systematic file(s) deletion

Discussion in 'Java' started by NickName, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Hi,

    Say, I have a bunch of files sitting under C:\Program
    Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles directory,
    and I'm running out of disk space, so, I'd like to sysmatically remove
    all the file that is more than two days old under this directory. How
    would I do that?

    Please work with me through the following semi-code.

    // first, need to point to/move to this directory, how?
    /*
    There's this method to find out current directory,
    System.getProperty("user.dir");
    is there any method that would set current directory such as
    System.setProperty("user.dir") = "C:\Program
    Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles"; ??
    */
    ....

    // now, we're ready to instantiate the directory
    File dir = new File("MyDirectoryName");

    // use var children as file names, use array to store them
    String[] children = dir.list();
    // validation
    if (children == null) {
    // Either dir does not exist or is not a directory
    } else {
    // some sort of preparation
    int c = 0;
    Date today = new Date();

    // iteration of files
    for (int i=0; i<children.length; i++) {
    // Get filename of file or directory
    String filename = children;
    // debug to display files
    System.out.println(filename);

    // find each file's date/time stamp
    // var c for file counter, increment it
    c++;

    // could we use dynamic var name like "file"&c where "file" is
    string and c is var value?
    File "file"&c = new File(filename);
    long "file"&c&"date = "file"&c.lastModified;

    /* now compare each file's date stamp against today's date if
    it's two days old delete it,
    DatePart? How to? */
    ...
    // delete file
    boolean del = (new File("file"&c)).delete();

    }
    }

    Better way? Many thanks in advance.
     
    NickName, Dec 19, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. NickName

    Daniel Dyer Guest

    On Tue, 19 Dec 2006 20:52:51 -0000, NickName <> wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Say, I have a bunch of files sitting under C:\Program
    > Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles directory,
    > and I'm running out of disk space, so, I'd like to sysmatically remove
    > all the file that is more than two days old under this directory. How
    > would I do that?
    >
    > Please work with me through the following semi-code.
    >
    > // first, need to point to/move to this directory, how?
    > /*
    > There's this method to find out current directory,
    > System.getProperty("user.dir");
    > is there any method that would set current directory such as
    > System.setProperty("user.dir") = "C:\Program
    > Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles"; ??
    > */
    > ...


    I'd use the find command (under Cygwin on Windows). The command would
    look something like this (I have tested to make sure this is correct):

    find "C:\Program Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles" -mtime 3 -exec rm -f {} \;

    Dan.

    --
    Daniel Dyer
    http://www.uncommons.org
     
    Daniel Dyer, Dec 19, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. NickName

    Daniel Dyer Guest

    On Tue, 19 Dec 2006 21:01:24 -0000, Daniel Dyer <"You don't need it">
    wrote:

    > I'd use the find command (under Cygwin on Windows). The command would
    > look something like this (I have tested to make sure this is correct):


    Sorry, I meant *haven't* tested (as in don't blame me if it trashes your
    file system).

    Dan.

    --
    Daniel Dyer
    http://www.uncommons.org
     
    Daniel Dyer, Dec 19, 2006
    #3
  4. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Daniel Dyer wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Dec 2006 21:01:24 -0000, Daniel Dyer <"You don't need it">
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I'd use the find command (under Cygwin on Windows). The command would
    > > look something like this (I have tested to make sure this is correct):

    >
    > Sorry, I meant *haven't* tested (as in don't blame me if it trashes your
    > file system).
    >
    > Dan.
    >
    > --
    > Daniel Dyer
    > http://www.uncommons.org


    Ok, I just looked up info on Cygwin. It would not be applicable to
    what I need in my working environment. Additionally, I'd like to use
    this case to learn more basics on file manipulation in java. Thanks
    though.
     
