Sending derived info to e-mail

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Robert Baer, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    In javascript, i do a query that the user does not see, and
    apparently able to get it into HTML (looks like a document page same
    name as HTML page that created the script but only on the screen).
    Ideally,what i would like to do is send this info as if i texted it,
    say to .
    I say "texted" because i want to do this on ANY browser, especially
    cell-phones.
    Which leads me to the question, do ANY "browser-enabled" cell phones
    support JS?
    And if not,is there any kind of (simple?) script that would be able
    to determine info like cellphone make,type,browser - and then "text" it
    to ?
    Robert Baer, Aug 20, 2013
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:

    > In javascript .....


    It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very good
    reasons should be blocked by the phone.

    --
    Denis McMahon,
    Denis McMahon, Aug 20, 2013
    #2
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  3. Robert Baer wrote:

    > Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    > nothing (filled out correctly):
    > open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    > send(txt)
    >
    > Help?


    <http://jibbering.com/faq/#runServerScript>

    --
    Christoph M. Becker
    Christoph Michael Becker, Aug 20, 2013
    #3
  4. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Denis McMahon wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    >> In javascript .....

    >
    > It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very good
    > reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >

    Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and found
    texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    nothing (filled out correctly):
    open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    send(txt)

    Help?
    Robert Baer, Aug 20, 2013
    #4
  5. On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:

    > Denis McMahon wrote:
    >> On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>
    >>> In javascript .....

    >>
    >> It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very good
    >> reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >>

    > Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and found
    > texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    > I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    > goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    > Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    > nothing (filled out correctly):
    > open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    > send(txt)


    For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.

    A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.

    In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening the
    users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and requiring
    the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm sure that
    there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook [express] that
    allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.

    However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured browser,
    all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    the domain that served the page.

    That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    having the client browser generate and send those mails.

    --
    Denis McMahon,
    Denis McMahon, Aug 21, 2013
    #5
  6. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Christoph Michael Becker wrote:
    > Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    >> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >> send(txt)
    >>
    >> Help?

    >
    > <http://jibbering.com/faq/#runServerScript>
    >

    Link gets nothing (not even a blank page; "document contains no data").
    Even http://www.jibbering.com/ gives this message.
    Something else (that may work)?
    Robert Baer, Aug 21, 2013
    #6
  7. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Denis McMahon wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    >> Denis McMahon wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In javascript .....
    >>>
    >>> It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very good
    >>> reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >>>

    >> Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and found
    >> texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    >> I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    >> goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    >> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >> send(txt)

    >
    > For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    > with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.
    >
    > A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    > arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.
    >
    > In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening the
    > users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and requiring
    > the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm sure that
    > there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook [express] that
    > allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.
    >
    > However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured browser,
    > all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    > the domain that served the page.
    >
    > That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    > and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    > having the client browser generate and send those mails.
    >

    Yea; all of the meager info about XMLHttpRequest objects are requests
    for info and no real working examples.
    The best i could squeeze out was
    open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpsw)
    send(txt)
    which does not work.
    Robert Baer, Aug 21, 2013
    #7
  8. Am 21.08.2013 04:27, schrieb Robert Baer:
    > Christoph Michael Becker wrote:
    >> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>
    >>> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >>> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >>> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >>> send(txt)
    >>>
    >>> Help?

    >>
    >> <http://jibbering.com/faq/#runServerScript>
    >>

    > Link gets nothing (not even a blank page; "document contains no data").
    > Even http://www.jibbering.com/ gives this message.
    > Something else (that may work)?


    The site was available just before I posted the message and is available
    now. As an alternative you may try:

    <http://pointedears.de/scripts/faq/cljs/#runServerScript>

    --
    Christoph M. Becker
    Christoph Michael Becker, Aug 21, 2013
    #8
  9. On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 18:37:27 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:

    > Denis McMahon wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>
    >>> Denis McMahon wrote:
    >>>> On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In javascript .....
    >>>>
    >>>> It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very
    >>>> good reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >>>>
    >>> Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and
    >>> found
    >>> texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    >>> I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    >>> goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    >>> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >>> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >>> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >>> send(txt)

    >>
    >> For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    >> with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.
    >>
    >> A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    >> arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.
    >>
    >> In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening
    >> the users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and
    >> requiring the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm
    >> sure that there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook
    >> [express] that allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.
    >>
    >> However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured
    >> browser,
    >> all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    >> the domain that served the page.
    >>
    >> That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    >> and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    >> having the client browser generate and send those mails.
    >>

    > Yea; all of the meager info about XMLHttpRequest objects are requests
    > for info and no real working examples.
    > The best i could squeeze out was
    > open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpsw) send(txt)
    > which does not work.


