should I study C or C++ or Java or Visual Basic?

Discussion in 'C++' started by grappletech, Nov 22, 2006.

  1. grappletech

    grappletech Guest

    I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    The syntax is different. I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    money's tight. Any recommendations?

    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
     
    grappletech, Nov 22, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. grappletech

    Ondra Holub Guest

    grappletech napsal:
    > I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    > decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    > and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    > more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    > but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    > The syntax is different. I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    > money's tight. Any recommendations?
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----


    You can get many free compilers for various platforms (for example Gnu
    C/C++ is available for almost any platform). You can find many of them
    at http://www.thefreecountry.com/compilers/cpp.shtml

    Question "C or C++ or Java or Visual Basic?" is not good for C++ forum.
    The answer is of course C++. You can ask on java forum and you'll get
    answer java, etc. I (personaly) would recommend C++ or java. C is also
    good. But definitely not Visual Basic (no flame - it is just my
    personal opinion).
     
    Ondra Holub, Nov 22, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. grappletech wrote:
    > Any recommendations?


    Try a search engine.
    Such questions were posted thousands of times already.
     
    Mathias Gaunard, Nov 22, 2006
    #3
  4. grappletech:

    > I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses
    > about a decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode,
    > algorithms, and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should
    > perhaps learn a more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a
    > "Beginning C" book, but the C programs won't compile in the free
    > compilers I have downloaded. The syntax is different. I guess I have
    > to buy a programming package, but money's tight. Any recommendations?



    C++, it's the Swiss army knife of programming languages.

    --

    Frederick Gotham
     
    Frederick Gotham, Nov 22, 2006
    #4
  5. grappletech

    Daniel T. Guest

    grappletech <> wrote:

    > I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    > decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    > and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    > more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    > but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    > The syntax is different. I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    > money's tight. Any recommendations?


    Yes. You should also study SmallTalk, Python, and Ruby. As well as
    Scheme, Lisp, CLOS, Eiffel, and Ada.

    --
    To send me email, put "sheltie" in the subject.
     
    Daniel T., Nov 22, 2006
    #5
  6. grappletech

    Guest

    [...]
    > Yes. You should also study SmallTalk, Python, and Ruby. As well as
    > Scheme, Lisp, CLOS, Eiffel, and Ada.

    I'd look at ASM :)
    >
     
    , Nov 22, 2006
    #6
  7. grappletech

    Alan Guest

    Alan, Nov 22, 2006
    #7
  8. Daniel T. wrote:

    > Yes. You should also study SmallTalk, Python, and Ruby. As well as
    > Scheme, Lisp, CLOS, Eiffel, and Ada.


    There are a lot of languages that could be removed, either because they
    are redundant or obsolete.
    On the other hand, there is no representative of the ML family.
     
    Mathias Gaunard, Nov 22, 2006
    #8
  9. [Followups set to acclcc++]

    grappletech said:

    > I got a "Beginning C"
    > book, but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have
    > downloaded.


    C is C. Sounds like you got a lousy book, so the solution is to get a better
    book. "The C Programming Language", 2nd edition, by Kernighan and Ritchie,
    is the definitive guide to C, and worth every penny. (Dennis Ritchie is the
    creator of the C language.)

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
     
    Richard Heathfield, Nov 22, 2006
    #9
  10. grappletech

    Mark P Guest

    Alan wrote:
    > DevC++ is a good, free development environment:
    > http://www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html, along with Dialog Designer for
    > wxWidgets: http://wxdsgn.sourceforge.net/.
    >
    > Alan
    >


    Get Code::Blocks instead. AFAIK, Dev-C++ is no longer being developed
    and Code::Blocks is its moral successor.

    Incidentally, I think Visual Studio Express by Microsoft is even better,
    and it's also free.
     
    Mark P, Nov 22, 2006
    #10
  11. "Mathias Gaunard" <> wrote in message
    news:4564cee3$0$20301$...
    > Daniel T. wrote:
    >
    >> Yes. You should also study SmallTalk, Python, and Ruby. As well as
    >> Scheme, Lisp, CLOS, Eiffel, and Ada.

    >
    > There are a lot of languages that could be removed, either because they
    > are redundant or obsolete.
    > On the other hand, there is no representative of the ML family.


    In that case I recommend Objective CAML. Obviously partly because it just
    sounds funny :)
     
    Stuart Golodetz, Nov 22, 2006
    #11
  12. grappletech

    Daniel T. Guest

    Mathias Gaunard <> wrote:

    > Daniel T. wrote:
    >
    > > Yes. You should also study SmallTalk, Python, and Ruby. As well as
    > > Scheme, Lisp, CLOS, Eiffel, and Ada.

    >
    > There are a lot of languages that could be removed, either because they
    > are redundant or obsolete.


    Ah, but they are still worthy of study.

    > On the other hand, there is no representative of the ML family.


    Damn I knew I missed a few. Here are over 1000 languages, all worthy of
    study:
    http://99-bottles-of-beer.net/abc.html

    --
    To send me email, put "sheltie" in the subject.
     
    Daniel T., Nov 23, 2006
    #12
  13. grappletech

    Guest

    On Nov 22, 9:34 pm, grappletech <> wrote:
    > I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    > decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    > and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    > more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    > but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    > The syntax is different. I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    > money's tight. Any recommendations?


    If I were you I'd studdy C++, C is also good but it does not have any
    OO which is good to know these days. The reason you should go for C++
    is that it allows you to do very low-level stuff and program at a very
    abstract level. The low-level stuff is good since it teaches you how a
    computer and programs work, which is a very good thing. The abstract
    thing is good since that's how you should program mostly (there are
    exceptions of course). If you are quite good at C++ you'll be quite
    good at most languages (except functional ones), the same can not
    always be said the other way around.

