Screen Resolutions

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Phillip Mann, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. Phillip Mann

    Phillip Mann Guest

    I work on a Web Site and my desktop computer screen resolution is set
    at 800x600.

    I understand most people are using 1024x768 or higher now.

    While writing html, should I set my desktop to the higher resolution
    to be sure the pages look OK in the 1024x768 setting?

    Phil

    www.BluegrassBanjo.com
    www.BluegrassBanjo.org

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    Phillip Mann, Feb 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. Phillip Mann wrote:
    > I work on a Web Site and my desktop computer screen resolution is set
    > at 800x600.
    >
    > I understand most people are using 1024x768 or higher now.
    >
    > While writing html, should I set my desktop to the higher resolution
    > to be sure the pages look OK in the 1024x768 setting?


    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...te for a single resolution&btnG=Google Search
    why you should not design website for a single resolution - Google Search
    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
     
    Jonathan N. Little, Feb 24, 2007
    #2
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  3. Phillip Mann

    cwdjrxyz Guest

    On Feb 24, 10:50 am, Phillip Mann <> wrote:
    > I work on a Web Site and my desktop computer screen resolution is set
    > at 800x600.
    >
    > I understand most people are using 1024x768 or higher now.
    >
    > While writing html, should I set my desktop to the higher resolution
    > to be sure the pages look OK in the 1024x768 setting?


    Some now use well over 1024x768 resolution, and some use very much
    less on some handheld devices, cell phones, etc. If you have an Opera
    browser, you can select the view tab and then select the small screen
    view that shows how your page looks on a very small screen. Or you can
    rather use shift + F11 to do the same thing. If a page views well on
    this small screen setting and on 1024x768, then nearly everyone can
    view it properly. One main thing to watch is how well text reads at
    smaller screen size. Using a fixed font size in pixels often can make
    the text nearly impossible to read on the Opera small screen setting.
     
    cwdjrxyz, Feb 24, 2007
    #3
  4. Phillip Mann wrote:
    > I work on a Web Site and my desktop computer screen resolution is set
    > at 800x600.
    >
    > I understand most people are using 1024x768 or higher now.
    >
    > While writing html, should I set my desktop to the higher resolution
    > to be sure the pages look OK in the 1024x768 setting?


    the main question is:
    if people use high-resolution screens, does that automatically mean,
    that they will surf with their UA window maximsed?

    as a webdesigner you should concentrate your efforts on 'how can I use
    the available space in the best possible way' instead of 'how can design
    for the highest possible screen-resolution'. Design for your audiance
    and not for what is technically possible. It is well possible, that your
    audiance uses 1024x768 screens, but they will never have their UA window
    maximised, so its good practice to (still) design for 800x600 resolutions.

    cheers
    bernhard

    --
    www.daszeichen.ch
    remove nixspam to reply
     
    Bernhard Sturm, Feb 25, 2007
    #4
  5. On 2007-02-25, Bernhard Sturm wrote:
    > Phillip Mann wrote:
    >> I work on a Web Site and my desktop computer screen resolution is set
    >> at 800x600.
    >>
    >> I understand most people are using 1024x768 or higher now.
    >>
    >> While writing html, should I set my desktop to the higher resolution
    >> to be sure the pages look OK in the 1024x768 setting?

    >
    > the main question is:
    > if people use high-resolution screens, does that automatically mean,
    > that they will surf with their UA window maximsed?
    >
    > as a webdesigner you should concentrate your efforts on 'how can I use
    > the available space in the best possible way' instead of 'how can design
    > for the highest possible screen-resolution'. Design for your audiance
    > and not for what is technically possible. It is well possible, that your
    > audiance uses 1024x768 screens, but they will never have their UA window
    > maximised, so its good practice to (still) design for 800x600 resolutions.


    It is not good practice to design for 800x600 resolutions. Window
    size is only one factor. Different users have different default
    text sizes; what works on one user's 800x600 window may not work on
    another user's 800x600 window with a larger font size.

    Avoid specifying any font or window sizes, and let the browser
    adjust the page to fit its window. That is, after all, the default,
    and it is the default for a good reason.

    --
    Chris F.A. Johnson <http://cfaj.freeshell.org>
    ===================================================================
    Author:
    Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach (2005, Apress)
     
    Chris F.A. Johnson, Feb 26, 2007
    #5

  6. >
    > It is not good practice to design for 800x600 resolutions. Window
    > size is only one factor. Different users have different default
    > text sizes; what works on one user's 800x600 window may not work on
    > another user's 800x600 window with a larger font size.


    we are not talking about font-size here, we are talking about the use of
    (available) space. if your point was to advocate for dynamic layouts
    then this would be a different can of worms.

    I was refering to the use of screen space with respect to your intended
    audiance. If you are going to design for 800x600px then you will have to
    deal with a limited amount of space in order to place your layout
    objects. Limitation is always a good practice for a designer, because
    you will have to respect certain design rules.
    And in order to overcome the problem you mentioned, I suggest you use
    only 'em'-units for the position and size of visual elements (and of
    course use the various media-selectors in CSS for non-screen devices).

    cheers
    bernhard

    --
    www.daszeichen.ch
    remove nixspam to reply
     
    Bernhard Sturm, Feb 26, 2007
    #6
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