RELEASED Python 2.3 (final)

Discussion in 'Python' started by Barry A. Warsaw, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. On behalf of the Python development team and the Python community, I'm
    happy to announce the release of Python 2.3 (final).

    Nineteen months in the making, Python 2.3 represents a commitment to
    stability and improved performance, with a minimum of new language
    features. Countless bugs and memory leaks have been fixed, many new
    and updated modules have been added, and the new type/class system
    introduced in Python 2.2 has been significantly improved. Python 2.3
    can be up to 30% faster than Python 2.2.

    For more information on Python 2.3, including download links for
    various platforms, release notes, and known issues, please see:

    http://www.python.org/2.3

    Highlights of this new release include:

    - A brand new version of IDLE, the Python IDE, from the IDLEfork
    project at SourceForge.

    - Many new and improved library modules including: sets, heapq,
    datetime, textwrap, optparse, logging, bsddb, bz2, tarfile,
    ossaudiodev, itertools, platform, csv, timeit, shelve,
    DocXMLRPCServer, imaplib, imp, trace, and a new random number
    generator based on the highly acclaimed Mersenne Twister algorithm
    (with a period of 2**19937-1). Some obsolete modules have been
    deprecated.

    - New and improved built-ins including:
    o enumerate(): an iterator yielding (index, item) pairs
    o sum(): a new function to sum a sequence of numbers
    o basestring: an abstract base string type for str and unicode
    o bool: a proper type with instances True and False
    o compile(), eval(), exec: fully support Unicode, and allow input
    not ending in a newline
    o range(): support for long arguments (magnitude > sys.maxint)
    o dict(): new constructor signatures
    o filter(): returns Unicode when the input is Unicode
    o int() can now return long
    o isinstance(), super(): Now support instances whose type() is not
    equal to their __class__. super() no longer ignores data
    descriptors, except for __class__.
    o raw_input(): can now return Unicode objects
    o slice(), buffer(): are now types rather than functions

    - Many new doctest extensions, allowing them to be run by unittest.

    - Extended slices, e.g. "hello"[::-1] returns "olleh".

    - Universal newlines mode for reading files (converts \r, \n and \r\n
    all into \n).

    - Source code encoding declarations. (PEP 263)

    - Import from zip files. (PEP 273 and PEP 302)

    - FutureWarning issued for "unsigned" operations on ints. (PEP 237)

    - Faster list.sort() is now stable.

    - Unicode filenames on Windows. (PEP 227)

    - Karatsuba long multiplication (running time O(N**1.58) instead of
    O(N**2)).

    - pickle, cPickle, and copy support a new pickling protocol for more
    efficient pickling of (especially) new-style class instances.

    - The socket module now supports optional timeouts on all operations.

    - ssl support has been incorporated into the Windows installer.

    - Many improvements to Tkinter.

    Python 2.3 contains many other improvements, including the adoption of
    many Python Enhancement Proposals (PEPs). For details see:

    http://www.python.org/2.3/highlights.html

    Enjoy.

    happy-50th-birthday-geddy-ly y'rs,
    -Barry

    Barry Warsaw

    Python 2.3 Release Manager
    (and the PythonLabs team: Tim, Fred, Jeremy, and Guido)
    Barry A. Warsaw, Jul 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Barry A. Warsaw wrote:
    > On behalf of the Python development team and the Python community, I'm
    > happy to announce the release of Python 2.3 (final).


    kudo

    1 : AWARD, HONOR <a score of honorary degrees and... other kudos -- Time>
    2 : COMPLIMENT, PRAISE <to all three should go some kind of special kudo for
    refusing to succumb -- Al Hine>

    (M-W)

    --Irmen de Jong
    Irmen de Jong, Jul 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Barry A. Warsaw

    John Machin Guest

    Irmen de Jong <> wrote in message news:<3f27bacd$0$49113$4all.nl>...
    > Barry A. Warsaw wrote:
    > > On behalf of the Python development team and the Python community, I'm
    > > happy to announce the release of Python 2.3 (final).

    >
    > kudo
    >
    > 1 : AWARD, HONOR <a score of honorary degrees and... other kudos -- Time>
    > 2 : COMPLIMENT, PRAISE <to all three should go some kind of special kudo for
    > refusing to succumb -- Al Hine>
    >
    > (M-W)
    >
    > --Irmen de Jong


    Ahem ... pardon the pedantry, but "kudos" is a mass noun, not the
    plural of a count noun. Even were this not so, the development team
    (which is singular not only in the counting sense but also in the
    sense of being remarkable) deserves more than a single kudo per
    member.

    So ... could we please change that to "much kudos"?
    John Machin, Jul 30, 2003
    #3
  4. Barry A. Warsaw

    Ben Finney Guest

    On 30 Jul 2003 19:28:57 -0700, Asun Friere wrote:
    > I believe it is customary to use the construction 'great kudos,'
    > which, in any case, you all deserve.


    Or 'totally mega kudos, d00dZ' depending which decade you're living in.

    --
    \ "He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let |
    `\ that fool you. He really is an idiot." -- Groucho Marx |
    _o__) |
    Ben Finney <http://bignose.squidly.org/>
    Ben Finney, Jul 31, 2003
    #4
  5. Barry A. Warsaw

    Asun Friere Guest

    (Aahz) wrote in message news:<bg9hgu$k31$>...
    > In article <>,
    > John Machin <> wrote:
    > >
    > >So ... could we please change that to "much kudos"?

