Re: Wish to learn HTML

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Jeremy J Starcher, Nov 15, 2010.

  1. On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 17:22:33 +0000, Frederick Williams wrote:

    > I wish to learn HTML and would welcome suggestions of books to read, and
    > editors and browsers to employ.
    >
    > TIA


    IMHO, one of the biggest things that gets people in trouble when trying ot
    learn HTML is winging it and not taking the time to learn the few (but
    not easily remembered) rules about laying out documents.

    HTML tags that do not "nest" properly cause more grief because every
    browser out there has a different method of deciding exactly how they are
    going to correct the problem... Let me give you an example.


    This is well formed:
    <p>The last word of this paragraph will be <strong>strong</strong>.</p>

    However, this is not.
    <p>The last word of this paragraph will be <strong>strong.</p>

    Note how the '<strong>' element is not closed. The browser may decided
    that since you are closing the paragraph that you really meant for the
    STRONG element to be closed as well, but it may *also* decide that since
    you left the STRONG element open, you mean for the rest of the document
    to be strong.

    Both are *equally correct* responses to being given bad input. When I
    teach people HTML, I teach them how to use the W3C validator and to check
    their markup. If you keep your markup clean, there are a lot less
    surprises for you...

    Many, if not most of us, who are able to markup that simply *works* on
    whatever browser we throw it at do so by writing good solid and *clean*
    markup.

    Every time I get my hands on a new web browser, the first thing I do is
    check my most important pages and see how they look. Outside of Netscape
    version 6, my documents have simply worked in every browser I've tried
    from IE1 to Firefox 4, Chrome, Opera and Safari.
    Jeremy J Starcher, Nov 15, 2010
    #1
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  2. Jeremy J Starcher

    dorayme Guest

    In article <ywfEo.26226$>,
    Jeremy J Starcher <> wrote:

    ....

    > HTML tags that do not "nest" properly cause more grief because every
    > browser out there has a different method of deciding exactly how they are
    > going to correct the problem... Let me give you an example.
    >
    >
    > This is well formed:
    > <p>The last word of this paragraph will be <strong>strong</strong>.</p>
    >
    > However, this is not.
    > <p>The last word of this paragraph will be <strong>strong.</p>
    >
    > Note how the '<strong>' element is not closed. The browser may decided
    > that since you are closing the paragraph that you really meant for the
    > STRONG element to be closed as well, but it may *also* decide that since
    > you left the STRONG element open, you mean for the rest of the document
    > to be strong.
    >
    > Both are *equally correct* responses to being given bad input.


    Not bad advice Jeremy but I am skeptical of your example, at
    least where HTML 4 is concerned. Most browsers I know (at least
    the Mac versions) all bold the rest of the text in subsequent
    elements. In fact, that has always been the biggest alarm bell to
    me that I have forgot to tell the browser when to stop bolding.
    Even my MacIE 5 is consistent with all the modern Mac browsers on
    this. Perhaps some Win browsers are the ones you have in mind?

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 15, 2010
    #2
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  3. On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 09:58:30 +1100, dorayme wrote:

    > In article <ywfEo.26226$>,
    > Jeremy J Starcher <> wrote:
    >>
    >> However, this is not.
    >> <p>The last word of this paragraph will be <strong>strong.</p>

    >
    > Not bad advice Jeremy but I am skeptical of your example, at least where
    > HTML 4 is concerned. Most browsers I know (at least the Mac versions)
    > all bold the rest of the text in subsequent elements. In fact, that has
    > always been the biggest alarm bell to me that I have forgot to tell the
    > browser when to stop bolding. Even my MacIE 5 is consistent with all the
    > modern Mac browsers on this. Perhaps some Win browsers are the ones you
    > have in mind?


    I'm pretty sure that most browsers do error correct in the way you are
    used to seeing, but my point was -- error correcting the other way is
    also a valid response to bad input.

    (I know for a fact that IE and Firefox have very different opinions about
    how to handle improperly nested CENTER tags. It drove me nuts in a user-
    script I was writing.)
    Jeremy J Starcher, Nov 17, 2010
    #3
  4. Jeremy J Starcher

    dorayme Guest

    In article <flYEo.53252$>,
    Jeremy J Starcher <> wrote:

    > On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 09:58:30 +1100, dorayme wrote:
    >
    > > In article <ywfEo.26226$>,
    > > Jeremy J Starcher <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> However, this is not.
    > >> <p>The last word of this paragraph will be <strong>strong.</p>

    > >
    > > Not bad advice Jeremy but I am skeptical of your example, at least where
    > > HTML 4 is concerned. Most browsers I know (at least the Mac versions)
    > > all bold the rest of the text in subsequent elements. In fact, that has
    > > always been the biggest alarm bell to me that I have forgot to tell the
    > > browser when to stop bolding. Even my MacIE 5 is consistent with all the
    > > modern Mac browsers on this. Perhaps some Win browsers are the ones you
    > > have in mind?

    >
    > I'm pretty sure that most browsers do error correct in the way you are
    > used to seeing, but my point was -- error correcting the other way is
    > also a valid response to bad input.
    >


    Not sure it should be called error correction when it lets the
    bolding go on and on? If it *stopped* the bolding (your other
    alternative mentioned) at the paragraph close tag, that might be
    a guess at what was intended by a human and more appropriately
    called error correction.

    > (I know for a fact that IE and Firefox have very different opinions about
    > how to handle improperly nested CENTER tags. It drove me nuts in a user-
    > script I was writing.)


    My sympathies! <g>

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 18, 2010
    #4
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