    NickName, Dec 20, 2006
    #4
  5. NickName

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "NickName" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Say, I have a bunch of files sitting under C:\Program
    > Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles directory,
    > and I'm running out of disk space, so, I'd like to sysmatically remove
    > all the file that is more than two days old under this directory. How
    > would I do that?
    >
    > Please work with me through the following semi-code.
    >
    > // first, need to point to/move to this directory, how?
    > /*
    > There's this method to find out current directory,
    > System.getProperty("user.dir");
    > is there any method that would set current directory such as
    > System.setProperty("user.dir") = "C:\Program
    > Files\ThisProgram\DataFiles"; ??
    > */


    The concept of a "current" directory isn't well defined in Java,
    possibly because it isn't well defined across all the OSes that Java
    supports. If you wanted to make this an actual utility for users to use,
    best to have the user provide the path to the directory they want to operate
    on as a command line argument or something similar.

    > ...
    >
    > // now, we're ready to instantiate the directory
    > File dir = new File("MyDirectoryName");
    >
    > // use var children as file names, use array to store them
    > String[] children = dir.list();
    > // validation
    > if (children == null) {
    > // Either dir does not exist or is not a directory
    > } else {
    > // some sort of preparation
    > int c = 0;
    > Date today = new Date();
    >
    > // iteration of files
    > for (int i=0; i<children.length; i++) {
    > // Get filename of file or directory
    > String filename = children;
    > // debug to display files
    > System.out.println(filename);
    >
    > // find each file's date/time stamp
    > // var c for file counter, increment it
    > c++;
    >
    > // could we use dynamic var name like "file"&c where "file" is
    > string and c is var value?


    No, you can't use "dynamic var names" in the way that you described. The
    closest thing I can think of to what you're trying to do is to use an array.
    But a simpler way would be to not keep around a reference to every file
    you're going to work with, but rather to just keep a reference to the single
    file you're currently working with at that time.

    > File "file"&c = new File(filename);
    > long "file"&c&"date = "file"&c.lastModified;


    File doesn't have a publicly accessible "lastModified" field, but it has
    a lastModified() method which you can invoke.

    >
    > /* now compare each file's date stamp against today's date if
    > it's two days old delete it,
    > DatePart? How to? */


    Numerical comparison is typically done via the >, >=, ==, !=, =< and <
    operators.

    > ...
    > // delete file
    > boolean del = (new File("file"&c)).delete();
    >
    > }
    > }
    >
    > Better way? Many thanks in advance.


    This is probably a dangerous program to learn Java with, since you might
    mistakenly delete data that you don't want to delete by accidentally
    introducing bugs into your program. Why not write a less destructive program
    for the purposes of learning? Maybe one that merely *lists* all files older
    than a certain age, and leaves it up to the user to manually delete them?

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 20, 2006
    #5
  6. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Thanks for the very helpful advice, pls see below.

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "NickName" <> wrote in message
    > news:...

    [...]
    >
    > The concept of a "current" directory isn't well defined in Java,
    > possibly because it isn't well defined across all the OSes that Java
    > supports. If you wanted to make this an actual utility for users to use,
    > best to have the user provide the path to the directory they want to operate
    > on as a command line argument or something similar.


    Good idea of letting user to provide this via a param, however, the
    downside, could be a typo in the path, so, maybe let user select a
    directory would be good.

    >
    > No, you can't use "dynamic var names" in the way that you described. The
    > closest thing I can think of to what you're trying to do is to use an array.
    > But a simpler way would be to not keep around a reference to every file
    > you're going to work with, but rather to just keep a reference to the single
    > file you're currently working with at that time.


    Good to know.

    >
    > > File "file"&c = new File(filename);
    > > long "file"&c&"date = "file"&c.lastModified;

    >
    > File doesn't have a publicly accessible "lastModified" field, but it has
    > a lastModified() method which you can invoke.


    My typo, it should have read "file"&c.lastModified[];

    > >
    > > /* now compare each file's date stamp against today's date if
    > > it's two days old delete it,
    > > DatePart? How to? */

    >
    > Numerical comparison is typically done via the >, >=, ==, !=, =< and <
    > operators.


