reportlab and python 3

Discussion in 'Python' started by Laszlo Nagy, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. Laszlo Nagy

    Laszlo Nagy Guest

    Reportlab is on the wall of shame. http://python3wos.appspot.com/

    Is there other ways to create PDF files from python 3? There is pyPdf. I
    haven't tried it yet, but it seem that it is a low level library. It
    does not handle "flowables" that are automatically split across pages.
    It does not handle "table headers" that are repeated automatically on
    the top of every page (when the table does not fit on a page). I need a
    higher level API, with features compareable to reportlab. Is there such
    thing?

    Thanks,

    Laszlo
    Laszlo Nagy, Sep 17, 2012
    #1
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  2. Laszlo Nagy

    Guest

    Le lundi 17 septembre 2012 10:48:30 UTC+2, Laszlo Nagy a écrit :
    > Reportlab is on the wall of shame. http://python3wos.appspot.com/
    >
    >
    >
    > Is there other ways to create PDF files from python 3? There is pyPdf. I
    >
    > haven't tried it yet, but it seem that it is a low level library. It
    >
    > does not handle "flowables" that are automatically split across pages.
    >
    > It does not handle "table headers" that are repeated automatically on
    >
    > the top of every page (when the table does not fit on a page). I need a
    >
    > higher level API, with features compareable to reportlab. Is there such
    >
    > thing?
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    >
    > Laszlo


    A big yes and it is very easy. I assume you know how
    to write a plain text file with Python :).

    Use your Python to generate a .tex file and let it compile
    with one of the pdf TeX engines.

    Potential problems:
    - It requires a TeX installation (a no problem).
    - Of course I requires some TeX knowledge. Learning it
    is not so complicate. Learn how to use TeX with a text
    editor and you will quickly understand what you have to
    program in Python. Bonus: you learn at the same time
    a good text editing engine.

    I can not figure out something more simple, versatile and
    powerful.

    jmf
    , Sep 18, 2012
    #2
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  3. Laszlo Nagy

    Guest

    Le lundi 17 septembre 2012 10:48:30 UTC+2, Laszlo Nagy a écrit :
    > Reportlab is on the wall of shame. http://python3wos.appspot.com/
    >
    >
    >
    > Is there other ways to create PDF files from python 3? There is pyPdf. I
    >
    > haven't tried it yet, but it seem that it is a low level library. It
    >
    > does not handle "flowables" that are automatically split across pages.
    >
    > It does not handle "table headers" that are repeated automatically on
    >
    > the top of every page (when the table does not fit on a page). I need a
    >
    > higher level API, with features compareable to reportlab. Is there such
    >
    > thing?
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    >
    > Laszlo


    A big yes and it is very easy. I assume you know how
    to write a plain text file with Python :).

    Use your Python to generate a .tex file and let it compile
    with one of the pdf TeX engines.

    Potential problems:
    - It requires a TeX installation (a no problem).
    - Of course I requires some TeX knowledge. Learning it
    is not so complicate. Learn how to use TeX with a text
    editor and you will quickly understand what you have to
    program in Python. Bonus: you learn at the same time
    a good text editing engine.

    I can not figure out something more simple, versatile and
    powerful.

    jmf
    , Sep 18, 2012
    #3
  4. Laszlo Nagy

    Laszlo Nagy Guest


    > A big yes and it is very easy. I assume you know how
    > to write a plain text file with Python :).
    >
    > Use your Python to generate a .tex file and let it compile
    > with one of the pdf TeX engines.
    >
    > Potential problems:
    > - It requires a TeX installation (a no problem).
    > - Of course I requires some TeX knowledge. Learning it
    > is not so complicate. Learn how to use TeX with a text
    > editor and you will quickly understand what you have to
    > program in Python. Bonus: you learn at the same time
    > a good text editing engine.
    >
    > I can not figure out something more simple, versatile and
    > powerful.
    >
    > jmf
    >

    This is a good idea. Thank you. I wanted to learn TeX anyway. The TeX
    installation is problematic. I also want to use this under MS Windows.
    Yes, I know here is MikTeX for Windows. But there is significant
    difference. ReportLab can be embedded into a small program created with
    py2exe. LaTeX on the other side is a 150MB separate installation package
    that must be installed separately by hand.

