Slightly OT. Date order

Discussion in 'HTML' started by James Hutton, Apr 3, 2007.

  1. James Hutton

    James Hutton Guest

    I'm preparing a page regarding the Falklands Conflict, giving a day by
    day account of events, with links to videos and archive material from
    the time. Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest
    at the bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page. I did
    this so that regular visitors wouldn't have to scroll down each visit.
    Although on one level this seems the most "intuitive" I wonder what
    other people would do?

    James
     
    James Hutton, Apr 3, 2007
    #1
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  2. James Hutton

    Mike Minor Guest

    "James Hutton" <> wrote in message
    news:euttrb$qte$...
    > I'm preparing a page regarding the Falklands Conflict, giving a day by day
    > account of events, with links to videos and archive material from the
    > time. Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest at the
    > bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page. I did this so
    > that regular visitors wouldn't have to scroll down each visit. Although on
    > one level this seems the most "intuitive" I wonder what other people would
    > do?
    >
    > James


    As a bit of a history buff, I would prefer to see events in chronological
    order, but that's just me. I would also be interested in looking at your
    site when it's done.

    "Stupid" Mike
     
    Mike Minor, Apr 3, 2007
    #2
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  3. James Hutton

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 3 Apr, 17:02, James Hutton <>
    wrote:

    > Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest
    > at the bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page.


    Chronological is the best choice for order.

    Reverse chronological is only useful because it reduces the navigation
    distance for the most interesting item, i.e. the most-recent is
    already at the top of the page. This benefit only applies if "latest"
    is of significantly more interest than the others, i.e. it supercedes
    the others (warnings) or is probably of more immediate interest
    (emails).

    Any time you're looking at a sequence of _multiple_ items, stick with
    forward chronology.
     
    Andy Dingley, Apr 3, 2007
    #3
  4. James Hutton

    James Hutton Guest

    Mike Minor wrote:
    > "James Hutton" <> wrote in message
    > news:euttrb$qte$...
    >> I'm preparing a page regarding the Falklands Conflict, giving a day by day
    >> account of events, with links to videos and archive material from the
    >> time. Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest at the
    >> bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page. I did this so
    >> that regular visitors wouldn't have to scroll down each visit. Although on
    >> one level this seems the most "intuitive" I wonder what other people would
    >> do?
    >>
    >> James

    >
    > As a bit of a history buff, I would prefer to see events in chronological
    > order, but that's just me. I would also be interested in looking at your
    > site when it's done.
    >
    > "Stupid" Mike
    >
    >

    Mike,

    Still WIP (but being worked on, working nights, kids, wife and beer
    permitting!)

    http::/www.rna-10-area.net/falklands.html

    With over 100 days etc still to do, a rewrite will be a major
    undertaking, but I'm always open to suggestions.

    James
     
    James Hutton, Apr 3, 2007
    #4
  5. James Hutton

    Mike Minor Guest


    > Mike,
    >
    > Still WIP (but being worked on, working nights, kids, wife and beer
    > permitting!)
    >
    > http::/www.rna-10-area.net/falklands.html
    >
    > With over 100 days etc still to do, a rewrite will be a major undertaking,
    > but I'm always open to suggestions.
    >
    > James


    Very nice start you have there. I can remember following the progress of the
    conflict in the news back then. It's always intersting to review events like
    these to see how they compare to what's happening in the world today.

    As for the layout, with the exception of putting the events in chronological
    order, it's appearance is very nice.

    Mike
     
    Mike Minor, Apr 3, 2007
    #5
  6. While the city slept, James Hutton ()
    feverishly typed...

    > I'm preparing a page regarding the Falklands Conflict, giving a day by
    > day account of events, with links to videos and archive material from
    > the time.


    Sounds like an interesting project.

    > Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the
    > oldest at the bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the
    > page. I did this so that regular visitors wouldn't have to scroll
    > down each visit. Although on one level this seems the most
    > "intuitive" I wonder what other people would do?


    How "On This Day" at the top, followed by a forwards chronological list,
    maybe "The Events Leading Up To This Day..."?

    Just my twopenn'orth

    Cheers,
    Nige

    --
    Nigel Moss http://www.nigenet.org.uk
    Mail address will bounce. | Take the DOG. out!
    "Your mother ate my dog!", "Not all of him!"
     
    nice.guy.nige, Apr 3, 2007
    #6
  7. James Hutton

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    "Andy Dingley" <> wrote:

    > On 3 Apr, 17:02, James Hutton <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest
    > > at the bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page.

    >
    > Chronological is the best choice for order.
    >
    > Reverse chronological ... benefit only applies if "latest"
    > is of significantly more interest than the others, i.e. it supercedes
    > the others (warnings) or is probably of more immediate interest
    > (emails).
    >
    > Any time you're looking at a sequence of _multiple_ items, stick with
    > forward chronology.


