Statistics...help with numpy/scipy install

Discussion in 'Python' started by Rex Macey, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. Rex Macey

    Rex Macey Guest

    I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't wantthe latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related to the normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is agood way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not, is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.
    Rex Macey, Feb 10, 2013
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 10/02/2013 17:35, Rex Macey wrote:
    > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related to the normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not, is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.
    >


    So what exactly went wrong when you tried to install this
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/1.7.0/ using commands
    that you haven't given us and got error messages that you also haven't
    given us?

    --
    Cheers.

    Mark Lawrence
    Mark Lawrence, Feb 10, 2013
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 02/10/2013 10:35 AM, Rex Macey wrote:
    > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning
    > programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who
    > doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves
    > functions related to the normal distribution. Based on my google
    > research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires
    > NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my
    > environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an
    > install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not, is
    > there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet
    > and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments
    > appreciated. Thanks.


    A casual google search seems to indicate that for now, SciPy and NumPy
    are for Python 2.x (2.7 is the latest). I could be wrong though and
    often am. I know a number of popular and useful packages are not yet
    available on Python 3.

    If you need to do a lot math stuff, there's a complete python system
    that bundles a lot of these tools together into a nice package. It's
    called Sage. http://www.sagemath.org/

    There are several non-python packages out there that are really handy as
    well:
    - R - if you need to do statistics. http://www.r-project.org/
    - Octave - a matlab-compatible language. http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/
    - SciLab - a math package that has a nice gui. http://www.scilab.org
    Michael Torrie, Feb 10, 2013
    #3
  4. On 10/02/2013 12:35 PM, Rex Macey wrote:
    > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related to the normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not, is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.
    >


    Rex,

    A good start for supplementary packages is PyPi, see:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Python_Package_Index

    The packages in PyPi can be downloaded using easy-install, see:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EasyInstall

    Yes, the Enthught Numpy is a good starting point.

    Good luck and have fun,

    Colin W
    Colin J. Williams, Feb 10, 2013
    #4
  5. On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 1:14 PM, Michael Torrie <> wrote:
    > On 02/10/2013 10:35 AM, Rex Macey wrote:
    > A casual google search seems to indicate that for now, SciPy and NumPy
    > are for Python 2.x (2.7 is the latest). I could be wrong though and
    > often am. I know a number of popular and useful packages are not yet
    > available on Python 3.

    My casual google search finds www.numpy.org as the first entry.
    Clicking on the download link, one can find numpy 1.7.0 for Python 3.3
    In all fairness, this was just released a few hours and is the first
    official version supporting 3.3
    However, numpy 1.6.2 did support 3.2
    There's not yet a Scipy release supporting 3.3 so the OP may wish to
    downgrade to Python3.2
    >
    > If you need to do a lot math stuff, there's a complete python system
    > that bundles a lot of these tools together into a nice package. It's
    > called Sage. http://www.sagemath.org/

    Sage doesn't run natively on Windows. Not necessarily a problem but
    should be mentioned.
    David Robinow, Feb 10, 2013
    #5
  6. On 10 February 2013 18:14, Michael Torrie <> wrote:
    > On 02/10/2013 10:35 AM, Rex Macey wrote:
    >> I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning
    >> programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who
    >> doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves
    >> functions related to the normal distribution.


    What functions did you want? The math module contains the error
    function erf() and the random module can generate normally distributed
    pseudo-random numbers, e.g.:

    >>> import math
    >>> from math import erf
    >>> erf(0.0)

    0.0
    >>> erf(1.0)

    0.842700792949715
    >>> from random import normalvariate
    >>> normalvariate(0.0, 1.0)

    -0.2793532098124607


    >> Based on my google
    >> research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires
    >> NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my
    >> environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an
    >> install for my environment and if so, where do I get it?


    There should be. Why doesn't it work?

    >> If not, is
    >> there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet
    >> and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments
    >> appreciated. Thanks.