    But in my particular case, it is still a good solution.

    Thanks,

    Laszlo
    Laszlo Nagy, Sep 18, 2012
    #4
  5. Laszlo Nagy

    Guest

    Le mardi 18 septembre 2012 11:04:19 UTC+2, Laszlo Nagy a écrit :
    > > A big yes and it is very easy. I assume you know how

    >
    > > to write a plain text file with Python :).

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Use your Python to generate a .tex file and let it compile

    >
    > > with one of the pdf TeX engines.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Potential problems:

    >
    > > - It requires a TeX installation (a no problem).

    >
    > > - Of course I requires some TeX knowledge. Learning it

    >
    > > is not so complicate. Learn how to use TeX with a text

    >
    > > editor and you will quickly understand what you have to

    >
    > > program in Python. Bonus: you learn at the same time

    >
    > > a good text editing engine.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I can not figure out something more simple, versatile and

    >
    > > powerful.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > jmf

    >
    > >

    >
    > This is a good idea. Thank you. I wanted to learn TeX anyway. The TeX
    >
    > installation is problematic. I also want to use this under MS Windows.
    >
    > Yes, I know here is MikTeX for Windows. But there is significant
    >
    > difference. ReportLab can be embedded into a small program created with
    >
    > py2exe. LaTeX on the other side is a 150MB separate installation package
    >
    > that must be installed separately by hand.
    >
    >
    >
    > But in my particular case, it is still a good solution.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    >
    > Laszlo


    I understood, you have Python on a platform and starting
    from this you wish to create pdf files.
    Obviously, embedding "TeX" is practically a no solution,
    although distibuting a portable standalone TeX distribution
    is a perfectly viable solution, especially on Windows!

    To "I wanted to learn TeX anyway.":
    I can only warmly recommend to start with one of the two
    unicode compliant engines, LuaTeX or XeTeX.

    jmf
    , Sep 18, 2012
    #5
  6. Laszlo Nagy

    Guest

    Le mardi 18 septembre 2012 11:04:19 UTC+2, Laszlo Nagy a écrit :
    > > A big yes and it is very easy. I assume you know how

    >
    > > to write a plain text file with Python :).

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Use your Python to generate a .tex file and let it compile

    >
    > > with one of the pdf TeX engines.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Potential problems:

    >
    > > - It requires a TeX installation (a no problem).

    >
    > > - Of course I requires some TeX knowledge. Learning it

    >
    > > is not so complicate. Learn how to use TeX with a text

    >
    > > editor and you will quickly understand what you have to

    >
    > > program in Python. Bonus: you learn at the same time

    >
    > > a good text editing engine.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I can not figure out something more simple, versatile and

    >
    > > powerful.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > jmf

    >
    > >

    >
    > This is a good idea. Thank you. I wanted to learn TeX anyway. The TeX
    >
    > installation is problematic. I also want to use this under MS Windows.
    >
    > Yes, I know here is MikTeX for Windows. But there is significant
    >
    > difference. ReportLab can be embedded into a small program created with
    >
    > py2exe. LaTeX on the other side is a 150MB separate installation package
    >
    > that must be installed separately by hand.
    >
    >
    >
    > But in my particular case, it is still a good solution.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    >
    > Laszlo


    I understood, you have Python on a platform and starting
    from this you wish to create pdf files.
    Obviously, embedding "TeX" is practically a no solution,
    although distibuting a portable standalone TeX distribution
    is a perfectly viable solution, especially on Windows!

    To "I wanted to learn TeX anyway.":
    I can only warmly recommend to start with one of the two
    unicode compliant engines, LuaTeX or XeTeX.

    jmf
    , Sep 18, 2012
    #6
  7. Laszlo Nagy

    Laszlo Nagy Guest


    > I understood, you have Python on a platform and starting
    > from this you wish to create pdf files.
    > Obviously, embedding "TeX" is practically a no solution,
    > although distibuting a portable standalone TeX distribution
    > is a perfectly viable solution, especially on Windows!
    >
    > To "I wanted to learn TeX anyway.":
    > I can only warmly recommend to start with one of the two
    > unicode compliant engines, LuaTeX or XeTeX.