    Then you're not looking in the right places.

    If you google sensibly there are many working examples of javascript code
    to make both asynchronous and synchronous XHRs, both using GET and POST
    methods.

    You need to set the request up in the web page javascript, and code the
    appropriate response handling on your server using php, python, ruby or
    whatever your server coding environment is.

    This is beyond the scope of an html newsgroup. I suggest you ask in a
    javascript newsgroup for information about implementing XHRs in
    javascript, and a relevant language forum for your server side
    environment about constructing and sending mail from the data it receives.

    If you don't have the basic competence to search in the right place for
    the help that you need, it's no surprise that you don't find it.

    --
    Denis McMahon,
    Denis McMahon, Aug 21, 2013
    #9
  10. Robert Baer

    Tim Streater Guest

    In article <kv3c88$e54$>,
    Denis McMahon <> wrote:

    > Then you're not looking in the right places.
    >
    > If you google sensibly there are many working examples of javascript code
    > to make both asynchronous and synchronous XHRs, both using GET and POST
    > methods.
    >
    > You need to set the request up in the web page javascript, and code the
    > appropriate response handling on your server using php, python, ruby or
    > whatever your server coding environment is.


    A simple example may be found here:

    <http://www.clothears.org.uk>

    It includes both sides of the conversation.

    --
    Tim

    "That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
    nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted" -- Bill of Rights 1689
    Tim Streater, Aug 21, 2013
    #10
  11. Robert Baer

    JJ Guest

    On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 19:46:13 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    > Denis McMahon wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >> For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    >> with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.
    >>
    >> A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    >> arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.
    >>
    >> In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening the
    >> users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and requiring
    >> the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm sure that
    >> there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook [express] that
    >> allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.
    >>
    >> However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured browser,
    >> all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    >> the domain that served the page.
    >>
    >> That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    >> and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    >> having the client browser generate and send those mails.
    >>

    > You ever hear of Google Analytics (one of many)?


    I heard about it, found and block them a lot.
    What about it?
    JJ, Aug 22, 2013
    #11
  12. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Denis McMahon wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    >> Denis McMahon wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In javascript .....
    >>>
    >>> It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very good
    >>> reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >>>

    >> Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and found
    >> texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    >> I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    >> goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    >> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >> send(txt)

    >
    > For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    > with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.
    >
    > A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    > arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.
    >
    > In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening the
    > users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and requiring
    > the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm sure that
    > there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook [express] that
    > allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.
    >
    > However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured browser,
    > all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    > the domain that served the page.
    >
    > That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    > and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    > having the client browser generate and send those mails.
    >

    You ever hear of Google Analytics (one of many)?
    Robert Baer, Aug 22, 2013
    #12
  13. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Re: Sending derived info to e-mail SOLVED

    Christoph Michael Becker wrote:
    > Am 21.08.2013 04:27, schrieb Robert Baer:
    >> Christoph Michael Becker wrote:
    >>> Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >>>> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >>>> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >>>> send(txt)
    >>>>
    >>>> Help?
    >>>
    >>> <http://jibbering.com/faq/#runServerScript>
    >>>

    >> Link gets nothing (not even a blank page; "document contains no data").
    >> Even http://www.jibbering.com/ gives this message.
    >> Something else (that may work)?

    >
    > The site was available just before I posted the message and is available
    > now. As an alternative you may try:
    >
    > <http://pointedears.de/scripts/faq/cljs/#runServerScript>
    >

    Thanks; the jibbering reference still does not work.
    "Server side script" kills what i had in mind.
    Fortunately, i found a better and easier solution, using
    navigator.userAgent.match against a string list of cellphone browsers
    like iPhone|iPod|BlackBerry etc.
    What was critical was getting that list.
    Robert Baer, Aug 22, 2013
    #13
  14. On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 19:46:13 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:

    > Denis McMahon wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>
    >>> Denis McMahon wrote:
    >>>> On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In javascript .....
    >>>>
    >>>> It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very
    >>>> good reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >>>>
    >>> Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and
    >>> found
    >>> texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    >>> I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    >>> goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    >>> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >>> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >>> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >>> send(txt)

    >>
    >> For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    >> with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.
    >>
    >> A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    >> arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.
    >>
    >> In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening
    >> the users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and
    >> requiring the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm
    >> sure that there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook
    >> [express] that allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.
    >>
    >> However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured
    >> browser,
    >> all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    >> the domain that served the page.
    >>
    >> That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    >> and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    >> having the client browser generate and send those mails.
    >>

    > You ever hear of Google Analytics (one of many)?


