
    #6
  7. In article <20110404001246.1a912739@Mint10>,
    Paul Sture <> wrote:

    > I have seen that technique used in script files to ensure that the
    > correct versions of utilities are used by the scripts..


    The Makefile will work with any number of compilers, so it sets up a
    variable that points to the one you're using.
    --
    one more silver dollar
    weed whites and wine
    there's no smokin' anywhere
    You made me this way asshole
     
    Edward Theodore Gein, Apr 4, 2011
    #7
  8. Keith Thompson

    Seebs Guest

    On 2011-04-01, Tim Prince <> wrote:
    > On 4/1/2011 8:42 AM, Keith Thompson wrote:
    >> China Blue Meanies<> writes:
    >>> Is /usr/bin/CC documented somewhere?


    >> I've seen "CC" used as the name of a C++ compiler (assuming that "CC"
    >> and "cc" are distinct file names on your system).


    > We were supposed to know it was a system without the uppercase/lowercase
    > distinction between C and C++ compilers.


    Hey, it's crossposted to comp.sys.mac.system, surely everyone knows that
    the default filesystem on OS X is case-preserving*. And... while that's
    basically non-topical here, I would consider basic awareness of the madnesses
    to which filesystems are subject to be something that any programmer would
    want to keep in mind, because you never know when you're going to be asked
    to fix something which is incomprehensible if you don't know about the
    FILENA~1 naming convention.

    -s
    [*] ignores case for purposes of matching, so "cat FOO" will find a file
    named "foo", but displays file names with the capitalization you used when
    creating them. Classic Mac always did this, so far as I know, as did the
    Amiga; modern Mac does it by default and a lot of stuff won't work if you
    try to change it.
    --
    Copyright 2011, all wrongs reversed. Peter Seebach /
    http://www.seebs.net/log/ <-- lawsuits, religion, and funny pictures
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Game_(Scientology) <-- get educated!
    I am not speaking for my employer, although they do rent some of my opinions.
     
    Seebs, Apr 5, 2011
    #8
  9. Keith Thompson

    Wes Groleau Guest

    On 04-05-2011 13:12, Seebs wrote:
    > creating them. Classic Mac always did this, so far as I know, as did the
    > Amiga; modern Mac does it by default and a lot of stuff won't work if you
    > try to change it.


    :) And other stuff won't work if you don't change it. :)

    --
    Wes Groleau

    Ostracism: A practice of sticking your head in the sand.
     
    Wes Groleau, Apr 6, 2011
    #9
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