The Future of Java Development.....

Discussion in 'Java' started by vgps68@gmail.com, Mar 17, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I've been programming using Java professionally since 1998 after doing
    VB programming for a few years. JDBC opened the gates, servlets added
    output, jsp added even more output, taglibs inverted everything, and
    then there was Struts (and 5 other competitors), Spring, Hibernate
    (and 5 other competitors), 14 different App Servers, the endless horde
    of IBM outpourings, the current XML purgatory that is stuck in the
    middle of everything, Oracle jumping in etc etc etc etc. IntelliJ,
    NetBeans and Eclipse seem to be the primary dev. tools - JDeveloper is
    excellent as well and I'm sure there are others.

    What was once a simple, fun and creative process that was
    intellectually challenging and paid pretty well until our Corporate
    Masters decided we could be replaced by anyone from anyplace else who
    would work for less has become an absolute hellish quagmire of
    configuration conflicts, code version inconsistencies, 20 minute
    builds for 'Hello World' jsp files, so many jar files you need an
    external hard drive etc. etc. etc.

    Am I the only one tired of this?

    I've recently been exploring Seam, EJB3/Hibernate and JSF (NO JSPs
    allowed). I can actually create 'pages' graphically with NetBeans 6,
    adjust properties to HTML items and attach events to these items. Seam
    cuts out most of the idiotic middle-level mapping between tables and
    POJOS, uses annotations to get rid of tons of XML. Seam requires a
    fair number of XML files but no more than six or seven (I can live
    with that). I'm by no means an expert in any of this, but I've spent
    about 40 hours experimenting with this combination of technologies and
    I'm just about sold.


    Anyone have any opinions on all of this?
    , Mar 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Arne Vajhøj Guest

    wrote:
    > I've been programming using Java professionally since 1998 after doing
    > VB programming for a few years. JDBC opened the gates, servlets added
    > output, jsp added even more output, taglibs inverted everything, and
    > then there was Struts (and 5 other competitors), Spring, Hibernate
    > (and 5 other competitors), 14 different App Servers, the endless horde
    > of IBM outpourings, the current XML purgatory that is stuck in the
    > middle of everything, Oracle jumping in etc etc etc etc. IntelliJ,
    > NetBeans and Eclipse seem to be the primary dev. tools - JDeveloper is
    > excellent as well and I'm sure there are others.


    > I've recently been exploring Seam, EJB3/Hibernate and JSF (NO JSPs
    > allowed). I can actually create 'pages' graphically with NetBeans 6,
    > adjust properties to HTML items and attach events to these items. Seam
    > cuts out most of the idiotic middle-level mapping between tables and
    > POJOS, uses annotations to get rid of tons of XML. Seam requires a
    > fair number of XML files but no more than six or seven (I can live
    > with that). I'm by no means an expert in any of this, but I've spent
    > about 40 hours experimenting with this combination of technologies and
    > I'm just about sold.


    That is the the direction most are going.

    Note though that I am not so convinced that we in 5 years
    still will consider annotations scattered all over the code
    better than central XML files.

    > What was once a simple, fun and creative process that was
    > intellectually challenging and paid pretty well until our Corporate
    > Masters decided we could be replaced by anyone from anyplace else who
    > would work for less has become an absolute hellish quagmire of
    > configuration conflicts, code version inconsistencies, 20 minute
    > builds for 'Hello World' jsp files, so many jar files you need an
    > external hard drive etc. etc. etc.


    That has not really anything to do with technology.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 18, 2008
    #2
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  3. Hello

    On Mar 17, 6:08 pm, wrote:
    > I've recently been exploring Seam, EJB3/Hibernate and JSF (NO JSPs
    > allowed). I can actually create 'pages' graphically with NetBeans 6,
    > adjust properties to HTML items and attach events to these items. Seam
    > cuts out most of the idiotic middle-level mapping between tables and
    > POJOS, uses annotations to get rid of tons of XML. Seam requires a
    > fair number of XML files but no more than six or seven (I can live
    > with that). I'm by no means an expert in any of this, but I've spent
    > about 40 hours experimenting with this combination of technologies and
    > I'm just about sold.
    >
    > Anyone have any opinions on all of this?


    I'm just finishing my first seam application. Will go into production
    in the next few weeks. It is a small/mediumish project (about 35
    klojsc). Let me tell you, it was not pain free. You still have a
    couple of things to learn and a couple of problems to solve, just like
    any other framework. What I like about it is that some hard problems
    are well solved, like security, the conversational context and the
    transaction mechanisms.

    Regards

    MM
    Marcelo Morales, Mar 18, 2008
    #3
  4. Guest

    On Mar 18, 6:40 am, Marcelo Morales <>
    wrote:
    > Hello
    >
    > On Mar 17, 6:08 pm, wrote:
    >
    > > I've recently been exploring Seam, EJB3/Hibernate and JSF (NO JSPs
    > > allowed). I can actually create 'pages' graphically with NetBeans 6,
    > > adjust properties to HTML items and attach events to these items. Seam
    > > cuts out most of the idiotic middle-level mapping between tables and
    > > POJOS, uses annotations to get rid of tons of XML. Seam requires a
    > > fair number of XML files but no more than six or seven (I can live
    > > with that). I'm by no means an expert in any of this, but I've spent
    > > about 40 hours experimenting with this combination of technologies and
    > > I'm just about sold.

    >
    > > Anyone have any opinions on all of this?

    >
    > I'm just finishing my first seam application. Will go into production
    > in the next few weeks. It is a small/mediumish project (about 35
    > klojsc). Let me tell you, it was not pain free. You still have a
    > couple of things to learn and a couple of problems to solve, just like
    > any other framework. What I like about it is that some hard problems
    > are well solved, like security, the conversational context and the
    > transaction mechanisms.
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > MM
    , Mar 18, 2008
    #4
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