Ruby Future Or?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Robert Johns, May 15, 2011.

  1. Robert Johns

    Robert Johns Guest

    I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    want to code in rails.

    Thanks

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
     
    Robert Johns, May 15, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. I guess it depends on what you mean by "having a future". Ruby's never
    going to compete on a performance basis with, say, C or x86, no
    matter how good it gets (unless there's a radical transformation in
    how the language works). But that's okay, because every language is
    good at different things. Ruby is great for a sizable number of those
    things (expressive domain modeling, scripting, web applications,
    etc.), at the expense of being less good for some of them (shuttle
    launch software, onboard missile guidance, etc.).

    It's always up to the developer to pick the right tool for the job,
    not the popular tool for the job.
    --
    John Feminella
    Principal Consultant, BitsBuilder
    LI: http://www.linkedin.com/in/johnxf
    SO: http://stackoverflow.com/users/75170/



    On Sun, May 15, 2011 at 07:31, Robert Johns <> wrote:
    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    > want to code in rails.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > --
    > Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    >
    >
     
    John Feminella, May 15, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 15.05.2011 13:31, Robert Johns wrote:
    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    > want to code in rails.


    If I could answer your question I would be in possession of a crystal
    ball and be making money predicting lottery results of next week.

    Don't speculate too much. As long as there are enough people using Ruby
    it will stay. Remember when they said Cobol was dead? That must be
    ages already and what happened: there are still Cobol coders around. I
    just yesterday talked to one in person.

    Cheers

    robert

    --
    remember.guy do |as, often| as.you_can - without end
    http://blog.rubybestpractices.com/
     
    Robert Klemme, May 15, 2011
    #3
  4. On 05/15/11 22:00, Robert Klemme wrote:
    > there are still Cobol coders around. I just
    > yesterday talked to one in person.


    ahh, but did s/he answer you? :p

    (ref to Wayne and Shuster)
     
    Clifford Heath, May 15, 2011
    #4
  5. On 15.05.2011 14:57, Clifford Heath wrote:
    > On 05/15/11 22:00, Robert Klemme wrote:
    >> there are still Cobol coders around. I just
    >> yesterday talked to one in person.

    >
    > ahh, but did s/he answer you? :p
    >
    > (ref to Wayne and Shuster)


    Yes, she did! :)

    robert

    --
    remember.guy do |as, often| as.you_can - without end
    http://blog.rubybestpractices.com/
     
    Robert Klemme, May 15, 2011
    #5
  6. On 05/15/2011 04:31 AM, Robert Johns wrote:
    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    > want to code in rails.


    Well, what kind of code _do_ you want to write? There are still some of
    us here who use ruby for things other than rails.
     
    Joel VanderWerf, May 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Robert Johns

    Stu Guest

    Python and Ruby are pretty much in the same boat. Python won't be the
    Ruby killer. Ruby is also widely accepted at this time. It's concepts
    and paradigm will be around for along time to come. If anything has
    changed in the last decade maybe perl usage has slowed down. But perl
    is not going anywhere anytime soon. Even awk is still used today.
    Maybe not to the extent it was twenty and thirty years ago but it's
    still a useful tool for what it's meant for.

    I realize you have no interest in rails. There are many tools to
    create dynamic web projects with. Many gems in the ruby world to aid
    to that effect without using rails. Now the politics of evaluating and
    educating your 'pointy haired boss' what tools and frameworks to use
    outside of rails is left to your own discretion. I realize this wont
    be simple task because your employer most likely has been pounded with
    buzz terms such as 'agile' 'web2.0' 'refactoring' 'cloud' 'scrum'
    'tdd' 'bdd' 'ruby on rails' 'ajax' and probably would have never heard
    of this programming language from the far east if it wasn't for the
    buzz in the last several years.

    I wouldn't worry to much though about displacement. Ruby is here to stay.

    On Sun, May 15, 2011 at 6:31 AM, Robert Johns <> wrote:
    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    > want to code in rails.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > --
    > Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    >
    >
     
    Stu, May 15, 2011
    #7
  8. On 15/05/11 14:31 , Robert Johns wrote:
    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    > want to code in rails.
    >

    Been coding in Ruby since 2001 and I've never done Rails while I have
    done only minimal web application programming.
    In the last 5 years I code almost exclusively in Ruby mostly building
    tools that build tools, that build tools ad infinitum.
    When I started I was the only person using Ruby in my firm and in any of
    my client's firms.
    There used to be the Python vs. Ruby question in our ptojects but that
    has stopped being asked now as there's at least 10 people with
    significant Ruby experience in the firm and we have a whole heap of
    tools and knowledge to fall back on.
    So no, I don't see Ruby going away anytime soon.
    Cheers,
    V.-

    --
    http://www.ampelofilosofies.gr
     
    Vassilis Rizopoulos, May 16, 2011
    #8
  9. Robert Johns

    spiralofhope Guest

    On Sun, 15 May 2011 20:31:39 +0900
    Robert Johns <> wrote:

    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have
    > no want to code in rails.


