Serialization file getting bigger and bigger on the same object

Discussion in 'Java' started by yancheng.cheok@gmail.com, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Guest

    In my application, I perform serialization on my JTable's TableModel.
    I realize that, even I didn't make any modification (either save or
    delete data) on the JTable content, however, everytime I save the
    JTable's TableModel, the serialization file will getting bigger and
    bigger (about 2KB)

    It works this way

    1. I shut down my application. My application save JTable's TableModel
    to serialization file. The file size is 50 KB

    2. I open up my application. My application load JTable's TableModel.
    Everything in the JTable content restore.

    3. I shut down my application again, without modification on the
    JTable's TableModel. The file size is 52 KB.

    4. If I keep repeating step 1, the file size will keep increase.

    May I know how I can prevent my serialization file from getting bigger
    and bigger?

    Thanks


    --------code----------
    /*
    * NewJFrame.java
    *
    * Created on April 8, 2007, 11:40 PM
    */

    import java.io.*;
    import javax.swing.table.*;

    /**
    *
    * @author doraemon
    */
    public class NewJFrame extends javax.swing.JFrame {

    /** Creates new form NewJFrame */
    public NewJFrame() {
    initComponents();

    loadTableModel();
    }

    /** This method is called from within the constructor to
    * initialize the form.
    * WARNING: Do NOT modify this code. The content of this method is
    * always regenerated by the Form Editor.
    */
    // <editor-fold defaultstate="collapsed" desc=" Generated Code
    ">
    private void initComponents() {
    jScrollPane1 = new javax.swing.JScrollPane();
    jTable1 = new javax.swing.JTable();


    setDefaultCloseOperation(javax.swing.WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
    addWindowListener(new java.awt.event.WindowAdapter() {
    public void windowClosed(java.awt.event.WindowEvent evt) {
    formWindowClosed(evt);
    }
    });

    jTable1.setModel(new javax.swing.table.DefaultTableModel(
    new Object [][] {
    {null, null, null, null},
    {null, null, null, null},
    {null, null, null, null},
    {null, null, null, null}
    },
    new String [] {
    "Title 1", "Title 2", "Title 3", "Title 4"
    }
    ));
    jScrollPane1.setViewportView(jTable1);

    javax.swing.GroupLayout layout = new
    javax.swing.GroupLayout(getContentPane());
    getContentPane().setLayout(layout);
    layout.setHorizontalGroup(

    layout.createParallelGroup(javax.swing.GroupLayout.Alignment.LEADING)
    .addGroup(layout.createSequentialGroup()
    .addContainerGap()
    .addComponent(jScrollPane1,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE, 375,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE)
    .addContainerGap(15, Short.MAX_VALUE))
    );
    layout.setVerticalGroup(

    layout.createParallelGroup(javax.swing.GroupLayout.Alignment.LEADING)
    .addGroup(layout.createSequentialGroup()
    .addComponent(jScrollPane1,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE, 275,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE)
    .addContainerGap(25, Short.MAX_VALUE))
    );
    pack();
    }// </editor-fold>

    private void formWindowClosed(java.awt.event.WindowEvent evt)
    {
    // TODO add your handling code here:
    saveTableModel();
    System.out.println("table model saved");
    }

    private boolean saveTableModel() {
    try {
    FileOutputStream fos = new
    FileOutputStream("table.ser");
    ObjectOutputStream out = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
    out.writeObject(jTable1.getModel());
    out.close();
    }
    catch(IOException exp) {
    exp.printStackTrace();
    return false;
    }

    return true;
    }

    private boolean loadTableModel() {
    TableModel tableModel = null;

    try {
    FileInputStream fos = new FileInputStream("table.ser");
    ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(fos);
    tableModel = (TableModel)in.readObject();
    in.close();
    }
    catch(IOException exp) {
    exp.printStackTrace();
    return false;
    }
    catch(ClassNotFoundException exp) {
    exp.printStackTrace();
    return false;
    }

    if(tableModel != null)
    jTable1.setModel(tableModel);

    return true;
    }

    /**
    * @param args the command line arguments
    */
    public static void main(String args[]) {
    java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
    new NewJFrame().setVisible(true);
    }
    });
    }

    // Variables declaration - do not modify
    private javax.swing.JScrollPane jScrollPane1;
    private javax.swing.JTable jTable1;
    // End of variables declaration

    }
     
    , Apr 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. wrote:
    >In my application, I perform serialization on my JTable's TableModel.


    I ran your program as you posted it, and noted
    the same effect you report, file size increasing
    from an initial 8Kb, to 9.5, then 11.

    Looking in the ser file, I noted a lot of cruft gets
    serialised as well, so decided to try a run just
    serializing the data.*

    The size dropped to around 290-310 bytes (including
    4 smallish values in the table data), but was still a little
    'indefinite'.

    Why not use XMLEncoder/Decoder instead?
    The advantages are twofold.
    - Serialization might well fail between class changes
    (read as J2SE upgrades) - it is fragile.
    - The XMLEncoder is optimized to store only what is
    necessary, and will probably lead to a more predictable
    file size.

