standard to metric converter program

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by piaseckiac, Oct 27, 2003.

  1. piaseckiac

    piaseckiac Guest

    I am producing a website on air and need a link to change the entire
    website from standard to metric for temperature, pressure,
    miles-kilometers, and volume. Thank you.
     
    piaseckiac, Oct 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. piaseckiac

    Joe Guest

    "piaseckiac" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am producing a website on air and need a link to change the entire
    > website from standard to metric for temperature, pressure,
    > miles-kilometers, and volume. Thank you.


    http://www.initium.demon.co.uk/converts/metimp.htm. That what your looking
    for?
    --
    To reply direct, remove NOSPAM and replace with railwaysonline
    For Train Information, The Latest News & Best photos around check out the
    Award Winning Railways
    Online at http://www.railwaysonline.co.uk
     
    Joe, Oct 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. piaseckiac

    Evertjan. Guest

    piaseckiac wrote on 27 okt 2003 in comp.lang.javascript:
    > I am producing a website on air and need a link to change the entire
    > website from standard to metric for temperature, pressure,
    > miles-kilometers, and volume. Thank you.



    I thought metric was standard?
    <http://dbhs.wvusd.k12.ca.us/Humor/Funny-Metric-Chart.html>


    More comprehensive:
    <http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/200/202/mpo_home.htm>

    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
     
    Evertjan., Oct 27, 2003
    #3
  4. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    HikksNotAtHome said:
    >
    >In article <Xns9421CBDDF9C3Aeejj99@194.109.133.29>, "Evertjan."
    ><> writes:
    >
    >>I thought metric was standard?

    >
    >Its an Americanism to call inches/feet and such "Standard" and is indicative of
    >a lack of understanding of the fact that the web is world wide, where the
    >"Standard" is inded Metric (as you knew).


    No, that's a silly, bigoted notion. It has nothing to do with
    lack of understanding of the web. It's the very reasonable
    result of having been taught in school, in marketing materials,
    and in industry that there are two measuring systems, called
    "Standard" and "Metric".

    Froogle for a "standard socket set" and for "metric socket set"
    and you'll see that the point of confusion is not in the OP.
    That's simply the most common way the systems are referenced.
    It's no more incorrect than calling an apartment a "flat".
     
    Lee, Oct 28, 2003
    #4
  5. piaseckiac

    Evertjan. Guest

    Lee wrote on 28 okt 2003 in comp.lang.javascript:
    > No, that's a silly, bigoted notion. It has nothing to do with
    > lack of understanding of the web. It's the very reasonable
    > result of having been taught in school, in marketing materials,
    > and in industry that there are two measuring systems, called
    > "Standard" and "Metric".
    >
    > Froogle for a "standard socket set" and for "metric socket set"


    Those webpages are ment for a country/region specific "audience".
    Usenet, or at least this NG is pretty worldwide.

    > and you'll see that the point of confusion is not in the OP.
    > That's simply the most common way the systems are referenced.


    But it is. It is an affront to the cyberworld to take it for granted that
    the readers of a posing know, even without specific warning, that the OP
    includes American, no U.S. specific meaning to a keyword.

    If I wrote "standard-" vs "u.s.-measures" you would be confused perhaps
    too.

    Even that lack of understanding inside the U.S. has led to a multimillion
    dollar crash on Mars.

    > It's no more incorrect than calling an apartment a "flat".


    Again, this depends on the audience.



    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
     
    Evertjan., Oct 28, 2003
    #5
  6. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    Evertjan. said:
    >
    >Lee wrote on 28 okt 2003 in comp.lang.javascript:
    >> No, that's a silly, bigoted notion. It has nothing to do with
    >> lack of understanding of the web. It's the very reasonable
    >> result of having been taught in school, in marketing materials,
    >> and in industry that there are two measuring systems, called
    >> "Standard" and "Metric".
    >>
    >> Froogle for a "standard socket set" and for "metric socket set"

    >
    >Those webpages are ment for a country/region specific "audience".
    >Usenet, or at least this NG is pretty worldwide.


    The point is to demonstrate that "standard" is a correct way
    to refer to the "English" measurement system in US English,
    and is not, as the previous poster suggested, meant to suggest
    that it is the international standard system of measurement.