    If you are running on windows I'd recommend trying Visual C++ Express,
    a very good environment.

    --
    Erik Wikström
     
    , Nov 23, 2006
    #13
  14. Visual Basic 6.0 is the undisputed GOD of programming languages. It
    allows for very rapid development times. Don't go for VB.NET as the
    newer versions are really a bit of a step backwards and do not offer
    the same development speed. Most of the "post vb 6.0" versions are a
    bit unstable as well. VB 6.0 remained the same for 8 years, so it has
    no bugs like the newer flaky version.

    Hope this helps
    The Grand Master


    grappletech wrote:
    > I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    > decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    > and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    > more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    > but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    > The syntax is different. I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    > money's tight. Any recommendations?
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
     
    Master Programmer, Nov 23, 2006
    #14
  15. Master Programmer said:

    > Visual Basic 6.0 is the undisputed GOD of programming languages.


    I dispute that.

    --
    Richard Heathfield
    "Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
    http://www.cpax.org.uk
    email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
     
    Richard Heathfield, Nov 23, 2006
    #15
  16. grappletech

    Geo Guest

    Master Programmer wrote:
    > Visual Basic 6.0 is the undisputed GOD of programming languages.


    You are one funny guy, I nearly fell of my chair laughing....
     
    Geo, Nov 23, 2006
    #16

  17. > Visual Basic 6.0 is the undisputed GOD of programming languages.

    ....
    > The Grand Master


    Enough said.
     
    Gernot Frisch, Nov 23, 2006
    #17
  18. grappletech

    kwikius Guest

    Gernot Frisch wrote:
    > > Visual Basic 6.0 is the undisputed GOD of programming languages.

    > ...
    > > The Grand Master

    >
    > Enough said.


    Yeah but what's he a "Grand Master" of? He certainly seems to be a
    Troll, but I don't think he is much of a master at trolling as his
    posts to now aint't been sophisticated enough IMO, That also means he
    can't be a Grand Master of everything. Now maybe he is a Grand Master
    BASIC programmer, but in that case why isnt he on some Basic newsgroup
    expounding his pearls of wisdom to his apprentices? He certainly don't
    seem to have much detail on programming as such, but then I suppose
    once you reach such a high level, everything is nothing and nothing is
    everything and all that mumbo jumbo. Maybe when you reach the lonely
    mountain peaks of programming you turn to Visual Basic as some sort of
    "retro programming chic"challenge?.

    I guess thats the power of being a Grand master. You can speak what
    seems to me be absolute crap, but which is in fact incredibly profound,
    except no one understands it, unless they too are a Grand Master. Thats
    a lonely position to be in, but this could explain why he's here.
    Perhaps its only that on comp.lang.c++ where enough Grand Master
    programmers exist, where that programming depth, knowledge and
    experience exist, that there is some hope that here someone might
    understand? I guess maybe the loneliness of greatness in the world of
    VB has become too much to bear?

    regards
    Andy Little
     
    kwikius, Nov 23, 2006
    #18
  19. grappletech

    rossum Guest

    On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 14:34:00 -0600, grappletech
    <> wrote:

    >I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    >decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    >and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    >more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    >but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    >The syntax is different. I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    >money's tight. Any recommendations?
    >
    >----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    >http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    >----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----

    What do you want to do and what are you doing it on?

    If you want to write programs with a Windows/GUI interface then I
    would suggest a language that comes with a standard GUI API built in -
    VB, Java, C# or similar. If you just want to write console programs
    (green on black text only) then languages without a standard GUI API
    will also be possible - C, C++. GUI APIs are available for both, but
    they are not standard.

    If you are on Linux then Java is probably a good choice; C# and VB are
    only really options if you are working on Windows. C and C++ are
    available for both platforms. I do not know what is available for the
    Mac, probably C, C++ and Java.

    C is a lower level language than Pascal or BASIC. C++ has the kitchen
    sink and everything thrown in, it can be low level, high level or
    anything in between. It has a steep learing curve because it is so
    large. Having also started with BASIC and Pascal (and Algol 60!) I
    would think that Java (Linux or Windows) or C# (Windows) would be the
    best to start with. VB would probably be a step backwards from Java
    or C#, and since you already know some BASIC it would be good to learn
    a different language.

    Once you have picked up one language it is easy to pick up others.

    rossum
     
    rossum, Nov 23, 2006
    #19
  20. In article <>, grappletech
    <> writes
    >I took Pascal and BASIC in a couple of beginner programming courses about a
    >decade ago and did well with them. I am good with pseudocode, algorithms,
    >and the mathematics of programming. I decided I should perhaps learn a
    >more powerful language to program my own apps. I got a "Beginning C" book,
    >but the C programs won't compile in the free compilers I have downloaded.
    >The syntax is different.


    Then you have either a badly broken book (very likely as the majority
    are) or a broken compiler (much less likely). Quincy + GCC or MinGW with
    MinGWStudio both work fine as C compilers as do several others.

    > I guess I have to buy a programming package, but
    >money's tight. Any recommendations?


    Absolutely unnecessary but tell us which book you are using and give us
    an example of code from the book that fails to compile.


    --
    Francis Glassborow ACCU
    Author of 'You Can Do It!' and "You Can Program in C++"
    see http://www.spellen.org/youcandoit
    For project ideas and contributions: http://www.spellen.org/youcandoit/projects
     
    Francis Glassborow, Nov 23, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. M P
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    558
    Joe Fallon
    Aug 7, 2004
  2. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    342
  3. opistobranchia
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    387
    Earl Purple
    Aug 15, 2005
  4. consultant
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    391
    Consultant
    May 18, 2007
  5. Boris Du¹ek
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    380
    Juha Nieminen
    May 2, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page