Re: Which book is better, Core Java or Thinking in Java?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Bryce, May 2, 2005.

  1. Bryce

    Bryce Guest

    On Sun, 01 May 2005 04:07:48 GMT, SteveSmith@nomail. wrote:

    >Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?
    >
    >Is one of these two books better for learning Swing? Overall which is better for all the
    >important topics?
    >
    >I've been using the downloaded version of Thinking in Java as a reference while reading
    >another book. I've just started reading Chaper 14 "Creating Windows and Applets". I'm not
    >that happy with it. Maybe I haven't gotten far enough into it yet but so far I don't think
    >he tells you enough about what the methods do or even the purpose of the different classes
    >like JFrame, JApplet and JPanel at least not at first. Maybe it gets better later in the
    >chapter so I can't say for sure it's not that good at this point.


    I have found that the Thinking in Java book is a very good book, if
    you already know how to program in another language, such as C/C++.

    For beginners, I'd try Sun's Java Tutorial, which is also online.

    Core Java was good back when I was first learning Java , but again, I
    think it was best if you already knew a programming language.

    --
    now with more cowbell
     
    Bryce, May 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 02 May 2005 10:39:14 -0400, Bryce <> wrote:

    >On Sun, 01 May 2005 04:07:48 GMT, SteveSmith@nomail. wrote:
    >
    >>Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?
    >>
    >>Is one of these two books better for learning Swing? Overall which is better for all the
    >>important topics?
    >>
    >>I've been using the downloaded version of Thinking in Java as a reference while reading
    >>another book. I've just started reading Chaper 14 "Creating Windows and Applets". I'm not
    >>that happy with it. Maybe I haven't gotten far enough into it yet but so far I don't think
    >>he tells you enough about what the methods do or even the purpose of the different classes
    >>like JFrame, JApplet and JPanel at least not at first. Maybe it gets better later in the
    >>chapter so I can't say for sure it's not that good at this point.

    >
    >I have found that the Thinking in Java book is a very good book, if
    >you already know how to program in another language, such as C/C++.
    >
    >For beginners, I'd try Sun's Java Tutorial, which is also online.
    >
    >Core Java was good back when I was first learning Java , but again, I
    >think it was best if you already knew a programming language.


    Thanks.
     
    SteveSmith@nomail., May 5, 2005
    #2
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