Terminology Question

Discussion in 'C++' started by CuriousFellow, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Because of a cognitive disability which takes special delight in tormenting
    me with perceptual problems, particularly with respect to language, I'm
    often required to seek external confirmation before I can make substantive
    headway in trying to learn new things. Anything to do with computers is a
    particular challenge, especially because of a certain company's penchant for
    renaming/redefining things.

    I haven't had much success in other forums, probably because people think
    I'm some kind of troll (?), but I assure you the difficulty is quite real.
    Hopefully you'll take a chance and provide some needed assistance from time
    to time.

    Since getting interested in programming, I keep running across references to
    "workspace file" but no clear explanation of what it is. A Google search
    didn't turn up much that was helpful except "this is a workspace on the
    server where you can share files" on a page about "Workspace File Manager,"
    and "a workspace file (e.g., filename.wor) is a plain ascii file that
    contains..." on a site about some "MapBasic" or MapInfo program. Is
    "workspace" synonomous with "directory" (my guess) or am I off on a wrong
    tangent?
     
    CuriousFellow, Apr 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. CuriousFellow wrote:
    >
    > Because of a cognitive disability which takes special delight in tormenting
    > me with perceptual problems, particularly with respect to language, I'm
    > often required to seek external confirmation before I can make substantive
    > headway in trying to learn new things. Anything to do with computers is a
    > particular challenge, especially because of a certain company's penchant for
    > renaming/redefining things.
    >
    > I haven't had much success in other forums, probably because people think
    > I'm some kind of troll (?), but I assure you the difficulty is quite real.
    > Hopefully you'll take a chance and provide some needed assistance from time
    > to time.
    >
    > Since getting interested in programming, I keep running across references to
    > "workspace file" but no clear explanation of what it is. A Google search
    > didn't turn up much that was helpful except "this is a workspace on the
    > server where you can share files" on a page about "Workspace File Manager,"
    > and "a workspace file (e.g., filename.wor) is a plain ascii file that
    > contains..." on a site about some "MapBasic" or MapInfo program. Is
    > "workspace" synonomous with "directory" (my guess) or am I off on a wrong
    > tangent?


    'Workspace file' doesn't have one clear meaning. It depends on the
    context in which this phrase is used. Eg. my development environment
    has something called 'workspace'. In this context it means: all
    files which make up the whole project. The list of these files is
    stored in the workspace file.

    --
    Karl Heinz Buchegger
     
    Karl Heinz Buchegger, Apr 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. "CuriousFellow" <> wrote in message
    news:estjc.13327$...
    > Because of a cognitive disability which takes special delight in

    tormenting
    > me with perceptual problems, particularly with respect to language, I'm
    > often required to seek external confirmation before I can make

    substantive
    > headway in trying to learn new things. Anything to do with computers is a
    > particular challenge, especially because of a certain company's penchant

    for
    > renaming/redefining things.
    >
    > I haven't had much success in other forums, probably because people think
    > I'm some kind of troll (?), but I assure you the difficulty is quite

    real.
    > Hopefully you'll take a chance and provide some needed assistance from

    time
    > to time.
    >
    > Since getting interested in programming, I keep running across references

    to
    > "workspace file" but no clear explanation of what it is. A Google search
    > didn't turn up much that was helpful except "this is a workspace on the
    > server where you can share files" on a page about "Workspace File

    Manager,"
    > and "a workspace file (e.g., filename.wor) is a plain ascii file that
    > contains..." on a site about some "MapBasic" or MapInfo program. Is
    > "workspace" synonomous with "directory" (my guess) or am I off on a wrong
    > tangent?


    What a "workspace" is cannot be answered without knowing the context; it
    can mean different things in different contexts. However in the context of
    the C++ language this question cannot be answered. The concept of
    "workspace" is not defined in the C++ standard (IOW the question is
    off-topic here), nor does it require having a "workspace" concept. As far
    as the C++ language is concerned a "workspace" can be anything.

    <offtopic>
    Some IDE's use workspace files to store the collection of projects you are
    working on. Sometimes they also store additional info like which windows
    were open before you closed the IDE and other settings, so the next day you
    can leave off from the point where you stopped the day before. Not
    essential, but it can be convenient. If you want to know exactly what the
    "workspace" is you are talking about you will have to consult the
    documentation of the tool that uses them, or consult a newsgroup/forum
    dedicated to that tool.
    </offtopic>

    --
    Peter van Merkerk
    peter.van.merkerk(at)dse.nl
     
    Peter van Merkerk, Apr 27, 2004
    #3

  4. >
    > <offtopic>
    > Some IDE's use workspace files to store the collection of projects you are
    > working on. Sometimes they also store additional info like which windows
    > were open before you closed the IDE and other settings, so the next day you
    > can leave off from the point where you stopped the day before. Not
    > essential, but it can be convenient. If you want to know exactly what the
    > "workspace" is you are talking about you will have to consult the
    > documentation of the tool that uses them, or consult a newsgroup/forum
    > dedicated to that tool.
    > </offtopic>


    Peter, fancy source code editors and IDE's like to try and organize all your
    source code files into "projects". That way, when you run the editor, rather
    than having to open 10 different files manually, you can just ask it to open
    some project and voila -- all files are loaded (or at least easily available)
    to you within the IDE.

    The IDE has to store "project information" somewhere, so it creates a "project
    file" (sometimes binary, sometimes text). This project file is usually only
    useful to the IDE or editor that created it.

    When you've got a number of projects that depend on each other (and say, you're
    using your IDE to automatically build them for you), and you want to edit
    portions of each of them at the same time, you can tell your IDE to group
    them together by creating a "workspace". Again, it's implemented as a file
    like with projects, but instead of managing individual files, it manages
    projects.

    If you use a nice editor like NEdit, and tools like ctags, gdb/ddd, g++ and
    the binutils (yes, I agree, there should be a band named "g++ and the
    binutils". :) ), you won't be dealing with project files or workspace files.

    I'm not sure where this post would've been appropriate. Maybe at
    comp.os.linux.development.apps



    --
    --- remove zees if contacting via email ---
     
    John M. Gabriele, Apr 27, 2004
    #4
  5. John M. Gabriele wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Peter, [snip]


    Whoops. Sorry. That previous post was directed at "Curious Fellow",
    not Peter. Doh. :)

    --
    --- remove zees if contacting via email ---
     
    John M. Gabriele, Apr 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Thanks to all 3 of you for responding. I've only managed to install Linux so
    far, not learn how to use it. But I'll try the
    comp.os.linux.development.apps group if that's where you think this type of
    question would be more appropriate.
     
    CuriousFellow, Apr 29, 2004
    #6
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