Source of components in development projects?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Lou Arnold, May 30, 2005.

  1. Lou Arnold

    Lou Arnold Guest

    In a development environment, what is the source of components for
    applications being written? In other words, are a set of components
    installed from say Visual C++ .Net??

    Let me explain my understanding of .NET:
    I understand that in the .Net concept, components (classes and DLLs)
    reside on some server and that these componenst are loaded and linked
    into an production application when the app requires it. The source
    for the components in a commercial server with some sort of
    subscription for compnents.

    However, what is the source of components when I write them in my
    office (assuming I'm a small business)? Surely none come installed
    with VC++ .Net. Would I have to subscribe to them and then require my
    customers that buy the program to subscribe to the component server?

    Lou Arnold
    Ottawa Canada
    Lou Arnold, May 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. Lou Arnold

    Jon Shemitz Guest

    Lou Arnold wrote:

    > In a development environment, what is the source of components for
    > applications being written? In other words, are a set of components
    > installed from say Visual C++ .Net??


    Yes. When you install Visual Studio, you get the standard WinForms
    components. Installing the .NET runtime installs these on client
    machines. You don't have to install them with your app on client
    machines, and you don't have to pay any royalties.

    > Let me explain my understanding of .NET:
    > I understand that in the .Net concept, components (classes and DLLs)
    > reside on some server and that these componenst are loaded and linked
    > into an production application when the app requires it. The source
    > for the components in a commercial server with some sort of
    > subscription for compnents.


    This is one way of describing it. In practice, installing the .NET
    runtime installs the standard WinForms components in the GAC. When you
    license 3rd-party components, these are often installed on your
    computer (but not in the GAC) and compiling an app copies the
    libraries that you use (along with a license file) to the directory as
    the application executable. You can then just copy this directory
    (less various debugging and compile-time files) to users machines.

    > However, what is the source of components when I write them in my
    > office (assuming I'm a small business)? Surely none come installed
    > with VC++ .Net. Would I have to subscribe to them and then require my
    > customers that buy the program to subscribe to the component server?


    Licensing is up to third party component vendors. Most simply charge
    you a flat fee, and allow unlimited redistribution. Some do require
    you to track installations, and pay royalties on a per-installation
    basis. I haven't heard of any that require the end-users to pay, but I
    suppose it's *possible*.

    --

    www.midnightbeach.com
    Jon Shemitz, May 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. Lou Arnold

    Lou Arnold Guest

    Interesting. A few more questions please:

    What does "GAC" stand for and mean?

    When you say "the .NET runtime" are referring to the Windows >NET
    Framework 1.0 or the 2.o beta, or are you referring to a runtime
    package that comes with (Visual Studio)?

    Must I purchase Visual Studio as a whole to get all the components
    that you mentioned, or can I just purchase say VC++ .NET?

    Lou.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Mon, 30 May 2005 14:28:39 -0700, Jon Shemitz
    <> wrote:

    >Lou Arnold wrote:
    >
    >> In a development environment, what is the source of components for
    >> applications being written? In other words, are a set of components
    >> installed from say Visual C++ .Net??

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------->
    >Yes. When you install Visual Studio, you get the standard WinForms
    >components. Installing the .NET runtime installs these on client
    >machines. You don't have to install them with your app on client
    >machines, and you don't have to pay any royalties.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >> Let me explain my understanding of .NET:
    >> I understand that in the .Net concept, components (classes and DLLs)
    >> reside on some server and that these componenst are loaded and linked
    >> into an production application when the app requires it. The source
    >> for the components in a commercial server with some sort of
    >> subscription for compnents.

    >
    >This is one way of describing it. In practice, installing the .NET
    >runtime installs the standard WinForms components in the GAC. When you
    >license 3rd-party components, these are often installed on your
    >computer (but not in the GAC) and compiling an app copies the
    >libraries that you use (along with a license file) to the directory as
    >the application executable. You can then just copy this directory
    >(less various debugging and compile-time files) to users machines.
    >
    >> However, what is the source of components when I write them in my
    >> office (assuming I'm a small business)? Surely none come installed
    >> with VC++ .Net. Would I have to subscribe to them and then require my
    >> customers that buy the program to subscribe to the component server?

    >
    >Licensing is up to third party component vendors. Most simply charge
    >you a flat fee, and allow unlimited redistribution. Some do require
    >you to track installations, and pay royalties on a per-installation
    >basis. I haven't heard of any that require the end-users to pay, but I
    >suppose it's *possible*.
    >
    >--
    >
    >www.midnightbeach.com
    Lou Arnold, May 30, 2005
    #3
  4. Lou Arnold

    Jon Shemitz Guest

    > What does "GAC" stand for and mean?

    Global Assembly Cache - a repository for "strong named" assemblies.
    When your application tries to load an assembly without an explicit
    path, the runtime looks in the application directory (the directory
    the executable lives in), in the GAC, and (I believe) on the normal
    search path. (As you can tell, I've never tried to load an assembly
    from the path.)

    > When you say "the .NET runtime" are referring to the Windows >NET
    > Framework 1.0 or the 2.o beta, or are you referring to a runtime
    > package that comes with (Visual Studio)?


    Either 1.0, 1.1, or 2.0. The CLR and the other runtime libraries that
    you need to run a .NET app. The runtime is bundled with Visual Studio,
    but can be downloaded separately.

    > Must I purchase Visual Studio as a whole to get all the components
    > that you mentioned, or can I just purchase say VC++ .NET?


    As a minor member of the punditocracy, I typically get software for
    free, so I'm not really the one to ask. I believe, though I am not
    sure, that you can only get Visual C++ for .NET as part of a Visual
    Studio bundle. You can get VS stand-alone or via an MSDN subscription.
    A Google search should turn up the current offers pretty quickly.

    --

    www.midnightbeach.com
    Jon Shemitz, May 31, 2005
    #4
  5. Lou Arnold

    Lou Arnold Guest

    OK on all your comments, and thanks.

    Lou.


    On Mon, 30 May 2005 16:29:08 -0700, Jon Shemitz
    <> wrote:

    >> What does "GAC" stand for and mean?

    >
    >Global Assembly Cache - a repository for "strong named" assemblies.
    >When your application tries to load an assembly without an explicit
    >path, the runtime looks in the application directory (the directory
    >the executable lives in), in the GAC, and (I believe) on the normal
    >search path. (As you can tell, I've never tried to load an assembly
    >from the path.)
    >
    >> When you say "the .NET runtime" are referring to the Windows >NET
    >> Framework 1.0 or the 2.o beta, or are you referring to a runtime
    >> package that comes with (Visual Studio)?

    >
    >Either 1.0, 1.1, or 2.0. The CLR and the other runtime libraries that
    >you need to run a .NET app. The runtime is bundled with Visual Studio,
    >but can be downloaded separately.
    >
    >> Must I purchase Visual Studio as a whole to get all the components
    >> that you mentioned, or can I just purchase say VC++ .NET?

    >
    >As a minor member of the punditocracy, I typically get software for
    >free, so I'm not really the one to ask. I believe, though I am not
    >sure, that you can only get Visual C++ for .NET as part of a Visual
    >Studio bundle. You can get VS stand-alone or via an MSDN subscription.
    >A Google search should turn up the current offers pretty quickly.
    >
    >--
    >
    >www.midnightbeach.com
    Lou Arnold, May 31, 2005
    #5
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