    >> and you'll see that the point of confusion is not in the OP.
    >> That's simply the most common way the systems are referenced.

    >
    >But it is. It is an affront to the cyberworld to take it for granted that
    >the readers of a posing know, even without specific warning, that the OP
    >includes American, no U.S. specific meaning to a keyword.


    Nonsense. Any English-speaker who can't figure out what
    "standard" means when contrasted with "metric" shouldn't
    be trying to use a keyboard without supervision.

    >If I wrote "standard-" vs "u.s.-measures" you would be confused perhaps
    >too.


    No. The contrast makes it obvious.

    >Even that lack of understanding inside the U.S. has led to a multimillion
    >dollar crash on Mars.


    Not at all. That crash was caused by the complete failure
    to specify the measurement system, not by misunderstanding
    "standard" vs "metric".


    >> It's no more incorrect than calling an apartment a "flat".

    >Again, this depends on the audience.


    No, as long as the meaning is as obvious as "standard" is,
    when contrasted to "metric", it's perfectly reasonable for
    a person to post in their local idiomatic language.

    I refuse to believe that anybody who responded to the OP was
    confused by the meaning. They were simply looking for a
    chance to tweak an American nose. There are plenty of good
    examples of American stupidity in this newsgroup and elsewhere,
    but there are also plenty of good examples of anti-American
    bigotry and ignorance.
     
    Lee, Oct 28, 2003
    #6
  7. piaseckiac

    Evertjan. Guest

    Lee wrote on 28 okt 2003 in comp.lang.javascript:
    > I refuse to believe that anybody who responded to the OP was
    > confused by the meaning. They were simply looking for a
    > chance to tweak an American nose.


    As "they" was me, you could have seen my jokingly staged confusion was
    followed by a correct help link, more to the OP's point but forgotten in
    the follow up.

    --
    Evertjan.
    The Netherlands.
    (Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
     
    Evertjan., Oct 28, 2003
    #7
  8. JRS: In article <>, seen
    in news:comp.lang.javascript, piaseckiac <> posted
    at Mon, 27 Oct 2003 10:42:48 :-
    >I am producing a website on air and need a link to change the entire
    >website from standard to metric for temperature, pressure,
    >miles-kilometers, and volume. Thank you.


    Obviously an isolationist who does not realise, or does not care, or
    does not understand, that Internet News is an international medium; and
    that, as regards units of measurement, the USA is the odd man out, with
    everywhere else using the SI ("metric") system for almost all purposes.

    Well, perhaps not the only one; perhaps Myanmar and Liberia still use
    Imperial units.

    Measurements of ambient temperature look strange in Kelvins, though.

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk / ?? ©
    Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
    Correct <= 4-line sig. separator as above, a line precisely "-- " (SoRFC1036)
    Do not Mail News to me. Before a reply, quote with ">" or "> " (SoRFC1036)
     
    Dr John Stockton, Oct 28, 2003
    #8
  9. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    Evertjan. said:
    >
    >Lee wrote on 28 okt 2003 in comp.lang.javascript:
    >> I refuse to believe that anybody who responded to the OP was
    >> confused by the meaning. They were simply looking for a
    >> chance to tweak an American nose.

    >
    >As "they" was me, you could have seen my jokingly staged confusion was
    >followed by a correct help link, more to the OP's point but forgotten in
    >the follow up.


    No, actually, I don't think I ever read your original response,
    and wouldn't have objected to some good-natured teasing about it.
    My objection is to the characterization of the use of the term
    "standard" as:

    "... indicative of a lack of understanding of the fact that
    the web is world wide, ..."

    when, in fact, the term "standard" in this case has become an
    idiomatic name for the measurement system, which has lost most
    of the original meaning of being used universally.

    At one time it was common to call it the "English" system of
    measurement, but that became confusing when the UK dropped it.
     
    Lee, Oct 28, 2003
    #9
  10. piaseckiac

    RIck Measham Guest

    piaseckiac wrote:

    > I am producing a website on air and need a link to change the entire
    > website from standard to metric for temperature, pressure,
    > miles-kilometers, and volume. Thank you.


    If you're just looking for a way to convert static imperial values to static
    metric values, then Google is your friend. Do a goodle search for:

    20 inches in centimeters

    It knows a hell of a lot, including imaginary numbers:

    sqrt(-4)

    returns "-2i" !!!