    >
    > Nope. Kudos is a mass noun, but it's a discrete mass noun. So you need
    > to say "many kudos".


    I believe it is customary to use the construction 'great kudos,'
    which, in any case, you all deserve.
    Asun Friere, Jul 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Barry A. Warsaw

    Carl Banks Guest

    Asun Friere wrote:
    > (Aahz) wrote in message news:<bg9hgu$k31$>...
    >> In article <>,
    >> John Machin <> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >So ... could we please change that to "much kudos"?

    >>
    >> Nope. Kudos is a mass noun, but it's a discrete mass noun. So you need
    >> to say "many kudos".

    >
    > I believe it is customary to use the construction 'great kudos,'
    > which, in any case, you all deserve.



    Am I the only person to say "kudoi to everyone"?


    --
    CARL BANKS
    Carl Banks, Jul 31, 2003
    #6
  7. Ben Finney wrote:
    > Or 'totally mega kudos, d00dZ' depending which decade you're living in.


    rather, "Thanx 2 all developers 4 ur 1337 c0D1ng Skilzz!!!"
    Irmen de Jong, Jul 31, 2003
    #7
  8. Barry A. Warsaw

    Alan Kennedy Guest

    [Carl Banks]
    > Am I the only person to say "kudoi to everyone"?


    I've never heard anyone say "kudoi". But I suppose it's all about
    whether you consider "kudos" to be singular or plural. If it's
    singular, then "kudoi" is the only correct (Greek) plural of the
    (Greek) singular "kudos".

    So all of those Americans who seem intent on turning "kudos" into the
    plural of "kudo" (which does not exist, yet) should heed your advice
    :)

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=kudos

    But, of course, the main point of the whole thread is to confer kudos,
    i.e. "acclaim or praise for exceptional achievement", on the Python
    Development Team.

    Thanks People!

    regards,

    --
    alan kennedy
    -----------------------------------------------------
    check http headers here: http://xhaus.com/headers
    email alan: http://xhaus.com/mailto/alan
    Alan Kennedy, Jul 31, 2003
    #8
  9. On Thu, 31 Jul 2003 12:09:09 +0100, Robin Becker <> wrote:

    >I've been testing reportlab with 2.3 and although it's a lot faster I
    >get some ominous warnings and complaints from the future.
    >
    >1) SyntaxWarning: assignment to None
    > eg for None, name in colorNamePairs:
    > what is the preferred way to do this nowadays? It's fairly
    > trivial to go through and change these to for notUsed, x in ....
    > but is there a nicer way.

    I don't know of one, but sometimes I've wanted a way to filter sequence unpacking, e.g,
    a,*,c = 1,2,3 # <=> a=1; c=3
    and maybe letting ** in the tail position mean dump the rest.


    >2) FutureWarning: hex/oct constants > sys.maxint will return positive
    > values in Python 2.4 and up
    > eg self.assertEquals(ttf.read_ulong(), 0x81020304) # big-endian
    > Is there no way to preserve the clarity of the above in future?
    > We have quite a lot of code that deals with low level binary
    > formatted stuff. Changing will move it further away from the
    > original C definitions.


    How about just defining a C integer class that works as desired?
    You could do it in C ;-)

    >
    > The same applies to
    >
    > FutureWarning: x<<y losing bits or changing sign will return a long
    > in Python 2.4 and up
    > eg sum = (hi << 16) | (lo & 0xFFFF)
    >
    > Is Python moving away from the machinery? Are there efficient
    > recipes for doing these 32 bit operations? Certainly cut and
    > paste to and from java/c/c++ will be a lot harder.
    >

    IWT a C extension could be quite efficient. The question would be how
    to minimize the editing for cut/pasted stuff. Mostly I guess it would
    be wrapping C literals so x = 0x80000000 becomes x = Cint('0x80000000') or such.

    >Apart from these minor troubles seems pretty solid.

    Sounds good.

    Regards,
    Bengt Richter
    Bengt Richter, Jul 31, 2003
    #9
  10. Barry A. Warsaw

    Terry Reedy Guest

    "Irmen de Jong" <> wrote in message
    news:3f28e998$0$49107$4all.nl...
    > Ben Finney wrote:
    > > Or 'totally mega kudos, d00dZ' depending which decade you're

    living in.
    >
    > rather, "Thanx 2 all developers 4 ur 1337 c0D1ng Skilzz!!!"


    Not being (001 with 1337speak, I googled '1337'
    and found this site (#12) that deigned to explain:

    http://www.1337-online.com/whatis1337.php
    Terry Reedy, Jul 31, 2003
    #10
  11. Barry A. Warsaw

    John Baxter Guest

    In article <bg9hgu$k31$>, (Aahz)
    wrote:

    > Nope. Kudos is a mass noun, but it's a discrete mass noun. So you need
    > to say "many kudos". This bit of pedantry is brought to you by "much
    > kudo about nothing".


    Sometimes, the indiscrete mass nouns are more fun. ;-)

    (Perhaps not for major college football coaches, for whom anything
    indiscrete can be harmful.)

    All this aside, heaps of praise and copious congratulations to all
    involved in the release (you know who you are).

    And thank you!

    --John
    John Baxter, Aug 1, 2003
    #11
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