    >
    > A casual google search seems to indicate that for now, SciPy and NumPy
    > are for Python 2.x (2.7 is the latest). I could be wrong though and
    > often am. I know a number of popular and useful packages are not yet
    > available on Python 3.


    numpy and scipy are both available for Python 3. They have been for
    some time and, on Ubuntu, can be installed from the OS repositories.
    For Windows the OP should use the sourceforge download page.


    Oscar
    Oscar Benjamin, Feb 10, 2013
    #6
  7. Rex Macey

    Rex Macey Guest

    The setup of numpy-1.7.0 leads to a Setup window with a message: "Python 3.3 is required for this package. Select installation to use:". Below that isan empty list box. Below that is an edit box for the Python Directory.

    I have Python 3.3 installed on c:\Python33.

    On Sunday, February 10, 2013 1:10:32 PM UTC-5, Mark Lawrence wrote:
    > On 10/02/2013 17:35, Rex Macey wrote:
    >
    > > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related to the normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an installthat works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not,is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet andinstall an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > So what exactly went wrong when you tried to install this
    >
    > http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/1.7.0/ using commands
    >
    > that you haven't given us and got error messages that you also haven't
    >
    > given us?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Cheers.
    >
    >
    >
    > Mark Lawrence
    Rex Macey, Feb 10, 2013
    #7
  8. Rex Macey

    Rex Macey Guest

    The setup of numpy-1.7.0 leads to a Setup window with a message: "Python 3.3 is required for this package. Select installation to use:". Below that isan empty list box. Below that is an edit box for the Python Directory.

    I have Python 3.3 installed on c:\Python33.

    On Sunday, February 10, 2013 1:10:32 PM UTC-5, Mark Lawrence wrote:
    > On 10/02/2013 17:35, Rex Macey wrote:
    >
    > > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learning programming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related to the normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an installthat works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post: Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not,is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet andinstall an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > So what exactly went wrong when you tried to install this
    >
    > http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/1.7.0/ using commands
    >
    > that you haven't given us and got error messages that you also haven't
    >
    > given us?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Cheers.
    >
    >
    >
    > Mark Lawrence
    Rex Macey, Feb 10, 2013
    #8
  9. Rex Macey

    Rex Macey Guest

    I should have added that the setup gives an error window "Cannot install" "Python version 3.3 required, which was not found in the registry."
    On Sunday, February 10, 2013 5:11:20 PM UTC-5, Rex Macey wrote:
    > The setup of numpy-1.7.0 leads to a Setup window with a message: "Python 3.3 is required for this package. Select installation to use:". Below that is an empty list box. Below that is an edit box for the Python Directory.
    >
    >
    >
    > I have Python 3.3 installed on c:\Python33.
    >
    >
    >
    > On Sunday, February 10, 2013 1:10:32 PM UTC-5, Mark Lawrence wrote:
    >
    > > On 10/02/2013 17:35, Rex Macey wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learningprogramming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related tothe normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post:Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not, is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > So what exactly went wrong when you tried to install this

    >
    > >

    >
    > > http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/1.7.0/ using commands

    >
    > >

    >
    > > that you haven't given us and got error messages that you also haven't

    >
    > >

    >
    > > given us?

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > --

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Cheers.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Mark Lawrence
    Rex Macey, Feb 10, 2013
    #9
  10. Rex Macey

    Rex Macey Guest

    I should have added that the setup gives an error window "Cannot install" "Python version 3.3 required, which was not found in the registry."
    On Sunday, February 10, 2013 5:11:20 PM UTC-5, Rex Macey wrote:
    > The setup of numpy-1.7.0 leads to a Setup window with a message: "Python 3.3 is required for this package. Select installation to use:". Below that is an empty list box. Below that is an edit box for the Python Directory.
    >
    >
    >
    > I have Python 3.3 installed on c:\Python33.
    >
    >
    >
    > On Sunday, February 10, 2013 1:10:32 PM UTC-5, Mark Lawrence wrote:
    >
    > > On 10/02/2013 17:35, Rex Macey wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > I'm new to Python with a new windows 8 machine (64-bit OS). Learningprogramming mainly for fun. Naturally I downloaded Python 3.3 (who doesn't want the latest and greatest). What I want involves functions related tothe normal distribution. Based on my google research, it appears that SCIPY is a good way to go. That requires NUMPY. I don't seem to find an install that works for my environment which leads to the questions on this post:Is there an install for my environment and if so, where do I get it? If not, is there another package I should use? Or do I need to bite the bullet and install an earlier version of Python. Suggestions and comments appreciated. Thanks.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > So what exactly went wrong when you tried to install this

    >
    > >

    >
    > > http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/1.7.0/ using commands

    >
    > >

    >
    > > that you haven't given us and got error messages that you also haven't

    >
    > >

    >
    > > given us?