    There's a huge number of units it understands for conversions too:

    100 pounds * 1 inch in calories

    Hope this helps!
    Cheers
    Rick


    --
    Obviously the reply-to is a fake. Just change the 'spam-' to 'i' so that the
    result sounds like why you go to an optometerist.
     
    RIck Measham, Oct 28, 2003
    #10
  11. JRS: In article <>, seen in
    news:comp.lang.javascript, Lee <> posted at Tue,
    28 Oct 2003 06:39:25 :-

    >>But it is. It is an affront to the cyberworld to take it for granted that
    >>the readers of a posing know, even without specific warning, that the OP
    >>includes American, no U.S. specific meaning to a keyword.

    >
    >Nonsense. Any English-speaker who can't figure out what
    >"standard" means when contrasted with "metric" shouldn't
    >be trying to use a keyboard without supervision.



    It is not a question of understanding, but of good manners.

    Outside the USA, it is widely realised that most Americans know or care
    little for the ways of the rest of the world. This is, in fact, why
    shooting, etc., at Americans is such a popular pastime in the more
    excitable countries.

    The technology is not yet (AFAIK) available to do that over the
    Internet, so we just do what we can to teach better ways to the Merkins,
    or at least to point out to others how wrong they are.

    Most who can read English are in countries where Metric is the standard.

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4 ©
    <URL:http://jibbering.com/faq/> Jim Ley's FAQ for news:comp.lang.javascript
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> JS maths, dates, sources.
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/JS/&c., FAQ topics, links.
     
    Dr John Stockton, Oct 28, 2003
    #11
  12. piaseckiac

    Fabian Guest

    Lee hu kiteb:

    > Evertjan. said:


    >> Those webpages are ment for a country/region specific "audience".
    >> Usenet, or at least this NG is pretty worldwide.

    >
    > The point is to demonstrate that "standard" is a correct way
    > to refer to the "English" measurement system in US English,
    > and is not, as the previous poster suggested, meant to suggest
    > that it is the international standard system of measurement.



    Unless you are writing for a specific national audience, it is bad style
    to use words for a specific meaning that is used only in that country.

    >> But it is. It is an affront to the cyberworld to take it for granted
    >> that the readers of a posing know, even without specific warning,
    >> that the OP includes American, no U.S. specific meaning to a keyword.

    >
    > Nonsense. Any English-speaker who can't figure out what
    > "standard" means when contrasted with "metric" shouldn't
    > be trying to use a keyboard without supervision.


    I do believe there are many people on the Internet, including this
    particular newsgroup, whose first language is NOT English.

    > I refuse to believe that anybody who responded to the OP was
    > confused by the meaning. They were simply looking for a
    > chance to tweak an American nose.


    In my country, "standard" (yes, its even an English-speaking country!
    English is an official language!) refers to units such as the xiber and
    the pulzier. Are these maybe what you had in mind?

    --
    --
    Fabian
    Visit my website often and for long periods!
    http://www.lajzar.co.uk
     
    Fabian, Oct 28, 2003
    #12
  13. piaseckiac

    Pat Norton Guest

    Lee wrote:
    >>Even that lack of understanding inside the U.S. has

    >led to a multimillion dollar crash on Mars.
    >
    >That crash was caused by the complete failure to
    >specify the measurement system, not by
    >misunderstanding "standard" vs "metric".


    The specification mandated metric units. The subcontractor, Lockheed
    Martin, failed use metric units.

    The official report says:
    "The MCO MIB [Mars Climate Orbiter Mishap Investigation Board] has
    determined that the root cause for the loss of the MCO spacecraft was
    the failure to use metric units in the coding of a ground software
    file, "Small Forces," used in trajectory models. Specifically,
    thruster performance data in English units instead of metric units was
    used in the software application code titled SM_FORCES (smallforces).
    The output from the SM_FORCES application code as required by a MSOP
    Project Software Interface Specification (SIS) was to be in metric
    units of Newton-seconds (N-s). Instead, the data was reported in
    English units of pound-seconds (lbf-s). The Angular Momentum
    Desaturation (AMD) file contained the output data from the SM_FORCES
    software. The SIS, which was not followed, defines both the format and
    units of the AMD file generated by ground-based computers."
    www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/risk/mco_mib_report.pdf
     
    Pat Norton, Oct 28, 2003
    #13
  14. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    Dr John Stockton said:
    >
    >JRS: In article <>, seen in
    >news:comp.lang.javascript, Lee <> posted at Tue,
    >28 Oct 2003 06:39:25 :-
    >
    >>>But it is. It is an affront to the cyberworld to take it for granted that
    >>>the readers of a posing know, even without specific warning, that the OP
    >>>includes American, no U.S. specific meaning to a keyword.

