Re: Why you should validate your HTML and CSS

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Jukka K. Korpela, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. 2012-01-27 12:18, Delois wrote:

    > With point of visitors, your website might be different blocks which are
    > designed well and have interest of its functionality only with point of
    > search engine


    This looks like a translation. I think many people would prefer reading
    the original.
    > Your visitors don�t care


    Your message contains an octet outside the ASCII range, yet your message
    headers have no character code specification. This is Usenet, not HTML,
    but a very similar problem occurs in web authoring. If you cannot handle
    this basic issue in a simple context like e-mail, are you competent in
    giving advice on more sophisticated authoring issues?

    > search engine
    > require error free pages to index your website.


    A search engine that required pages to be error-free would soon be a
    dead search engine, even if we limit ourselves to very technical aspects
    of being error-free. The vast majority of web pages have HTML syntax
    errors, CSS syntax errors, or JavaScript code errors, not to mention
    incorrect semantics of tags, dysfunct links, violation of WAI rules, etc.

    > Validating all code on web page make sure that all the function works
    > properly on your website.


    It does no such thing, even under the most liberal interpretation of
    "validation".

    > Sometime giving wrong input to specific
    > function stop works and it can be found by validation.


    HTML has no functions.
    > In some extreme conditions, due to server errors visitors can�t view the
    > content or access the website. You can check possible server errors can
    > cause in different condition.


    This has nothing to do with HTML validation.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Jan 27, 2012
    #1
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  2. Jukka K. Korpela

    TK Guest

    On 1/27/2012 4:57 AM, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    > 2012-01-27 12:18, Delois wrote:
    >
    >> With point of visitors, your website might be different blocks which are
    >> designed well and have interest of its functionality only with point of
    >> search engine

    >
    > This looks like a translation. I think many people would prefer reading
    > the original.
    >> Your visitors don�t care

    >
    > Your message contains an octet outside the ASCII range, yet your message
    > headers have no character code specification. This is Usenet, not HTML,
    > but a very similar problem occurs in web authoring. If you cannot handle
    > this basic issue in a simple context like e-mail, are you competent in
    > giving advice on more sophisticated authoring issues?


    As a point of interest, in the op's message the ' (apostrophe) displays
    correctly. In your quote it displays as a diamond with a ? in the center.

    --
    TK ~ aka Terry Kimpling
    http://wejuggle2.com/
    1729, smallest prime number - sum of two cubes, two different ways
     
    TK, Jan 27, 2012
    #2
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  3. 2012-01-27 15:39, TK wrote:
    >>> Your visitors don�t care

    >>
    >> Your message contains an octet outside the ASCII range, yet your message
    >> headers have no character code specification. This is Usenet, not HTML,
    >> but a very similar problem occurs in web authoring. If you cannot handle
    >> this basic issue in a simple context like e-mail, are you competent in
    >> giving advice on more sophisticated authoring issues?

    >
    > As a point of interest, in the op's message the ' (apostrophe) displays
    > correctly.


    As I explained in the text quoted above, the original message has a data
    error: a byte that is undefined in the implied encoding (ASCII).

    > In your quote it displays as a diamond with a ? in the center.

    The character � (U+FFFD REPLACEMENT CHARACTER) is an adequate symbol for
    indicating data error. As the Unicode Standard says, it is “used to
    replace an incoming character whose value is unknown or unrepresentable
    in Unicode.†Of course I know that the OP _meant_ to use U+2019 RIGHT
    SINGLE QUOTATION MARK (’) there, but that’s not what the data contains.
    Similarly, good browsers display � to indicate character data error (a
    byte or byte sequence that does represent a character in the declared or
    implied encoding) in HTML. They may do some heuristic error recovery,
    though, so some common errors like using windows-1252 encoded U+2019 in
    data purported to be ISO-8859-1 are usually silently fixed by applying
    automatic switch to windows-1252. But errors don’t stop being errors
    just because there is error recovery.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Jan 27, 2012
    #3
  4. TK <> writes:

    > On 1/27/2012 4:57 AM, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    >> 2012-01-27 12:18, Delois wrote:
    >>
    >>> With point of visitors, your website might be different blocks which are
    >>> designed well and have interest of its functionality only with point of
    >>> search engine

    >>
    >> This looks like a translation. I think many people would prefer reading
    >> the original.
    >>> Your visitors don�t care

    >>
    >> Your message contains an octet outside the ASCII range, yet your message
    >> headers have no character code specification. This is Usenet, not HTML,
    >> but a very similar problem occurs in web authoring. If you cannot handle
    >> this basic issue in a simple context like e-mail, are you competent in
    >> giving advice on more sophisticated authoring issues?

    >
    > As a point of interest, in the op's message the ' (apostrophe)
    > displays correctly. In your quote it displays as a diamond with a ?
    > in the center.


    Your newsreader either guessed correctly or it happened to be set to use
    a default that matched the OP’s encoding. Jukka’s newsreader presumably
    did not guess correctly. The character you describe is Unicode’s
    REPLACEMENT CHARACTER: “used to replace an incoming character whose
    value is unknown[...]†so, in some sense, his message did display the
    character correctly!

    The original message had an octet whose value was 146 (hex 92). In most
    Windows single-byte encodings this is a right single quote (the
    preferred character to use for apostrophe, despite the name).

    --
    Ben.
     
    Ben Bacarisse, Jan 27, 2012
    #4
  5. Jukka K. Korpela

    MVP Guest

    I try to make sure my pages are as compliant as possible. This way there is
    a higher probability they will be rendered as expected.

    Once the HTML5 approval processes is done then far better looking web
    content will be possible but the complexity will need advanced editing
    tools.


    http://www.hardcore-games.tk http://www.windows-it.tk
     
    MVP, Feb 4, 2012
    #5
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