    There is a third way, generally speaking, (OP's context might
    need to be either one way or another and not this third?). In
    some pages, eg. a page with a directory of newletters over a
    number of years for some organization, it is useful to put the
    listing link of the most recent at the top and then the rest,
    including a repeat of the latest, in chronological order below.
    This is an ideal context for this, but the idea can be used for
    other less clear cut ones. If unsure, do it along these lines, as
    it is likely to be more advantageous than not.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Apr 3, 2007
    #7
  8. James Hutton

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <iqwQh.19188$>,
    "Mike Minor" <> wrote:

    >
    > > Mike,
    > >
    > > Still WIP (but being worked on, working nights, kids, wife and beer
    > > permitting!)
    > >
    > > http::/www.rna-10-area.net/falklands.html
    > >
    > > With over 100 days etc still to do, a rewrite will be a major undertaking,
    > > but I'm always open to suggestions.
    > >
    > > James

    >
    > Very nice start you have there.


    A couple of things, a little more space is needed between the
    list markers and the text in the list items in the left
    navigation pane. And I'd say to remove the W3C logos eventually,
    these don't have much to do with the material. Imagine a book in
    which there were "professional accreditation" logos on each page
    and you will see what is not quite right with the idea.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Apr 3, 2007
    #8
  9. James Hutton wrote:

    > Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest
    > at the bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page. I did
    > this so that regular visitors wouldn't have to scroll down each visit.
    > Although on one level this seems the most "intuitive" I wonder what
    > other people would do?


    Ah, there's the rub. Certainly most blogs and such have their newest
    material at the top, so that it what people are probably most used to.

    However, there are a fre blogs that I read very frequently -- so if I want
    to read the articles in date order, I need to skim down the page to find
    the last article I read on my previous visit, then scroll up the page to
    get to each new article. If one particular article is fairly long, then
    I'll need to scroll down slightly to read to the end of it. So
    oldest-first certainly has its advantages too, and that's what most
    web-based forums use, so people shouldn't find that too confusing either.

    Whichever way you choose, I'd suggest including an RSS or Atom feed of
    your articles. That way, if people read your site regularly, and don't
    like the order you've chosen, they can use their feed reader to present
    the articles in a different order.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
    Geek of ~ HTML/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python*/Apache/Linux

    * = I'm getting there!
     
    Toby A Inkster, Apr 4, 2007
    #9
  10. James Hutton

    James Hutton Guest

    Toby A Inkster wrote:
    > James Hutton wrote:
    >
    >> Currently I've got the dates in reverse order, ie, the oldest
    >> at the bottom of the page and the latest at the top of the page. I did
    >> this so that regular visitors wouldn't have to scroll down each visit.
    >> Although on one level this seems the most "intuitive" I wonder what
    >> other people would do?

    >
    > Ah, there's the rub. Certainly most blogs and such have their newest
    > material at the top, so that it what people are probably most used to.
    >
    > However, there are a fre blogs that I read very frequently -- so if I want
    > to read the articles in date order, I need to skim down the page to find
    > the last article I read on my previous visit, then scroll up the page to
    > get to each new article. If one particular article is fairly long, then
    > I'll need to scroll down slightly to read to the end of it. So
    > oldest-first certainly has its advantages too, and that's what most
    > web-based forums use, so people shouldn't find that too confusing either.
    >
    > Whichever way you choose, I'd suggest including an RSS or Atom feed of
    > your articles. That way, if people read your site regularly, and don't
    > like the order you've chosen, they can use their feed reader to present
    > the articles in a different order.
    >

    Toby, hadn't thought of an RSS feed, but that will have to wait until
    I've had some sleep! Night shifts play hell, especially in the fine weather!

    James
     
    James Hutton, Apr 4, 2007
    #10
  11. James Hutton wrote:

    > Night shifts play hell, especially in the fine weather!


    Indeed -- my other half's a doctor, and has just spent 4 months working in
    an A&E dept; night shifts a-plenty.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
    Geek of ~ HTML/SQL/Perl/PHP/Python*/Apache/Linux

    * = I'm getting there!
     
    Toby A Inkster, Apr 4, 2007
    #11
  12. James Hutton

    Mike Minor Guest

    >
    > However, there are a fre blogs that I read very frequently -- so if I want
    > to read the articles in date order, I need to skim down the page to find
    > the last article I read on my previous visit, then scroll up the page to
    > get to each new article. If one particular article is fairly long, then
    > I'll need to scroll down slightly to read to the end of it. So
    > oldest-first certainly has its advantages too, and that's what most
    > web-based forums use, so people shouldn't find that too confusing either.
    >


    I agree with you on this point. But isn't that same as "top posting"? I
    thought that was a major no-no. In blogs and such, I too would rather see
    the most recent response at the top, especially if I've been following the
    posts. I see it as a waste of time to have to scroll down to see what, if
    anything, has been posted since I last looked at it.

    "Stupid" Mike
     
    Mike Minor, Apr 4, 2007
    #12
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