space estimates

Discussion in 'Java' started by Roedy Green, May 25, 2004.

  1. Roedy Green

    Roedy Green Guest

    I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.


    I'd like to add a table for the Java glossary.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
     
    Roedy Green, May 25, 2004
    #1
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  2. Roedy Green

    Ryan Stewart Guest

    "Roedy Green" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    > space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.
    >
    >
    > I'd like to add a table for the Java glossary.
    >

    ..wav is generally 10M/minute. mp3's at 128bps are approximately 1/10th of
    their wav size. Those are rough numbers I've always used for guesstimating
    how much room audio files will take.
     
    Ryan Stewart, May 25, 2004
    #2
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  3. Roedy Green wrote:
    > I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    > space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.


    3600 * bitrate
     
    Michael Borgwardt, May 25, 2004
    #3
  4. Roedy Green

    jAnO! Guest

    "Michael Borgwardt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Roedy Green wrote:
    > > I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    > > space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.

    >
    > 3600 * bitrate

    * compression
     
    jAnO!, May 25, 2004
    #4
  5. jAnO! wrote:


    >>3600 * bitrate

    >
    > * compression


    No. "bitrate" is generally used for the net result *after* compression.
     
    Michael Borgwardt, May 25, 2004
    #5
  6. Roedy Green

    jAnO! Guest

    "Michael Borgwardt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > jAnO! wrote:
    >
    >
    > >>3600 * bitrate

    > >
    > > * compression

    >
    > No. "bitrate" is generally used for the net result *after*

    compression.

    I stand corected.
     
    jAnO!, May 25, 2004
    #6
  7. On Tue, 25 May 2004 15:23:26 +0200, jAnO! wrote:

    >
    > "Michael Borgwardt" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Roedy Green wrote:
    >> > I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    >> > space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.

    >>
    >> 3600 * bitrate

    > * compression


    Is bitrate per channel or the sum for all channels?

    La'ie Techie
     
    =?UTF-8?b?TMSByrtpZSBUZWNoaWU=?=, May 25, 2004
    #7
  8. Roedy Green

    Alan Meyer Guest

    "Roedy Green" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    > space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.


    For sound, you can vary the bit rate dramatically - with a corresponding
    variation in sound quality.

    I believe that digital telephones typically use around 44K bits per
    second, before compression, to encode voice. What you get from
    that sounds like, well, a telephone. After compression that might
    be only around 4 Kbps.

    The mp3 encoder used in Musicmatch Jukebox offers up to
    320 Kbps _after_ compression to store high quality stereo audio.

    You can also choose either fixed or variable rate compressions
    with variable rate the same quality with a lower average bit rate, but
    without being able to absolutely predict your file size from the
    time of play.

    Video is similar. You can choose a frame rate (number of frames
    per second), a pixel count (width and height of the screen),
    compression ratio, and encoding technology to optimize for size
    or for quality, as desired. For example, my Canon S30 digital
    camera stores 30 seconds of low quality 320x240 @ 15 frames
    per second in about 5.2 MB. Or it can store 2 minutes of even
    lower quality 160x120 video in the same space.

    What you can achieve will depend on what encoder you use, and
    what level of compression / degradation you can live with.

    Alan
     
    Alan Meyer, May 26, 2004
    #8
  9. LÄÊ»ie Techie wrote:
    >>>>I wonder if anyone has any figures on approximately how much disk
    >>>>space you need to store one hour of various audio and video formats.
    >>>
    >>>3600 * bitrate

    >>
    >>* compression

    >
    >
    > Is bitrate per channel or the sum for all channels?


    Obviously the sum of all channels, since the desired result is the
    total space requirement.
     
    Michael Borgwardt, May 26, 2004
    #9
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