    All right. Which one is the better? :) I'm totally a beginner. I would
    also like to use mathematical expressions but I guess they are both
    capable of that. Another requirement would be: easy installation under
    unix and windows, good multilingual support.
    Laszlo Nagy, Sep 18, 2012
    #7
  8. Laszlo Nagy

    Guest

    Le mardi 18 septembre 2012 15:31:52 UTC+2, Laszlo Nagy a écrit :
    > > I understood, you have Python on a platform and starting

    >
    > > from this you wish to create pdf files.

    >
    > > Obviously, embedding "TeX" is practically a no solution,

    >
    > > although distibuting a portable standalone TeX distribution

    >
    > > is a perfectly viable solution, especially on Windows!

    >
    > >

    >
    > > To "I wanted to learn TeX anyway.":

    >
    > > I can only warmly recommend to start with one of the two

    >
    > > unicode compliant engines, LuaTeX or XeTeX.

    >
    > All right. Which one is the better? :) I'm totally a beginner. I would
    >
    > also like to use mathematical expressions but I guess they are both
    >
    > capable of that. Another requirement would be: easy installation under
    >
    > unix and windows, good multilingual support.


    I basically recommend nothing. I pointed the LuaTeX or
    Xe(La)TeX engines because there are the unicode compliant
    engines. Today, most of the work target these engines.

    By Unicode compliance, you should not understand only
    the coding of characters, but everything which is related
    to the unicode technology (characters, unicode features,
    typography, font technology).

    "...good multilingual support. ..."
    Don't worry. It's much better than the future of Python ;-)

    FYI I'm not a expert. I have only accumulated experience, I wrote
    my first TeX document 20(?) years ago. Now, I use XeLaTeX from
    MiKTeX on Win7. Why? Answer: why not?

    jmf
    , Sep 18, 2012
    #8
  9. Laszlo Nagy

    Guest

    Le mardi 18 septembre 2012 15:31:52 UTC+2, Laszlo Nagy a écrit :
    > > I understood, you have Python on a platform and starting

    >
    > > from this you wish to create pdf files.

    >
    > > Obviously, embedding "TeX" is practically a no solution,

    >
    > > although distibuting a portable standalone TeX distribution

    >
    > > is a perfectly viable solution, especially on Windows!

    >
    > >

    >
    > > To "I wanted to learn TeX anyway.":

    >
    > > I can only warmly recommend to start with one of the two

    >
    > > unicode compliant engines, LuaTeX or XeTeX.

    >
    > All right. Which one is the better? :) I'm totally a beginner. I would
    >
    > also like to use mathematical expressions but I guess they are both
    >
    > capable of that. Another requirement would be: easy installation under
    >
    > unix and windows, good multilingual support.


    I basically recommend nothing. I pointed the LuaTeX or
    Xe(La)TeX engines because there are the unicode compliant
    engines. Today, most of the work target these engines.

    By Unicode compliance, you should not understand only
    the coding of characters, but everything which is related
    to the unicode technology (characters, unicode features,
    typography, font technology).

    "...good multilingual support. ..."
    Don't worry. It's much better than the future of Python ;-)

    FYI I'm not a expert. I have only accumulated experience, I wrote
    my first TeX document 20(?) years ago. Now, I use XeLaTeX from
    MiKTeX on Win7. Why? Answer: why not?

    jmf
    , Sep 18, 2012
    #9
  10. Laszlo Nagy

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 9/18/2012 9:31 AM, Laszlo Nagy wrote:

    > capable of that. Another requirement would be: easy installation under
    > unix and windows, good multilingual support.


    By using 3.3, your Python string manipulations will act the same on all
    platforms, even when using extended plane (non-BMP) characters.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
    Terry Reedy, Sep 18, 2012
    #10
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