    Yes, and GA is subject to the same XSS limitations as anything else
    running in a browser, and in my opinion, any sensibly configured browser
    doesn't talk to GA servers at all.

    I'm just wondering if this is the point at which I should decide you're
    trolling and stop trying to help you, or perhaps if we've already gone
    past that, because you clearly have nfi what you're talking about.

    It sounds to me as if you're looking to us to give you code to do
    something that shouldn't be done (or even doable) in most browsers simply
    based on your inaccurate understanding of a totally different mechanism
    that is used by some websites.

    --
    Denis McMahon,
    Denis McMahon, Aug 22, 2013
    #14
  15. Denis McMahon wrote:
    > On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 19:46:13 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >


    >> You ever hear of Google Analytics (one of many)?

    >
    > Yes, and GA is subject to the same XSS limitations as anything else
    > running in a browser, and in my opinion, any sensibly configured browser
    > doesn't talk to GA servers at all.


    I put one "thumbs up" for Ghostery <http://www.ghostery.com/> Finally
    relief from those damn infomercial popups from the likes of VibrantMedia
    on tech blog and forum pages...

    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
    Jonathan N. Little, Aug 22, 2013
    #15
  16. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Denis McMahon wrote:
    > On Wed, 21 Aug 2013 19:46:13 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    >> Denis McMahon wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 13:43:10 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Denis McMahon wrote:
    >>>>> On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:03 -0800, Robert Baer wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In javascript .....
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It sounds to me as if you're trying to do something that for very
    >>>>> good reasons should be blocked by the phone.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Knew squat about texting; fiddled around with 2 cellphones and
    >>>> found
    >>>> texting,as such,is NOT useful for what i want.
    >>>> I would like to send an internally generated string (eg: txt="blah
    >>>> goofus mish mash") to a given e-mailbox (know username and password).
    >>>> Using a mozilla browser for testing, the following JS code does
    >>>> nothing (filled out correctly):
    >>>> open("POST",url,async,usrname,usrpw)
    >>>> send(txt)
    >>>
    >>> For starters, ideally, a browser should not be communicating any data
    >>> with anyone without the users knowledge and permission.
    >>>
    >>> A web browser certainly shouldn't be sending arbitrary emails to
    >>> arbitrary locations in the background of browsing.
    >>>
    >>> In most web browsers, the only way to send an email involves opening
    >>> the users chosen email client with a preloaded message text, and
    >>> requiring the user to do the final send step. I say most, because I'm
    >>> sure that there must be at least one combination of IE / outlook
    >>> [express] that allows OLE hax to send emails from the browser.
    >>>
    >>> However, generally, in javascript code in a sensibly configured
    >>> browser,
    >>> all you can do "in the background" is make ajax requests to a server in
    >>> the domain that served the page.
    >>>
    >>> That server can then of course convert those ajax requests into mails,
    >>> and send those mails from that server, but that's very different to
    >>> having the client browser generate and send those mails.
    >>>

    >> You ever hear of Google Analytics (one of many)?

    >
    > Yes, and GA is subject to the same XSS limitations as anything else
    > running in a browser, and in my opinion, any sensibly configured browser
    > doesn't talk to GA servers at all.
    >
    > I'm just wondering if this is the point at which I should decide you're
    > trolling and stop trying to help you, or perhaps if we've already gone
    > past that, because you clearly have nfi what you're talking about.
    >
    > It sounds to me as if you're looking to us to give you code to do
    > something that shouldn't be done (or even doable) in most browsers simply
    > based on your inaccurate understanding of a totally different mechanism
    > that is used by some websites.
    >

    As i mentioned,"gone past that" and solved the problem rather nicely
    and painlessly.
    Thanks for the help.
    BTW,it is not the browser "sensibly configured" or otherwise, that
    talks to GA and their ilk..
    Robert Baer, Aug 23, 2013
    #16
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