table stretch entire height

Discussion in 'HTML' started by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Marcel_St=F6r?=, Nov 23, 2003.

  1. Hi all,

    I would like to create a table like this

    -----------
    | |
    -----------
    | |
    -----------
    | |
    * *
    -----------

    where the * means that the last row should stretch all the way down to the
    bottom of the visible area of the browser. According to W3 and its rigorous
    standards the table's height attribute has become proprietary (always was?).
    How do I achive the same effect without this mighty attribute?

    Regards,
    Marcel
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Marcel_St=F6r?=, Nov 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. =?iso-8859-1?Q?Marcel_St=F6r?=

    Nick Howes Guest

    "Marcel Stör" <marcel at frightanic dot com> wrote in message
    news:3fc13bda$0$132$...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I would like to create a table like this
    >
    > -----------
    > | |
    > -----------
    > | |
    > -----------
    > | |
    > * *
    > -----------
    >
    > where the * means that the last row should stretch all the way down to the
    > bottom of the visible area of the browser. According to W3 and its

    rigorous
    > standards the table's height attribute has become proprietary (always

    was?).
    > How do I achive the same effect without this mighty attribute?


    Without the height attribute, you can't. What is this table for? Maybe
    somebody could suggest a different way to accomplish what you're trying to
    do.
     
    Nick Howes, Nov 24, 2003
    #2
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  3. =?iso-8859-1?Q?Marcel_St=F6r?=

    Josh Guest


    > I would like to create a table like this
    >
    > -----------
    >> |

    > -----------
    >> |

    > -----------
    >> |

    > * *
    > -----------


    When I use tables for design I usually find it better to think of the tables
    not as one vertical one, but as multiple tables that stretch from left to
    right. It might use a bit more code, but it loads a lot faster, rather than
    the user waiting for a whole table to load. When I do this, I make my last
    table a percent height to fill in the gap. Maybe its not the best method,
    maybe somebody else knows better, but it seems to work for me.

    --Josh
     
    Josh, Nov 24, 2003
    #3
  4. "Nick Howes" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:bprmcj$8th$...
    > "Marcel Stör" <marcel at frightanic dot com> wrote in message
    > news:3fc13bda$0$132$...
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I would like to create a table like this
    > >
    > > -----------
    > > | |
    > > -----------
    > > | |
    > > -----------
    > > | |
    > > * *
    > > -----------
    > >
    > > where the * means that the last row should stretch all the way down to

    the
    > > bottom of the visible area of the browser. According to W3 and its

    > rigorous
    > > standards the table's height attribute has become proprietary (always

    > was?).
    > > How do I achive the same effect without this mighty attribute?

    >
    > Without the height attribute, you can't. What is this table for? Maybe
    > somebody could suggest a different way to accomplish what you're trying to
    > do.


    I'm trying to find a way around the height attribute.
    If you look at http://test.toastmasterszug.ch/left.htm you will see that
    there are two buttons then another row with the fading image and one last
    row with the logo in it. This last row should stretch from the fading image
    to the bottom. I need this because of the (table)background image that is
    repeated down to the bottom.
    Instead of heaving a repeated bg image that is only a few pixels high I
    could instead produce an image that is lets say 1000 pixels high. This would
    certainly cause the table to stretch far enough - for most screen seetings.
    I'm trouble if someone has a higher resolution than 1600*1200, though.

    Regards,
    Marcel
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Marcel_St=F6r?=, Nov 24, 2003
    #4
  5. Marcel Stör wrote:

    > where the * means that the last row should stretch all the way down to the
    > bottom of the visible area of the browser. According to W3 and its rigorous
    > standards the table's height attribute has become proprietary (always was?).
    > How do I achive the same effect without this mighty attribute?


    Always was.

    http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/scratch/stretch

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132
     
    Toby A Inkster, Nov 24, 2003
    #5
  6. Josh wrote:
    [snip]
    > When I use tables for design I usually find it better to think of the
    > tables not as one vertical one, but as multiple tables that stretch
    > from left to right. It might use a bit more code, but it loads a lot
    > faster, rather than the user waiting for a whole table to load. When
    > I do this, I make my last table a percent height to fill in the gap.
    > Maybe its not the best method, maybe somebody else knows better, but
    > it seems to work for me.


    The CSS style { table-layout: fixed; } is intended to speed up rendering of
    tables. It tells the browser to freeze the position according to the widths of
    the cells in the first row, so that it doesn't have to wait for the rest of
    the content to find out what the widths should be.

    Modern browsers certainly freeze the widths when this is used. I don't know
    how well they speed up rendering. It is hard for me to test because I use
    broadband.

    http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/tables.html#fixed-table-layout

    Use with care - you must ensure that the browser really can make a sensible
    decision at the first row! (Besides, I think your approach of using multiple
    tables is useful anyway, because it divides the content into simpler modules).

    --
    Barry Pearson
    http://www.Barry.Pearson.name/photography/
    http://www.BirdsAndAnimals.info/
    http://www.ChildSupportAnalysis.co.uk/
     
    Barry Pearson, Nov 24, 2003
    #6
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