    >>
    >>Nonsense. Any English-speaker who can't figure out what
    >>"standard" means when contrasted with "metric" shouldn't
    >>be trying to use a keyboard without supervision.

    >
    >
    >It is not a question of understanding, but of good manners.
    >
    >Outside the USA, it is widely realised that most Americans know or care
    >little for the ways of the rest of the world. This is, in fact, why
    >shooting, etc., at Americans is such a popular pastime in the more
    >excitable countries.
    >
    >The technology is not yet (AFAIK) available to do that over the
    >Internet, so we just do what we can to teach better ways to the Merkins,
    >or at least to point out to others how wrong they are.



    Not only have you missed the entire point, but you've also managed
    to preach good manners while endorsing shooting people. How does
    that foot taste?
     
    Lee, Oct 29, 2003
    #14
  15. "Dr John Stockton" <> wrote in message
    news:e3oLRIOWMtn$...
    <snip>
    >Outside the USA, it is widely realised that most Americans
    >know or care little for the ways of the rest of the world.
    >This is, in fact, why shooting, etc., at Americans is such
    >a popular pastime in the more excitable countries.

    <snip>

    I am disappointed on purely logical grounds that you should propose this
    as a cause and effect relationship, and especially that you would state
    it as factual.

    My experience of the population of the UK is that the majority know and
    care little for the ways of the rest of the world. And my impression of
    the world population as a whole is that a significant proportion are too
    busy trying to survive to spare much thought for the peoples of distant
    lands.

    But the generalisations are irrelevant. Ignorance (of one thing or
    another) is widespread, inevitable and ultimately curable. The
    individual, upon being exposed to the notion that there are more ways of
    looking at any situation than just their own personal perspective, may
    prove to be too arrogant, self important and xenophobic to react with
    anything but hostility, then again they may recognise the reality of the
    situation, slap themselves on the forehead and never make the same
    mistake again.

    There is a danger in making generalisations about populations, nations,
    races, cultures, groups, etc. Individuals deserve to be judged by (and
    responsible for) their own actions.

    Richard.
     
    Richard Cornford, Oct 29, 2003
    #15
  16. JRS: In article <3f9ed665$0$2239$>, seen
    in news:comp.lang.javascript, RIck Measham <>
    posted at Wed, 29 Oct 2003 06:50:21 :-
    >piaseckiac wrote:
    >
    >> I am producing a website on air and need a link to change the entire
    >> website from standard to metric for temperature, pressure,
    >> miles-kilometers, and volume. Thank you.

    >
    >If you're just looking for a way to convert static imperial values to static
    >metric values, then Google is your friend.



    Provided that one remembers that the units used in America, which they
    tend to call English units, are not necessarily the same size as the
    units of the same name which have in the past been used in England, the
    rest of the UK, and in the Dominions and the other Colonies.

    The only safe name for the quaint units still used in America is
    probably "American units"; that way, the Rest of the World will realise
    that they (tRotW) cannot be sure what the Americans are talking about.

    In the above, I disregard Canada, since others can never be sure how
    much they are American and how much they are French; and also any other
    odd countries still using antiquated units (which are they?).

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk / ?? ©
    Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
    Correct <= 4-line sig. separator as above, a line precisely "-- " (SoRFC1036)
    Do not Mail News to me. Before a reply, quote with ">" or "> " (SoRFC1036)
     
    Dr John Stockton, Oct 29, 2003
    #16
  17. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    HikksNotAtHome said:
    >
    >In article <>, Lee <> writes:
    >
    >>>As "they" was me, you could have seen my jokingly staged confusion was
    >>>followed by a correct help link, more to the OP's point but forgotten in
    >>>the follow up.

