Something Strange From the Days Way Before C++

Discussion in 'C++' started by jstfrths, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. jstfrths

    jstfrths Guest

    Although most computer programmers are men, the very first programmer
    was a woman, Lady Augusta Ada Lovelace. Her mechanical computer, called
    an " analytical machine" was created by Charles Babbage and used punch
    cards for input. The year was 1852 - from
    www.intellectual-playground.com
     
    jstfrths, Jan 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. * jstfrths:
    > Although most computer programmers are men, the very first programmer
    > was a woman, Lady Augusta Ada Lovelace. Her mechanical computer, called
    > an " analytical machine" was created by Charles Babbage and used punch
    > cards for input. The year was 1852 - from
    > www.intellectual-playground.com


    This is not strange at all. The first high level language was created
    by a woman, and the first bug introduced and found by a woman, the same
    one, incidentally. And we'd probably not have the atom bomb (as early
    as we did, anyway) except for the work of a woman. It's a reciprocal
    relationship between men and women. We men enjoy (along with the women)
    the first creative moments of procreation, but then leave it to the
    women to do the hard work; in other more intellectual areas, women
    enjoy (along with the men) doing the first and enabling creative work,
    and then leave it to the men to flesh out the technology.

    Ah, did I start an off-topic flame war now?

    If not, I've probably lost my old skills, or else no women/girls are
    reading my articles in [comp.lang.c++].

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Jan 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. Alf P. Steinbach wrote:

    > This is not strange at all. The first high level language was created
    > by a woman, and the first bug introduced and found by a woman, the same


    And without using a debugger or an IDE... even without a computer.

    --
    Salu2
     
    =?ISO-8859-15?Q?Juli=E1n?= Albo, Jan 10, 2007
    #3
  4. jstfrths

    Mensanator Guest

    Julián Albo wrote:
    > Alf P. Steinbach wrote:
    >
    > > This is not strange at all. The first high level language was created
    > > by a woman, and the first bug introduced and found by a woman, the same

    >
    > And without using a debugger or an IDE


    Ha! In my day, we had to use an oscilloscope and a 555 timer
    connected to the reset pin. Or an EPROM filled with NOPs.

    > ... even without a computer.


    And we had to lick the road clean with our tounges.

    >
    > --
    > Salu2
     
    Mensanator, Jan 11, 2007
    #4
  5. jstfrths

    Old Wolf Guest

    Mensanator wrote:
    > And we had to lick the road clean with our tounges.


    With your whats?
     
    Old Wolf, Jan 11, 2007
    #5
  6. jstfrths

    Tim Slattery Guest

    "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:

    >* jstfrths:
    >> Although most computer programmers are men, the very first programmer
    >> was a woman, Lady Augusta Ada Lovelace. Her mechanical computer, called
    >> an " analytical machine" was created by Charles Babbage and used punch
    >> cards for input. The year was 1852 - from
    >> www.intellectual-playground.com

    >
    >This is not strange at all. The first high level language was created
    >by a woman,


    Hold it right there! I think you're talking about Grace Murray Hopper,
    the naval officer who was a member of the original CODASYL committee,
    which drew up the first set of specifications for COBOL. She
    participated, yes, but she did not create the entire thing.

    >and the first bug introduced and found by a woman, the same
    >one, incidentally.


    Grace Murray Hopper again. She found an insect in the innards of a
    malfunctioning circuit and taped it into a logbook. But the term "bug"
    had been in use by electrical engineers quite a while before that
    incident.

    >And we'd probably not have the atom bomb (as early
    >as we did, anyway) except for the work of a woman.


    Now you've lost me. Who are you talking about?

    --
    Tim Slattery

    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
    Tim Slattery, Jan 11, 2007
    #6
  7. jstfrths

    osmium Guest

    "Tim Slattery" wrote:

    <scroll to end>

    > "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >
    >>* jstfrths:
    >>> Although most computer programmers are men, the very first programmer
    >>> was a woman, Lady Augusta Ada Lovelace. Her mechanical computer, called
    >>> an " analytical machine" was created by Charles Babbage and used punch
    >>> cards for input. The year was 1852 - from
    >>> www.intellectual-playground.com

    >>
    >>This is not strange at all. The first high level language was created
    >>by a woman,

    >
    > Hold it right there! I think you're talking about Grace Murray Hopper,
    > the naval officer who was a member of the original CODASYL committee,
    > which drew up the first set of specifications for COBOL. She
    > participated, yes, but she did not create the entire thing.
    >
    >>and the first bug introduced and found by a woman, the same
    >>one, incidentally.

    >
    > Grace Murray Hopper again. She found an insect in the innards of a
    > malfunctioning circuit and taped it into a logbook. But the term "bug"
    > had been in use by electrical engineers quite a while before that
    > incident.
    >
    >>And we'd probably not have the atom bomb (as early
    >>as we did, anyway) except for the work of a woman.

    >
    > Now you've lost me. Who are you talking about?


    I think he is talking about Lisa Meitner.
     
    osmium, Jan 11, 2007
    #7
  8. * Tim Slattery:
    > "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >
    >> And we'd probably not have the atom bomb (as early
    >> as we did, anyway) except for the work of a woman.

    >
    > Now you've lost me. Who are you talking about?


    Marie Curie, 1911 Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering radium and
    polonium (and the first person ever to receive /two/ Nobel prizes).

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Jan 11, 2007
    #8
  9. jstfrths

    Tim Slattery Guest

    "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:

    >* Tim Slattery:
    >> "Alf P. Steinbach" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> And we'd probably not have the atom bomb (as early
    >>> as we did, anyway) except for the work of a woman.

    >>
    >> Now you've lost me. Who are you talking about?

    >
    >Marie Curie, 1911 Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering radium and
    >polonium (and the first person ever to receive /two/ Nobel prizes).


    Osmium said Lise Meitner, who (IMHO) has a better claim. She figured
    out that the tiny bit of matter that couldn't be accounted for when a
    Uranium atom fissioned, when passed through Einstein's equation e =
    mc**2, worked out to the exact amount of energy needed to cause the
    fragments to fly apart the way they did. Matter to energy
    transformation! Meitner never got a Nobel prize, but should have. She
    was exiled from Nazi Germany because she was Jewish.


    --
    Tim Slattery

    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
    Tim Slattery, Jan 11, 2007
    #9
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