Rum-Time Library vs Standard Library

Discussion in 'C++' started by Carmen Sei, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. Carmen Sei

    Carmen Sei Guest

    Carmen Sei, Mar 5, 2008
    #1
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  2. On Tue, 2008-03-04 at 16:29 -0800, Carmen Sei wrote:
    > what are the difference between
    >
    > Rum-Time Library vs Standard Library


    The standard library is a particular set of defined names and headers as
    defined in the C++ standard document, a runtime library is a blob of
    binary stuff that is used as a part of the compiled program but is not
    included in your program executables because it is so commonly needed.
    Instead, those pieces of functionality are included on the host machine
    (although you might need to ask your customers to install an updated
    runtime if they have an older service pack) so they get included into
    your program only at "runtime".

    --
    Tristan Wibberley

    Any opinion expressed is mine (or else I'm playing devils advocate for
    the sake of a good argument). My employer had nothing to do with this
    communication.
    Tristan Wibberley, Mar 5, 2008
    #2
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  3. Carmen Sei

    Paavo Helde Guest

    Paavo Helde, Mar 5, 2008
    #3
  4. Carmen Sei

    Rahul Guest

    On Mar 5, 5:29 am, Carmen Sei <> wrote:
    > what are the difference between
    >
    > Rum-Time Library vs Standard Library
    >
    > http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/li...rosoft.com/en-us/library/59ey50w6(VS.80).aspx


    Many vendors implement c++ standard library as a runtime library... so
    that they get linked dynamically into the program, it makes sure that
    the size of the executable is less...

    Moreover, if the vendor provides a next version of the standard
    library, the developer wouldn't need to re-link his program, instead
    can directly run the executable...the linking in this case would be
    taken care by dynamic linker/loader...
    Rahul, Mar 5, 2008
    #4
  5. Carmen Sei

    James Kanze Guest

    On Mar 5, 1:51 am, Tristan Wibberley <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 2008-03-04 at 16:29 -0800, Carmen Sei wrote:
    > > what are the difference between


    > > Rum-Time Library vs Standard Library


    > The standard library is a particular set of defined names and
    > headers as defined in the C++ standard document, a runtime
    > library is a blob of binary stuff that is used as a part of
    > the compiled program but is not included in your program
    > executables because it is so commonly needed.


    You make it sound as if a runtime library must be dynamically
    linked. That's not true---in the past, they were almost always
    statically linked (if only because the systems back then didn't
    support dynamic linking), and even today, you typically have a
    choice.

    I don't know if there is actually any formal definition of
    runtime library. I've certainly seen it used in the sense of
    any library for which you don't have the source code (or don't
    use the source code, if it's open source). I think I've also
    seen it used in a more restrictive sense, as the library which
    provides the direct interface to the OS. And it's frequently
    used to refer to the "bundled" libraries: those that are always
    present on the machine (or delivered with the compiler).

    FWIW: I'm not even sure that "runtime library" always refers to
    a library. On early Unix, it was common to refer to crt0.o as
    the runtime library, although it was an object file, and not a
    library. (The "crt" in the name was for "C Run Time", and the 0
    because it was the first thing run, before your own code.)

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
    James Kanze, Mar 5, 2008
    #5
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