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > --

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Cheers.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Mark Lawrence
    Rex Macey, Feb 10, 2013
    #10
  11. On 10 February 2013 22:14, Rex Macey <> wrote:
    > I should have added that the setup gives an error window "Cannot install" "Python version 3.3 required, which was not found in the registry."


    Yes, you should have added this information. Are you sure that Python
    3.3 is installed? Have you tried running it? e.g. when I run "python"
    in my terminal I get:

    oscar:~$ python
    Python 2.7.3 (default, Sep 26 2012, 21:51:14)
    [GCC 4.7.2] on linux2
    Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
    >>>


    >From within Python I can also query the version:
    >>> import sys
    >>> sys.version

    '2.7.3 (default, Sep 26 2012, 21:51:14) \n[GCC 4.7.2]'

    Can you get similar output to confirm that Python 3.3 is installed?


    Oscar
    Oscar Benjamin, Feb 11, 2013
    #11
  12. On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 5:14 PM, Rex Macey <> wrote:
    > I should have added that the setup gives an error window "Cannot install" "Python version 3.3 required, which was not found in the registry."


    I'm guessing that you installed a 64-bit python and are using a 32-bit numpy.
    David Robinow, Feb 11, 2013
    #12
  13. On Sun, 10 Feb 2013 21:22:24 -0500, David Robinow <>
    declaimed the following in gmane.comp.python.general:

    > On Sun, Feb 10, 2013 at 5:14 PM, Rex Macey <> wrote:
    > > I should have added that the setup gives an error window "Cannot install" "Python version 3.3 required, which was not found in the registry."

    >
    > I'm guessing that you installed a 64-bit python and are using a 32-bit numpy.


    Or they somehow found/built/installed a version of Python that did
    not add itself to the Windows registry at all.
    --
    Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber AF6VN
    HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/
    Dennis Lee Bieber, Feb 11, 2013
    #13
  14. Rex Macey

    Rex Macey Guest

    I am sure I have python installed. I have been running it. in command line the window title is c:\python33\python.exe. The first line begins Python 3..3.0. Later in the line is the string "64 bit <AMD64>] on Win32".

    Thus it appears I am trying to run a 32bit numpy with a 64bit python. (Seems like a big ole 64 bit python should be able to swallow a little 32 bittynumpy). Is there a 64bit numpy? If not why not? Can someone get on this? Seriously, I'm under the impression that I need the 64 bit python because I have a 64 bit OS.
    Rex Macey, Feb 14, 2013
    #14
  15. Rex Macey

    Terry Reedy Guest

    On 2/13/2013 9:38 PM, Rex Macey wrote:
    > I am sure I have python installed. I have been running it. in command
    > line the window title is c:\python33\python.exe. The first line
    > begins Python 3.3.0. Later in the line is the string "64 bit <AMD64>]
    > on Win32".
    >
    > Thus it appears I am trying to run a 32bit numpy with a 64bit python.
    > (Seems like a big ole 64 bit python should be able to swallow a
    > little 32 bitty numpy). Is there a 64bit numpy? If not why not?


    Ask the numpy people. I am surprised since a reason to be using 64
    rather than 32 bit python is to have objects larger than 2 gigabytes and
    memory larger than 4 gigabytes. Numerical/scientific programming is
    relatively likely to need such.

    > someone get on this? Seriously, I'm under the impression that I need
    > the 64 bit python because I have a 64 bit OS.


    If you look on your C: drive, you should have both 'Program Files' and
    'Program Files (x86)' directories. The latter is for 32 bit programs.