    I was thinking today and I was wondering if apples have a future when
    oranges are being widely accepted. Outside of apple pie, because I
    have no want to eat apples. =)

    Perhaps you are asking: "Do you think that in the future I will be able
    to find work programming with Ruby, even if I don't want to program
    with Rails?"


    --
    http://spiralofhope.com
     
    spiralofhope, May 16, 2011
    #9
  10. Robert Johns

    Kirk Haines Guest

    On Mon, May 16, 2011 at 12:48 PM, Chad Perrin <> wrote:

    > From what I've seen, Rails is a primary job skill sought by employers.
    > Ruby without Rails, however, seems to be just a "bonus", if employers
    > notice it at all.


    It depends. We (Engine Yard) employ several people for whom Ruby
    related work is their daily bread and butter, but those people do not
    spend their days writing Rails apps.


    Kirk Haines
    Software Guy
    Engine Yard
     
    Kirk Haines, May 16, 2011
    #10
  11. On May 15, 1:25=A0pm, Stu <> wrote:
    > Python and Ruby are pretty much in the same boat. Python won't be the
    > Ruby killer.


    My prediction? Javascript eventually kills the other dynamic languages
    in the web development arena. Why use two languages when you can use
    one?

    Regards,

    Dan
     
    Daniel Berger, May 16, 2011
    #11
  12. Robert Johns

    spiralofhope Guest

    On Tue, 17 May 2011 06:20:54 +0900
    Daniel Berger <> wrote:

    > My prediction? Javascript eventually kills the other dynamic languages
    > in the web development arena. Why use two languages when you can use
    > one?


    I agree, but only in the sense that there are some fantastic tools[1]
    out there which abstract things and present an alternate syntax.

    Variety is demanded when people disagree strongly on the use of a
    single tool. But if that single tool has a way of being used
    differently by those different people, then less people will disagree,
    and less strongly.

    [1] The one example that comes to mind is http://jquery.com/


    --
    http://spiralofhope.com
     
    spiralofhope, May 16, 2011
    #12
  13. Robert Johns

    Stu Guest

    Seeing that I was referring to UNIX shell scripting I don't see how
    this applies.

    On Mon, May 16, 2011 at 4:20 PM, Daniel Berger <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > On May 15, 1:25=A0pm, Stu <> wrote:
    >> Python and Ruby are pretty much in the same boat. Python won't be the
    >> Ruby killer.

    >
    > My prediction? Javascript eventually kills the other dynamic languages
    > in the web development arena. Why use two languages when you can use
    > one?
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Dan
    >
    >
     
    Stu, May 16, 2011
    #13
  14. Robert Johns

    Zach Dennis Guest

    [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

    On Sun, May 15, 2011 at 7:31 AM, Robert Johns <> wrote:

    > I was thinking today and I was wondering if ruby has a future when
    > python is being to widely accepted. Outside of rails, because I have no
    > want to code in rails.
    >


    I found it interesting to see Walter Bright (creator of D) comment in an
    interview that he thought Ruby was the language to watch (see the very last
    question in the interview):

    http://www.bitwisemag.com/copy/programming/d/interview/d_programming_language.html


    --
    Zach Dennis
    http://www.continuousthinking.com (personal)
    http://www.mutuallyhuman.com (hire me)
    http://ideafoundry.info/behavior-driven-development (first rate BDD
    training)
    @zachdennis (twitter)
     
    Zach Dennis, May 16, 2011
    #14
  15. Robert Johns

    Thiel Chang Guest

    Op 16-5-2011 23:49, spiralofhope schreef:
    > On Tue, 17 May 2011 06:20:54 +0900
    > Daniel Berger<> wrote:
    >
    >> My prediction? Javascript eventually kills the other dynamic languages
    >> in the web development arena. Why use two languages when you can use
    >> one?