    * In any case, here is my variant that focuses on the
    table data itself..

    <sscce>
    /*
    * NewJFrame.java
    *
    * Created on April 8, 2007, 11:40 PM
    */

    import java.io.*;
    import javax.swing.table.*;
    import java.util.Vector;

    public class NewJFrame extends javax.swing.JFrame {

    Vector columnIdents;

    /** Creates new form NewJFrame */
    public NewJFrame() {
    initComponents();

    loadTableModel();
    }

    /** This method is called from within the constructor to
    * initialize the form.
    * WARNING: Do NOT modify this code. The content of this method is
    * always regenerated by the Form Editor.
    */
    // <editor-fold defaultstate="collapsed" desc=" Generated Code">
    private void initComponents() {
    jScrollPane1 = new javax.swing.JScrollPane();
    jTable1 = new javax.swing.JTable();
    columnIdents = new Vector();
    for (int ii=1; ii<5; ii++) {
    columnIdents.addElement(
    new String("Title " + (ii)));
    }
    Vector data = new Vector();
    for (int ii=1; ii<5; ii++) {
    data.add( new Vector(4) );
    }

    setDefaultCloseOperation(javax.swing.WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
    addWindowListener(new java.awt.event.WindowAdapter() {
    public void windowClosed(java.awt.event.WindowEvent evt) {
    formWindowClosed(evt);
    }
    });

    jTable1.setModel(new javax.swing.table.DefaultTableModel(
    data, columnIdents
    ));
    jScrollPane1.setViewportView(jTable1);

    javax.swing.GroupLayout layout = new
    javax.swing.GroupLayout(getContentPane());
    getContentPane().setLayout(layout);
    layout.setHorizontalGroup(

    layout.createParallelGroup(javax.swing.GroupLayout.Alignment.LEADING)
    .addGroup(layout.createSequentialGroup()
    .addContainerGap()
    .addComponent(jScrollPane1,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE, 375,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE)
    .addContainerGap(15, Short.MAX_VALUE))
    );
    layout.setVerticalGroup(

    layout.createParallelGroup(javax.swing.GroupLayout.Alignment.LEADING)
    .addGroup(layout.createSequentialGroup()
    .addComponent(jScrollPane1,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE, 275,
    javax.swing.GroupLayout.PREFERRED_SIZE)
    .addContainerGap(25, Short.MAX_VALUE))
    );
    pack();
    }// </editor-fold>

    private void formWindowClosed(java.awt.event.WindowEvent evt)
    {
    // TODO add your handling code here:
    saveTableModel();
    System.out.println("table model saved");
    }

    private boolean saveTableModel() {
    try {
    FileOutputStream fos = new
    FileOutputStream("table.ser", false);
    ObjectOutputStream out = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
    out.writeObject(((DefaultTableModel)jTable1.
    getModel()).getDataVector());
    out.close();
    }
    catch(IOException exp) {
    exp.printStackTrace();
    return false;
    }

    return true;
    }

    private boolean loadTableModel() {
    //TableModel tableModel = null;
    Vector data = null;

    try {
    FileInputStream fos = new FileInputStream("table.ser");
    ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(fos);
    //tableModel = (TableModel)in.readObject();
    data = (Vector)in.readObject();
    in.close();
    }
    catch(IOException exp) {
    exp.printStackTrace();
    return false;
    }
    catch(ClassNotFoundException exp) {
    exp.printStackTrace();
    return false;
    }

    //if(tableModel != null)
    if(data != null) {
    ((DefaultTableModel)jTable1.getModel()).
    setDataVector(data, columnIdents);
    }

    return true;
    }

    /**
    * @param args the command line arguments
    */
    public static void main(String args[]) {
    java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
    new NewJFrame().setVisible(true);
    }
    });
    }

    // Variables declaration - do not modify
    private javax.swing.JScrollPane jScrollPane1;
    private javax.swing.JTable jTable1;
    // End of variables declaration

    }
    </sscce>

    HTH

    --
    Andrew Thompson
    http://www.athompson.info/andrew/

    Message posted via JavaKB.com
    http://www.javakb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/java-general/200704/1
     
    Andrew Thompson, Apr 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. Filip Larsen Guest

    wrote:

    > In my application, I perform serialization on my JTable's TableModel.
    > I realize that, even I didn't make any modification (either save or
    > delete data) on the JTable content, however, everytime I save the
    > JTable's TableModel, the serialization file will getting bigger and
    > bigger (about 2KB)


    DefaultTableModel extends AbstractTableModel and this class serializes
    all listeners that implement Serializable. Since JTable register itself
    as a listener with its table model, you are actually serializing the
    whole JTable instance along with the table model. When data is
    deserialized back in, the old JTable instance will just "sit" inactive
    in the listener list of the table model and next time you serialize the
    table model you will now get 2 JTable instances written out. And so on.

    The fittest work-around seems to be what Andrew did, namely to serialize
    only the vector data of the table model.


    Regards,
    --
    Filip Larsen
     
    Filip Larsen, Apr 10, 2007
    #3
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