    Good to know. A specific date comparison question below.

    // list all files under Temp folder.
    File dir = new File("Temp");

    String[] children = dir.list();
    if (children == null) {
    // Either dir does not exist or is not a
    directory
    } else {
    for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {
    // Get filename of file or directory
    String filename = children;

    if ((new Date()) - (new
    Date(filename.???()))) > 30
    // find file(s) that is older than 30
    days
    // what method to use?

    {
    System.out.println("\nTemp: " +
    filename);
    }
    }
    }


    >
    > > ...
    > > // delete file
    > > boolean del = (new File("file"&c)).delete();
    > >
    > > }
    > > }
    > >
    > > Better way? Many thanks in advance.

    >
    > This is probably a dangerous program to learn Java with, since you might
    > mistakenly delete data that you don't want to delete by accidentally
    > introducing bugs into your program. Why not write a less destructive program
    > for the purposes of learning? Maybe one that merely *lists* all files older
    > than a certain age, and leaves it up to the user to manually delete them?


    Well, I could use a TEMP directory, data there are no longer of value.

    >
    > - Oliver
     
    NickName, Dec 26, 2006
    #6
  7. NickName wrote:
    > Thanks for the very helpful advice, pls see below.
    >
    > Oliver Wong wrote:
    >
    >>"NickName" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...

    >
    > [...]
    >
    >> The concept of a "current" directory isn't well defined in Java,
    >>possibly because it isn't well defined across all the OSes that Java
    >>supports. If you wanted to make this an actual utility for users to use,
    >>best to have the user provide the path to the directory they want to operate
    >>on as a command line argument or something similar.

    >
    > Good idea of letting user to provide this via a param, however, the
    > downside, could be a typo in the path, so, maybe let user select a
    > directory would be good.


    There's something called JFileChooser that you might find interesting if
    so. :)
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 27, 2006
    #7
  8. NickName

    NickName Guest

    John Ersatznom wrote:
    > NickName wrote:
    > > Thanks for the very helpful advice, pls see below.
    > >
    > > Oliver Wong wrote:
    > >
    > >>"NickName" <> wrote in message
    > >>news:...

    > >
    > > [...]
    > >
    > >> The concept of a "current" directory isn't well defined in Java,
    > >>possibly because it isn't well defined across all the OSes that Java
    > >>supports. If you wanted to make this an actual utility for users to use,
    > >>best to have the user provide the path to the directory they want to operate
    > >>on as a command line argument or something similar.

    > >
    > > Good idea of letting user to provide this via a param, however, the
    > > downside, could be a typo in the path, so, maybe let user select a
    > > directory would be good.

    >
    > There's something called JFileChooser that you might find interesting if
    > so. :)


    Good to know. Thanks. Could you answer the following question?

    A specific date comparison question below.

    // list all files under Temp folder.
    File dir = new File("Temp");

    String[] children = dir.list();
    if (children == null) {
    // Either dir does not exist or is not a
    directory
    } else {
    for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {
    // Get filename of file or directory
    String filename = children;


    if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.???()))) > 30
    // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    // what method to use?


    {
    System.out.println("\nTemp: " + filename);
    }
    }
    }
     
    NickName, Dec 27, 2006
    #8
  9. NickName

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "NickName" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > String filename = children;
    >
    > if ((new Date()) - (new
    > Date(filename.???()))) > 30
    > // find file(s) that is older than 30
    > days
    > // what method to use?


    The File class has a method to get the date of last modification, called
    lastModified(). You have an instance of a String, which presumably
    represents the path to a file. File also has a constructor which accepts a
    String.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 27, 2006
    #9
  10. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "NickName" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > String filename = children;
    > >
    > > if ((new Date()) - (new
    > > Date(filename.???()))) > 30
    > > // find file(s) that is older than 30
    > > days
    > > // what method to use?

