Slashdot and C

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by pemo, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. pemo

    pemo Guest

    Article here:

    http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/07/18/0146216

    "When C was created, it was very fast because it was almost trivial to turn
    C code into equivalent machine code. But this was only a short-term benefit;
    in the 30 years since C was created, processors have changed a lot. The task
    of mapping C code to a modern microprocessor has gradually become
    increasingly difficult. Since a lot of legacy C code is still around,
    however, a huge amount of research effort (and money) has been applied to
    the problem, so we still can get good performance from the language."

    --
    ==============
    Not a pedant
    ==============
     
    pemo, Jul 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. pemo

    Tom St Denis Guest

    pemo wrote:
    > Article here:
    >
    > http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/07/18/0146216
    >
    > "When C was created, it was very fast because it was almost trivial to turn
    > C code into equivalent machine code. But this was only a short-term benefit;
    > in the 30 years since C was created, processors have changed a lot. The task
    > of mapping C code to a modern microprocessor has gradually become
    > increasingly difficult. Since a lot of legacy C code is still around,
    > however, a huge amount of research effort (and money) has been applied to
    > the problem, so we still can get good performance from the language."


    I don't get the conclusion [if any]. Companies like Sun and IBM pour
    millions of dollars into optimizing their JVM. Similarly with
    Microsoft and their C#.

    Companies like PGI spend a fortune on their optimizing Fortran
    compilers, etc, etc, etc.

    If the conclusion is that C is outdated and optimizing for it is too
    costly, the author is just plain ignorant and needs a return to
    reality.

    Tom
     
    Tom St Denis, Jul 19, 2006
    #2
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