    >>
    >>No, actually, I don't think I ever read your original response,
    >>and wouldn't have objected to some good-natured teasing about it.
    >>My objection is to the characterization of the use of the term
    >>"standard" as:
    >>
    >> "... indicative of a lack of understanding of the fact that
    >> the web is world wide, ..."

    >
    >Which would make me the "they". And if I weren't American, I probably wouldn't
    >find this whole conversation hilariously funny.


    I don't see the humor. Apparently you are bigotted against
    your own people. That happens.

    >>when, in fact, the term "standard" in this case has become an
    >>idiomatic name for the measurement system, which has lost most
    >>of the original meaning of being used universally.

    >
    >And if you go to just about any non-American country and ask "Whats the
    >standard measurement of length", you will get "Meters" 99% of the time.


    Of course. Why don't you see that that is not relevant?

    >>At one time it was common to call it the "English" system of
    >>measurement, but that became confusing when the UK dropped it.

    >
    >And now that the rest of the world has dropped it, it causes confusion when the
    >term is used in an international medium.


    Not when used in the context of "standard" vs "metric".
     
    Lee, Oct 29, 2003
    #17
  18. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    Fabian said:
    >
    >Lee hu kiteb:
    >


    >> The point is to demonstrate that "standard" is a correct way
    >> to refer to the "English" measurement system in US English,
    >> and is not, as the previous poster suggested, meant to suggest
    >> that it is the international standard system of measurement.

    >
    >
    >Unless you are writing for a specific national audience, it is bad style
    >to use words for a specific meaning that is used only in that country.


    No it isn't, if the meaning is clear in context.

    >> Nonsense. Any English-speaker who can't figure out what
    >> "standard" means when contrasted with "metric" shouldn't
    >> be trying to use a keyboard without supervision.

    >
    >I do believe there are many people on the Internet, including this
    >particular newsgroup, whose first language is NOT English.


    Of course. But if their vocabularly includes words like "inch",
    "mile", and "gallon", it should not be confusing to them to find
    "standard" contrasted with "metric".


    >> I refuse to believe that anybody who responded to the OP was
    >> confused by the meaning. They were simply looking for a
    >> chance to tweak an American nose.

    >
    >In my country, "standard" (yes, its even an English-speaking country!
    >English is an official language!) refers to units such as the xiber and
    >the pulzier. Are these maybe what you had in mind?


    I would hope that in your English-speaking country, it is normal
    to consider the context when interpretting a word.
     
    Lee, Oct 29, 2003
    #18
  19. piaseckiac

    Lee Guest

    Pat Norton said:
    >
    >Lee wrote:
    >>>Even that lack of understanding inside the U.S. has

    >>led to a multimillion dollar crash on Mars.
    >>
    >>That crash was caused by the complete failure to
    >>specify the measurement system, not by
    >>misunderstanding "standard" vs "metric".

    >
    >The specification mandated metric units. The subcontractor, Lockheed
    >Martin, failed use metric units.


    Ok, thanks.
    I heard wrong or mis-remembered. The point stands that it was
    not confusing of the terms "standard" vs "metric".
     
    Lee, Oct 29, 2003
    #19
  20. JRS: In article <>, seen in
    news:comp.lang.javascript, Lee <> posted at Wed,
    29 Oct 2003 06:44:36 :-
    >Pat Norton said:
    >>
    >>Lee wrote:
    >>>>Even that lack of understanding inside the U.S. has
    >>>led to a multimillion dollar crash on Mars.
    >>>
    >>>That crash was caused by the complete failure to
    >>>specify the measurement system, not by
    >>>misunderstanding "standard" vs "metric".

    >>
    >>The specification mandated metric units. The subcontractor, Lockheed
    >>Martin, failed use metric units.

    >
    >Ok, thanks.
    >I heard wrong or mis-remembered. The point stands that it was
    >not confusing of the terms "standard" vs "metric".


    There were, it seems, two stupidities involved.

    One was doing technical work in archaic units.

    The other was transferring the numbers of the data without checking the
    units of the data.

    Without the first, the second might well not have mattered, though there
    can still be confusion between, say, hectoPascals and megaPascals.

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk / ?? ©
    Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
    Correct <= 4-line sig. separator as above, a line precisely "-- " (SoRFC1036)
    Do not Mail News to me. Before a reply, quote with ">" or "> " (SoRFC1036)
     
    Dr John Stockton, Oct 29, 2003
    #20
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