software for beginners

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by cirutech, Feb 20, 2008.

  1. cirutech

    cirutech Guest

    Hi everybody,
    I am approaching to FPGA design for university, and I will use
    Altera's devices.
    I have already downloaded Quartus II but now, to begin understand VHDL
    syntax, I would like to find a software which allows me to try little
    pieces of VHDL code, compile it and see it synthetized in logic gates.

    Quartus II seems ok for big projects, but not for learning examples.

    anybody has any tip?

    thanks since now,

    C.
     
    cirutech, Feb 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. cirutech wrote:

    > I am approaching to FPGA design for university, and I will use
    > Altera's devices.
    > I have already downloaded Quartus II but now, to begin understand VHDL
    > syntax, I would like to find a software which allows me to try little
    > pieces of VHDL code, compile it and see it synthetized in logic gates.
    >
    > Quartus II seems ok for big projects, but not for learning examples.
    >
    > anybody has any tip?


    See the reference design here
    http://home.comcast.net/~mike_treseler/
     
    Mike Treseler, Feb 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. FPGA design tools won't synthesis into "gates", but into the FPGA's
    basic units. Typically, these are some variant of a tiny ROM followed by
    a flipflop.
    What gets synthesised is the ROM content plus the interconnect.

    cirutech wrote:
    > Hi everybody,
    > I am approaching to FPGA design for university, and I will use
    > Altera's devices.
    > I have already downloaded Quartus II but now, to begin understand VHDL
    > syntax, I would like to find a software which allows me to try little
    > pieces of VHDL code, compile it and see it synthetized in logic gates.
    >
    > Quartus II seems ok for big projects, but not for learning examples.
    >
    > anybody has any tip?
    >
    > thanks since now,
    >
    > C.
    > From - Thu
     
    David R Brooks, Feb 20, 2008
    #3
  4. cirutech

    Tricky Guest

    Im not sure if the licence you have supports it, but try using the RTL
    viewer in Quartus (Tools->netlist viewers->RTL view). This should show
    you your design in gates and registers. It should also work fine for
    small test builds aswell (It will quite happily make a design using
    just 1 register and a couple of gates). I like to use it to see how
    quartus will synthesize certain bits of VHDL. You dont need to do a
    full compile to get to this stage, just run "Start Analysis and
    Synthesis", That will give you access to the RTL view, and the
    technology map viewer if you're interested to see how it would be
    implemented on the FPGA at the Lut/register level.

    My advice is just set up a project with a single file that you will
    test your code in, and just change it and re-compile it. You may want
    to copy and paste the code somewhere else if you want to keep it.
     
    Tricky, Feb 21, 2008
    #4
  5. cirutech

    cerocca Guest

    Thanks everybody for the answers.
    I think I'll keep working with Quartus II so to optimize also my
    learning of this software, even if it's not so easy at the beginning..

    all the best,

    C

    On Feb 21, 1:37 am, Tricky <> wrote:
    > Im not sure if the licence you have supports it, but try using the RTL
    > viewer in Quartus (Tools->netlist viewers->RTL view). This should show
    > you your design in gates and registers. It should also work fine for
    > small test builds aswell (It will quite happily make a design using
    > just 1 register and a couple of gates). I like to use it to see how
    > quartus will synthesize certain bits of VHDL. You dont need to do a
    > full compile to get to this stage, just run "Start Analysis and
    > Synthesis", That will give you access to the RTL view, and the
    > technology map viewer if you're interested to see how it would be
    > implemented on the FPGA at the Lut/register level.
    >
    > My advice is just set up a project with a single file that you will
    > test your code in, and just change it and re-compile it. You may want
    > to copy and paste the code somewhere else if you want to keep it.
     
    cerocca, Feb 21, 2008
    #5
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