Suggestions for Python workshop

Discussion in 'Python' started by Yaroslav, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. Yaroslav

    Yaroslav Guest

    Hi, I'm preparing a 2 hour workshop titled "Python for Scientific
    Computing", the goal of which is to introduce people to using Python
    for their Scientific Computing needs. If you have good examples that
    illustrate Python's power for scientific computing, please post them
    here.

    Here's one example I had in mind -- Power Method for finding dominant
    eigenvector:

    # Define our matrix
    A = array([[2., 1.],
    [1., 2.]])

    # Define our starting vector
    x = array([1.,0.])
    x_old = 0.5*x

    # Iterate while not converged
    while max(x-x_old) > 0.00000001:
    x_old = x
    x = matrixmultiply(A, x)
    x/=max(x)

    # Print result
    print x
    # => [ 1. 1.]
     
    Yaroslav, Oct 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Yaroslav wrote:

    > Hi, I'm preparing a 2 hour workshop titled "Python for Scientific
    > Computing", the goal of which is to introduce people to using Python
    > for their Scientific Computing needs. If you have good examples that
    > illustrate Python's power for scientific computing, please post them
    > here.


    These aren't code snippets but full talks, but we're definitely using python
    for 'real' research:

    http://amath.colorado.edu/faculty/fperez/talks/04_03_ams_athens.pdf
    http://amath.colorado.edu/faculty/fperez/talks/04_09_scipy04_mwadap.pdf

    Here you'll also find other talks from the recent scipy'04:

    http://www.scipy.org/wikis/scipy04/ConferenceSchedule

    As far as code examples, I imagine all of scipy's code could be used :)

    best,

    f

    ps. Where are you teaching this? Just curious...
     
    Fernando Perez, Oct 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. In article <ck1lhc$qi9$>,
    Fernando Perez <> wrote:
    >Yaroslav wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, I'm preparing a 2 hour workshop titled "Python for Scientific
    >> Computing", the goal of which is to introduce people to using Python
    >> for their Scientific Computing needs. If you have good examples that
    >> illustrate Python's power for scientific computing, please post them
    >> here.

    >
    >These aren't code snippets but full talks, but we're definitely using python
    >for 'real' research:
    >
    >http://amath.colorado.edu/faculty/fperez/talks/04_03_ams_athens.pdf
    >http://amath.colorado.edu/faculty/fperez/talks/04_09_scipy04_mwadap.pdf
    >
    >Here you'll also find other talks from the recent scipy'04:
    >
    >http://www.scipy.org/wikis/scipy04/ConferenceSchedule
    >
    >As far as code examples, I imagine all of scipy's code could be used :)

    .
    .
    .
    I have strong feelings on this subject, only a fraction of which
    I'll be able to articulate this week.

    First, follow everything Fernando says; he's doing great work.

    Second, I see a variety of approaches to Python-for-scientists,
    and I hope you're able to end up with a Pythonic one. There's
    low-level how-to-ing: "this is an implementation of a
    Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm for PDE solution; you can use this in
    hydrodynamics to ..." What *really* gets interesting, though,
    are comparing Python to other vehicles--Matlab, C++, Fortran--
    and, if you're really good, opening the audience's eyes to the
    potential of a language which facilitates comprehension, collabor-
    ation, and experimentation. Most scientific listeners won't
    understand abstraction as it applies to software. Python-for-
    scientists represents a great opportunity.
     
    Cameron Laird, Oct 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Cameron Laird wrote:

    > I have strong feelings on this subject, only a fraction of which
    > I'll be able to articulate this week.
    >
    > First, follow everything Fernando says; he's doing great work.


    Thanks :) (blushes)

    > Second, I see a variety of approaches to Python-for-scientists,
    > and I hope you're able to end up with a Pythonic one. There's
    > low-level how-to-ing: "this is an implementation of a
    > Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm for PDE solution; you can use this in
    > hydrodynamics to ..." What *really* gets interesting, though,
    > are comparing Python to other vehicles--Matlab, C++, Fortran--
    > and, if you're really good, opening the audience's eyes to the
    > potential of a language which facilitates comprehension, collabor-
    > ation, and experimentation. Most scientific listeners won't
    > understand abstraction as it applies to software. Python-for-
    > scientists represents a great opportunity.


    Well, that's exactly the credo I've been trying to preach to all who are willing
    to listen over the last couple of years. I think I've made progress, at least
    by converting some people around me to these tools. But I'm quite interested
    in your opinion on the matter.

    <blatant plug ahead>

    If anyone from the Colorado Front Range area is interested on this subject, I'm
    scheduled to give the colloquium at the Mathematics and computer science
    department of the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, on Friday Nov. 19th (3pm)
    on this very topic. I hope to do justice to python's qualities for scientific
    work, but ideas from the c.l.py community are very welcome (I haven't written
    the talk yet, so there's time to put it in).

    Cheers,

    f
     
    Fernando Perez, Oct 7, 2004
    #4
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