    >
    > The File class has a method to get the date of last modification, called
    > lastModified(). You have an instance of a String, which presumably
    > represents the path to a file. File also has a constructor which accepts a
    > String.
    >
    > - Oliver


    Right. Initially I used the lastModified() method, the code looked
    like,
    if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.lastModified())) > 30
    // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    // assumed the millseconds and whatever Date() produces
    would
    // be able to auto convert?
    But it failed to compile. Or am I wrong?

    Many thanks.
     
    NickName, Dec 27, 2006
    #10
  11. NickName

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "NickName" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Right. Initially I used the lastModified() method, the code looked
    > like,
    > if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.lastModified())) > 30
    > // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    > // assumed the millseconds and whatever Date() produces
    > would
    > // be able to auto convert?
    > But it failed to compile. Or am I wrong?


    Invoke lastModified() on the date, not the string.

    new Date(filename).lastModified()

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 27, 2006
    #11
  12. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "NickName" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > Right. Initially I used the lastModified() method, the code looked
    > > like,
    > > if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.lastModified())) > 30
    > > // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    > > // assumed the millseconds and whatever Date() produces
    > > would
    > > // be able to auto convert?
    > > But it failed to compile. Or am I wrong?

    >
    > Invoke lastModified() on the date, not the string.
    >
    > new Date(filename).lastModified()
    >
    > - Oliver
     
    NickName, Dec 28, 2006
    #12
  13. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "NickName" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > Right. Initially I used the lastModified() method, the code looked
    > > like,
    > > if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.lastModified())) > 30
    > > // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    > > // assumed the millseconds and whatever Date() produces
    > > would
    > > // be able to auto convert?
    > > But it failed to compile. Or am I wrong?

    >
    > Invoke lastModified() on the date, not the string.
    >
    > new Date(filename).lastModified()
    >
    > - Oliver


    Thanks. Made change accordingly, however, the following code still
    won't work
    if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename).lastModified())) > 30 {
    System.out.println("\nTemp files older than 30 days: " +
    filename);
    };

    Also, tried,
    System.out.println(new Date(filename).getTime());
    for testing, won't work neither. What's wrong?
     
    NickName, Dec 28, 2006
    #13
  14. NickName

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "NickName" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Thanks. Made change accordingly, however, the following code still
    > won't work
    > if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename).lastModified())) > 30 {
    > System.out.println("\nTemp files older than 30 days: " +
    > filename);
    > };
    >
    > Also, tried,
    > System.out.println(new Date(filename).getTime());
    > for testing, won't work neither. What's wrong?


    In the future, when something "won't work", you should probably state
    what results you got (your computer exploded? You got a compile error? A
    runtime exception? The program runs fine, but didn't do what you expected it
    to do?), what results you expected (the program is supposed to calculate the
    fibbonacci sequence? Determine prime factors?), and how they differed (in
    case the difference is too subtle for us to notice).

    I'm guessing that you had some sort of compile error in the first case,
    and I have no idea what results you got with the second case (maybe a
    ParseException? Or it ran but with results you didn't understand nor
    expect?)

    The problem in the first case is that you're applying the subtraction
    operator on a Date object, "(new Date()) - [something]" when the subtraction
    operator is only defined on numbers. Based on the text in your println()
    statement, it looks like you're testing whether a file is older than 30
    days.

    If that's the case, notice that the string that you supply to the Date
    constructor is supposed to represent a date, and not a filename. E.g. the
    contents of the string should look like "Jan 1st, 2007" and not
    "C:\myfile.txt".

