Syncing notebook with desktop, and oh by the way I'm using eclipse.

Discussion in 'Java' started by Thomas G. Marshall, Sep 25, 2005.

  1. I'm curious about something.

    I'm doing java development on both my notebook and desktop system. I need
    to keep the two in sync.

    I /can/, of course, run synchronization software (that is not cognizant of
    java nor anything else but just files and folders) to keep the source
    folders up to date with each other, but I was wondering if there wasn't a
    way to have a CVS repository (or whatever else you can think of) handle this
    seamlessly, perhaps *within* eclipse.

    I'm not using CVS currently, but will if it helps. Or does eclipse have
    some other way of handling revisions and/or syncing? Or am I just going to
    have to sync them either by hand or by sync software?

    Is there some other way that folks manage this?


    --
    "I don't want FOP, God dammit! I'm a DAPPER DAN MAN!"
     
    Thomas G. Marshall, Sep 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Thomas G. Marshall

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 00:54:28 GMT, "Thomas G. Marshall"
    <> wrote or quoted
    :

    >I /can/, of course, run synchronization software (that is not cognizant of
    >java nor anything else but just files and folders) to keep the source
    >folders up to date with each other, but I was wondering if there wasn't a
    >way to have a CVS repository (or whatever else you can think of) handle this
    >seamlessly, perhaps *within* eclipse.


    Let's say you had a CVS or other version control server running either
    locally or remotely. (I don't know if hidden in CVS somewhere is a
    CVS server).

    Then you could check your work and check out on the other machine.
    Only the changes would go across. The catch is, your work in progress
    would not be transferred, only files checked in. That would probably
    not be a good thing.

    If you were trying to propagate to a number of machines I would
    suggest the Replicator. See
    http://mindprod.com/applets/replicator.html

    There you upload your changes to a website and others automatically
    download just the changes they need. The advantage over competing
    systems is there in no software needed on the server -- just vanilla
    HTTP.

    If you can tie the two machines together over a LAN link so one looks
    like drive of the other, you can write a 4NT script that will just
    copy the newer or different sized files.
    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/fornt.html

    You could also write that with a fairly simple Java program using
    File.list and File.size and File.lastModified. You might want to use
    the file transport classes to do the copying. See
    http://mindprod.com/products1.html#FILETRANSFER

    There are also probably a ton of platform specific programs for sync.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. Roedy Green coughed up:
    > On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 00:54:28 GMT, "Thomas G. Marshall"
    > <> wrote or quoted
    >>

    >
    >> I /can/, of course, run synchronization software (that is not
    >> cognizant of java nor anything else but just files and folders) to
    >> keep the source folders up to date with each other, but I was
    >> wondering if there wasn't a way to have a CVS repository (or
    >> whatever else you can think of) handle this seamlessly, perhaps
    >> *within* eclipse.

    >
    > Let's say you had a CVS or other version control server running either
    > locally or remotely. (I don't know if hidden in CVS somewhere is a
    > CVS server).
    >
    > Then you could check your work and check out on the other machine.
    > Only the changes would go across. The catch is, your work in progress
    > would not be transferred, only files checked in. That would probably
    > not be a good thing.
    >
    > If you were trying to propagate to a number of machines I would
    > suggest the Replicator. See
    > http://mindprod.com/applets/replicator.html


    Is this something that you use for this purpose? I'd really like to hear
    from more in this ng about this. I can't believe it isn't a problem that
    everyone has faced in one form or another.

    >
    > There you upload your changes to a website and others automatically
    > download just the changes they need. The advantage over competing
    > systems is there in no software needed on the server -- just vanilla
    > HTTP.
    >
    > If you can tie the two machines together over a LAN link so one looks
    > like drive of the other, you can write a 4NT script that will just
    > copy the newer or different sized files.
    > see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/fornt.html


    This is currently how many of the freeware synchronization softwares work.
    Syncing two directories, and where the directories actually are is up to the
    OS.


    >
    > You could also write that with a fairly simple Java program using
    > File.list and File.size and File.lastModified. You might want to use
    > the file transport classes to do the copying. See
    > http://mindprod.com/products1.html#FILETRANSFER
    >
    > There are also probably a ton of platform specific programs for sync.


    None of them smooth. I would love to hear real-world solutions.

    Basically, I turn on my notebook, and something behind the scenes does a
    quick check on the desktop to see if there is anything newer. And the same
    in reverse.