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
    Terry Reedy, Feb 14, 2013
    #15
  16. Rex Macey

    Dave Angel Guest

    On 02/13/2013 09:38 PM, Rex Macey wrote:
    > I am sure I have python installed. I have been running it. in command line the window title is c:\python33\python.exe. The first line begins Python 3.3.0. Later in the line is the string "64 bit <AMD64>] on Win32".
    >
    > Thus it appears I am trying to run a 32bit numpy with a 64bit python. (Seems like a big ole 64 bit python should be able to swallow a little 32 bitty numpy). Is there a 64bit numpy? If not why not? Can someone get on this? Seriously, I'm under the impression that I need the 64 bit python because I have a 64 bit OS.
    >


    I can't answer the Numpy aspects, but I can tell you about 32bit versus
    64bit.

    A 32 bit OS can only handle 32 bit applications. It's conceivable to
    build a 32bit OS that will load and run 64bit apps, but it's probably
    impractical, and I don't know of anybody who has tried.

    A 64bit OS can and does load both 32bit apps and 64bit apps. But once
    it has loaded the app, the entire process has to be of the same
    "bittedness". For Windows, that means any DLL's loaded from a 64bit
    process have to be 64bit, and any DLL's loaded from a 32bit process must
    be 32bit.

    A python library may consist entirely of Python code, in which case it
    would work for either 32bit or 64bit Python installation. But if the
    library includes DLL's (which Numpy certainly would) then there have to
    be separate versions of those DLL's.

    Now, that library installation package may decide to include both sets
    of DLL's, and just install the appropriate ones at installation time.
    But that choice is entirely up to the library author.

    --
    DaveA
    Dave Angel, Feb 14, 2013
    #16
  17. On 14 February 2013 05:29, Terry Reedy <> wrote:
    > On 2/13/2013 9:38 PM, Rex Macey wrote:
    >>
    >> I am sure I have python installed. I have been running it. in command
    >> line the window title is c:\python33\python.exe. The first line
    >> begins Python 3.3.0. Later in the line is the string "64 bit <AMD64>]
    >> on Win32".


    I don't know why you feel the need to paraphrase this information
    rather than simply paste the interpreter message into the email. The
    latter would be more useful for others trying to help understand your
    problem.

    >> Thus it appears I am trying to run a 32bit numpy with a 64bit python.
    >> (Seems like a big ole 64 bit python should be able to swallow a
    >> little 32 bitty numpy). Is there a 64bit numpy? If not why not?


    Because numpy/scipy make extensive use of Python's underlying binary
    interfaces. These are incompatible between 32 and 64 bit Python.

    > Ask the numpy people. I am surprised since a reason to be using 64 rather
    > than 32 bit python is to have objects larger than 2 gigabytes and memory
    > larger than 4 gigabytes. Numerical/scientific programming is relatively
    > likely to need such.


    Yes but most people who are doing that sort of thing would just
    compile their own numpy/scipy and probably wouldn't be using Windows
    for the their main computations anyway. Numpy does work on 64 bit
    Python but official binaries are not distributed via the sourceforge
    page. Unofficial binaries are available here:
    http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/#numpy

    >> someone get on this? Seriously, I'm under the impression that I need
    >> the 64 bit python because I have a 64 bit OS.


    I don't know about Windows 8 but I've used 32 bit Python on 64 bit XP
    no problem. My impression was that 64 bit Windows (unlike OSX and most
    Linux distros) ships with 32 bit duplicates of all its libraries so
    that it can run 32 bit applications without modification. My Windows
    usage significantly predates Windows 8, though so this may have
    changed some time ago.


    Oscar
    Oscar Benjamin, Feb 14, 2013
    #17
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Terry Reedy

    Re: numpy and scipy for Python 2.3

    Terry Reedy, Jul 10, 2003, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    452
    Terry Reedy
    Jul 10, 2003
  2. Paxcal
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,838
    Paxcal
    Feb 11, 2004
  3. robert
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,523
    Travis E. Oliphant
    Oct 29, 2006
  4. robert

    numpy/scipy: correlation

    robert, Nov 11, 2006, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    6,893
    robert
    Nov 16, 2006
  5. vml
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    689
Loading...

Share This Page