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 28, 2006
    #14
  15. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "NickName" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> [...]
    >>

    > In the future, when something "won't work", you should probably state
    > what results you got (your computer exploded? You got a compile error? A
    > runtime exception? The program runs fine, but didn't do what you expected it
    > to do?), what results you expected (the program is supposed to calculate the
    > fibbonacci sequence? Determine prime factors?), and how they differed (in
    > case the difference is too subtle for us to notice).
    >
    > I'm guessing that you had some sort of compile error in the first case,
    > and I have no idea what results you got with the second case (maybe a
    > ParseException? Or it ran but with results you didn't understand nor
    > expect?)
    >
    > The problem in the first case is that you're applying the subtraction
    > operator on a Date object, "(new Date()) - [something]" when the subtraction
    > operator is only defined on numbers. Based on the text in your println()
    > statement, it looks like you're testing whether a file is older than 30
    > days.
    >
    > If that's the case, notice that the string that you supply to the Date
    > constructor is supposed to represent a date, and not a filename. E.g. the
    > contents of the string should look like "Jan 1st, 2007" and not
    > "C:\myfile.txt".
    >
    > - Oliver


    Ok. Sorry for not providing exact err msg.

    Now, here's the latest attempt. Many thanks.

    // test output today's day extraction, divide milliseconds
    System.out.println("test date manipulation:" + (new
    Date().getTime()) / (8640000));
    // result: successful


    // list files

    File dir = new File("Temp");

    String[] children = dir.list();
    if (children == null) {
    // Either dir does not exist or is not a
    directory
    } else {
    for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {
    // Get filename of file or directory
    String filename = children;
    File fd = new File(filename);
    long ftime = fd.lastModified();

    // test output of the file day value
    System.out.println(ftime);
    // result: 0
    // comment: bad
    // question: what's wrong?

    // System.out.println("now = " + new
    Date().getTime());
    /* debug */
    // 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 = 1 day = 8640000

    // System.out.println((new File(filename).lastModified()) /
    (8640000));
    /*
    if ( (new Date().getTime()) / (8640000) - (new
    File(filename).lastModified()) / (8640000) ) > 30
    {
    System.out.println("\nTemp files
    older than 30 days: " + filename);
    };
    */
    }
     
    NickName, Dec 28, 2006
    #15
  16. NickName

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "NickName" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Oliver Wong wrote:
    >> In the future, when something "won't work", you should probably state
    >> what results you got (your computer exploded? You got a compile error? A
    >> runtime exception? The program runs fine, but didn't do what you expected
    >> it
    >> to do?), what results you expected (the program is supposed to calculate
    >> the
    >> fibbonacci sequence? Determine prime factors?), and how they differed (in

    [...]
    >
    > Now, here's the latest attempt.

    [code snipped]

    Okay. Does it work and you're just showing it to us, or is there some
    problem and you want us to help you fix the problem?

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 28, 2006
    #16
  17. NickName

    EJP Guest

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "NickName" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>Right. Initially I used the lastModified() method, the code looked
    >>like,
    >>if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.lastModified())) > 30
    >> // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    >> // assumed the millseconds and whatever Date() produces
    >>would
    >> // be able to auto convert?
    >>But it failed to compile. Or am I wrong?

    >
    >
    > Invoke lastModified() on the date, not the string.
    >
    > new Date(filename).lastModified()


    Nonsense. Date doesn't have a lastModified() method. What you need is

    if ((System.getCurrentTimeMillis() - (filename.lastModified()) >
    30*24*60*60*1000L)
     
    EJP, Dec 29, 2006
    #17
  18. NickName wrote:
    > if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.???()))) > 30
    > // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    > // what method to use?


    Check out the API docs, particularly Date's compareTo and File's
    lastModified methods.

    http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/
     
    John Ersatznom, Dec 29, 2006
    #18
  19. NickName

    Oliver Wong Guest

    "EJP" <> wrote in message
    news:YJ0lh.15062$...
    > Oliver Wong wrote:
    >> "NickName" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>Right. Initially I used the lastModified() method, the code looked
    >>>like,
    >>>if ((new Date()) - (new Date(filename.lastModified())) > 30
    >>> // find file(s) that is older than 30 days
    >>> // assumed the millseconds and whatever Date() produces
    >>>would
    >>> // be able to auto convert?
    >>>But it failed to compile. Or am I wrong?