    I'm currently experimenting with these three:

    1. source tree copying
    2. file sharing (has some issues)
    3. punting and remote desktoping from notebook->desktop, so the world
    (everything) remains on the desktop.





    --
    Doesn't /anyone/ know where I can find a credit card company that
    emails me the minute something is charged to my account?
     
    Thomas G. Marshall, Sep 25, 2005
    #3
  4. Thomas G. Marshall

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 01:57:54 GMT, Roedy Green
    <> wrote or quoted :

    > (I don't know if hidden in CVS somewhere is a
    >CVS server).


    Obviously the answer to that question is yes. What I meant to say was
    I don't know if hidden in Eclipse somewhere is a CVS server.
    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Thomas G. Marshall

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sun, 25 Sep 2005 14:53:49 GMT, "Thomas G. Marshall"
    <> wrote or quoted
    :

    >> If you were trying to propagate to a number of machines I would
    >> suggest the Replicator. See
    >> http://mindprod.com/applets/replicator.html

    >
    >Is this something that you use for this purpose? I'd really like to hear
    >from more in this ng about this. I can't believe it isn't a problem that
    >everyone has faced in one form or another.


    The Replicator is something I wrote for the pharmaceutical industry to
    share research data.

    One researcher is the librarian who maintains a file tree of papers,
    presentations, files, programs... Every so often he runs the
    replicator which detects which files have REALLY changed not just been
    redated or regenerated the same way, bundles up the changes into small
    zip files and posts them on a website, and then uploads a small index
    file to the collection of zips.

    The client uses a JAWS program that logs into the website, downloads
    the index file, figures out which zips they need, and downloads just
    those zips to bring them up to date. It decompresses the zips as it
    goes. The end user just sees a reasonably up to date and copy of the
    files that is at least consistent with the way they were on the master
    at some point in time. The server is just a vanilla HTTP server with
    optional login access.

    The Replicator sometimes repackages zips that contain a lot of
    deadwood. It does its uploads and deletes in such a way as you never
    run into contention between uploader and downloader the way you do
    with simple HTML files. The key is it never modifies the uploaded
    files, just gradually "retires" them.

    The Replicator survives disconnects. It just picks up where it left
    off the next time you run it.

    The Replicator is also designed to create CDs for use on secure
    machines that don't have Internet access, but still need to be kept up
    to date. You can pop CD into driven on a LAN then have various copies
    of the database access just what they need to update themselves.

    At some point they want to do a version where each file is encrypted
    with control of who is allowed to view what files, all controlled by
    thumbdrives with private keys in them.

    If you are curious how it works, the source code is posted on my
    website. I also allow you to mirror my website for fast access using
    it.
    See http://mindprod.com/webstarts/replicator.html

    There are two major improvements it might develop in future:

    1. incremental updates. Now files up updated atomically as a whole, so
    one comma change causes the whole file to be redistributed (in
    compressed form). This is not a big concern with my website mirror or
    with the pharmaceutical people since the files are all small.

    2. support for splitting very large files up into several zips.
    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Thomas G. Marshall

    Jan Schaefer Guest

    Roedy Green wrote:
    > What I meant to say was
    > I don't know if hidden in Eclipse somewhere is a CVS server.


    No, there isn't. Eclipse has a CVS client built-in. You can use a local
    CVS repository or a repository laying on a remote maschine over SSH.

    Just my two eurocents,

    Jan
     
    Jan Schaefer, Sep 26, 2005
    #6
  7. Jan Schaefer coughed up:
    > Roedy Green wrote:
    >> What I meant to say was
    >> I don't know if hidden in Eclipse somewhere is a CVS server.

    >
    > No, there isn't. Eclipse has a CVS client built-in. You can use a
    > local CVS repository or a repository laying on a remote maschine over
    > SSH.
    > Just my two eurocents,
    >
    > Jan



    Hmmm....

    How plausible/possible is it to create a view plugin in eclipse to manage
    folder synchronization. I'd probably design it over TCP, rather than rely
    on any OS mounting.

    --
    Puzzle: You are given a deck of cards all face down
    except for 10 cards mixed in which are face up.
    If you are in a pitch black room, how do you divide
    the deck into two piles (may be uneven) that each
    contain the same number of face-up cards?
    Answer (rot13): Sebz naljurer va gur qrpx, qrny bhg
    gra pneqf naq syvc gurz bire.
     
    Thomas G. Marshall, Sep 26, 2005
    #7
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