    > I agree, but only in the sense that there are some fantastic tools[1]
    > out there which abstract things and present an alternate syntax.
    >
    > Variety is demanded when people disagree strongly on the use of a
    > single tool. But if that single tool has a way of being used
    > differently by those different people, then less people will disagree,
    > and less strongly.
    >
    > [1] The one example that comes to mind is http://jquery.com/
    >
    >

    I disagree with Daniel. Program languages cannot be predicted. Distrust
    anyone who claims to know the programming language future, however dimly.
    If astrology worked, all astrologers would be rich. :)

    Thiel Chang
     
    Thiel Chang, May 16, 2011
    #15
  16. On 5/16/11 4:17 PM, Thiel Chang wrote:
    > Op 16-5-2011 23:49, spiralofhope schreef:
    >> On Tue, 17 May 2011 06:20:54 +0900
    >> Daniel Berger<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> My prediction? Javascript eventually kills the other dynamic languages
    >>> in the web development arena. Why use two languages when you can use
    >>> one?

    >> I agree, but only in the sense that there are some fantastic tools[1]
    >> out there which abstract things and present an alternate syntax.
    >>
    >> Variety is demanded when people disagree strongly on the use of a
    >> single tool. But if that single tool has a way of being used
    >> differently by those different people, then less people will disagree,
    >> and less strongly.
    >>
    >> [1] The one example that comes to mind is http://jquery.com/
    >>
    >>

    > I disagree with Daniel. Program languages cannot be predicted. Distrust
    > anyone who claims to know the programming language future, however dimly.
    > If astrology worked, all astrologers would be rich. :)


    If you want to equate 15 years of experience, job trending and tech
    trending to astrology, sure.

    Regards,

    Dan
     
    Daniel Berger, May 17, 2011
    #16
  17. Robert Johns

    Ralf Mueller Guest

    On 05/16/2011 11:20 PM, Daniel Berger wrote:
    >
    > On May 15, 1:25 pm, Stu<> wrote:
    >> Python and Ruby are pretty much in the same boat. Python won't be the
    >> Ruby killer.

    > My prediction? Javascript eventually kills the other dynamic languages
    > in the web development arena. Why use two languages when you can use
    > one?

    Sorry, but this argument just does NOT count (for me). It's leads to the question: Why develop something new?
    The is no language, which can to everything to the utmost satisfaction of every programmer. This will NOT happen.
    In contrast every language has areas, where is works fine and others which are tricky to handle with. Even if
    you stick to web-development (which is itself a large area), JS is not ... let's say that well suited from a
    programmers point of view. I'd love to see a beautifully designed language like Ruby doing client side
    web-programming. The other thing is taste: I personally don't like the idea of giving space such a meaning in
    a programming language. That's one of the reasons, I dislike about Python.
    Or in other words: Did we really need a dynamic language after PERL? The answer is YES, isn't it?


    cheers
    ralf
     
    Ralf Mueller, May 17, 2011
    #17
  18. I'd love to see a beautifully designed language like Ruby doing client side
    > web-programming.


    Well, not exactly what you want, but take a look at http://jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script/


    Regards,
    Rimantas
     
    Rimantas Liubertas, May 17, 2011
    #18
  19. Robert Johns

    7stud -- Guest

    > The other thing is taste: I personally don't like the
    > idea of giving space such a meaning in
    > a programming language. That's one of the reasons,
    > I dislike about Python.


    Do you really think all those cascading 'ends' in Ruby (that you can
    never get right nor locate the missing 'end') are better?

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
     
    7stud --, May 18, 2011
    #19
  20. Robert Johns

    Sam Duncan Guest

    Hrm, peach or nectarine, peach or nectarine ...

    Sooo hard to choose which tasty nutritious stone fruit to eat. But once
    I do, the eaters of that OTHER tasty stone fruit are gonna hear about
    it, that's for darn tootin'.


    On 18/05/11 11:49, 7stud -- wrote:
    >> The other thing is taste: I personally don't like the
    >> idea of giving space such a meaning in
    >> a programming language. That's one of the reasons,
    >> I dislike about Python.

    > Do you really think all those cascading 'ends' in Ruby (that you can
    > never get right nor locate the missing 'end') are better?
    >
     
    Sam Duncan, May 18, 2011
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Erik Terpstra
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    85
    Raphael Bauduin
    Mar 3, 2004
  2. Kevin Howe

    Ruby's future

    Kevin Howe, Aug 2, 2004, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    107
    Robert Klemme
    Aug 3, 2004
  3. Joan Iglesias

    the future of Ruby

    Joan Iglesias, Sep 16, 2006, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    33
    Views:
    338
    Mauricio Fernandez
    Sep 19, 2006
  4. Lex Williams

    future ruby books?

    Lex Williams, Sep 29, 2008, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    104
    Fernando Perez
    Oct 2, 2008
  5. Michael Kaelbling

    RFC Future Ruby hash literal syntax

    Michael Kaelbling, Nov 29, 2010, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    267
    Ryan Davis
    Dec 1, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page