    >>
    >>
    >> Invoke lastModified() on the date, not the string.
    >>
    >> new Date(filename).lastModified()

    >
    > Nonsense. Date doesn't have a lastModified() method. What you need is
    >
    > if ((System.getCurrentTimeMillis() - (filename.lastModified()) >
    > 30*24*60*60*1000L)


    You're right about the date not having a lastModified method, but
    neither does filename, which I suspect is a String.

    In other words, the OP really needs to address the usenet issues I've
    been addressing before we can hope to seriously help with the problem: Post
    an SSCCE, state exactly what the problem is (it won't compile? An exception
    is thrown? Something else?), and state what the program is supposed to do.

    Without this information, everyone will be confused (as demonstrated by
    my error, and EJP's error, etc.) and will give incorrect advice.

    I've lost the motivation to help NickName, and probably will not regain
    this motivation until the SSCCE and other issues above are addressed.

    - Oliver
     
    Oliver Wong, Dec 29, 2006
    #19
  20. NickName

    NickName Guest

    Oliver Wong wrote:
    > "EJP" <> wrote in message
    > news:YJ0lh.15062$...

    [...]
    > In other words, the OP really needs to address the usenet issues I've
    > been addressing before we can hope to seriously help with the problem: Post
    > an SSCCE, state exactly what the problem is (it won't compile? An exception
    > is thrown? Something else?), and state what the program is supposed to do.
    >
    > Without this information, everyone will be confused (as demonstrated by
    > my error, and EJP's error, etc.) and will give incorrect advice.
    >
    > I've lost the motivation to help NickName, and probably will not regain
    > this motivation until the SSCCE and other issues above are addressed.
    >
    > - Oliver



    /* objective: list files in the Temp directory that are 30 days older
    than today's date */

    /* one way to solve the problem: compare today's date with each file's
    dateTimeStamp */

    // specifically, the technique to use here is to get today's date value
    by
    // using (new Date().getTime()) / (8640000));

    // and another technique of using File Class's lastModified() method
    // to get "similar" value for the date of each file
    // this technique works with "known" file, see a case below.

    File fileD = new File("TestFile.txt");
    long fdate = fileD.lastModified();
    System.out.println("\t and it was last edited on " + fdate);

    // here's the clean code with Comments

    // list files
    // the Temp directory has 10 files, of which one
    file name includes white spaces

    File dir = new File("Temp");


    String[] children = dir.list();
    if (children == null) {

    } else {
    for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {

    String filename = children;
    File fd = new File(filename);

    // debug: to print out each file name
    System.out.println(fd);
    // result: yes it does

    long ftime = fd.lastModified();
    // test output of the file day value
    System.out.println(ftime);
    // result: 0
    // comment: bad
    // question: what's wrong?

    }
     
    NickName, Dec 29, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. rinkal brahmbhatt

    deletion of aspx file from the project

    rinkal brahmbhatt, Aug 4, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    439
    Lau Lei Cheong
    Aug 4, 2004
  2. =?Utf-8?B?RGlnZ2xlcg==?=

    Waiting for a file deletion to continue

    =?Utf-8?B?RGlnZ2xlcg==?=, Oct 13, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    376
    =?Utf-8?B?RGlnZ2xlcg==?=
    Oct 14, 2004
  3. BlueFrog

    File Deletion Problem

    BlueFrog, Feb 16, 2005, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    631
    BlueFrog
    Feb 17, 2005
  4. Replies:
    21
    Views:
    1,442
    Alex Vinokur
    Aug 18, 2007
  5. John Regehr

    systematic miscompilation of volatile accesses

    John Regehr, Apr 29, 2008, in forum: C Programming
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    482
    John Regehr
    Apr 29, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page